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    Super slow dolly push-ins
    #1
    Senior Member Eric Coughlin's Avatar
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    What equipment are big productions typically using for very slow dolly push-ins? I'm talking slower than what you can smoothly achieve on say a Dana Dolly. Are they motion controlled? Telescoping jib? Is a Fisher dolly able to achieve slower push-ins?
    Last edited by Eric Coughlin; 10-20-2019 at 01:50 PM.


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    #2
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    A Fischer or Chapman, preferably on track. Super slow push-ins are best achieved with a lot of mass at play, like an operator and an AC with 50 pounds of camera gear sitting on a 400 pound dolly that’s rolling on track. To maintain focus on a tight lens at wide aperture, sometimes a 2nd AC will stand off to the side to indicate to the 1st AC if the subject has shifted forward or back in his seat.

    Doing a super slow dolly move in is often referred to as a Mickey Rooney, aka “a little creep.”
    Mitch Gross
    Cinema Product Manager
    Panasonic System Solutions Company


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    #3
    Director of Photography
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Gross View Post
    A Fischer or Chapman, preferably on track. Super slow push-ins are best achieved with a lot of mass at play, like an operator and an AC with 50 pounds of camera gear sitting on a 400 pound dolly that’s rolling on track. To maintain focus on a tight lens at wide aperture, sometimes a 2nd AC will stand off to the side to indicate to the 1st AC if the subject has shifted forward or back in his seat.

    Doing a super slow dolly move in is often referred to as a Mickey Rooney, aka “a little creep.”
    One of the things that can negate the effect of a super slow dolly move is extraneous movement, such as jitter or float in the frame caused by operator influence, mechanical play or irregularity in the tracking surface (floor or rail). If such movement exceeds a certain threshold, the eye is distracted to the point where the dolly move itself is hard to sense. Thus it becomes very critical that the track is expertly laid, wedged and leveled; the operator is making all frame adjustments as smooth and minimal as possible (a geared head is a great tool for this) and all tiedowns from camera to head to dolly are secured firmly. Finally, it's on the dolly grip to be able to maintain an even and continous pace to the move, which can be very tricky at slow speeds--coming to a stop in the move will give a "hitching" appearance (anyone who has used a slider has probably experienced this).
    Charles Papert
    charlespapert.com


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    #4
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    Occasionally, you can fake it with 'poor's man dolly' and post.


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    #5
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
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    I only looked in here to see if someone said “you can do it in post”.


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    #6
    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    I only looked in here to see if someone said “you can do it in post”.

    “you can do it in post” is how my wife got me to propose.
    Big sources matter.


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    With AI roto tools it's quicker then setting up a track, while still maintaining parallax effect.


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    #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by laverdir View Post
    With AI roto tools it's quicker then setting up a track, while still maintaining parallax effect.
    Surely not if humans are part of the layering?
    Charles Papert
    charlespapert.com


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    #9
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Just rent a Technocrane, so much easier.

    I was just on a national commercial shoot, they used the Dana Dolly, no Fisher on set, which was unusual. But they didn't do the move you were describing even once in four shooting days.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by puredrifting View Post
    Just rent a Technocrane, so much easier.

    I was just on a national commercial shoot, they used the Dana Dolly, no Fisher on set, which was unusual. But they didn't do the move you were describing even once in four shooting days.
    What's the slowest a technocrane can move? I've pushed a dolly on track and experienced what Charles mentioned - stopping and starting. It was so hard to maintain that speed just faster than "off" and sometimes I had no idea if the dolly was moving at all! I'm sure dolly grips would handle this move with ease, though I was surprised some type of telescoping jib wasn't the first answer.


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