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    #21
    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
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    "Audio guys around here are typically $750-$1000"


    I'm skeptical of that claim.
    Big sources matter.


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    #22
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    That's not a farfetched window in major cities.


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    #23
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    I've produced two shoots in Atlanta and a shoot in San Francisco and Sacramento last year. In the places at least, I can verify that all crew was more expensive than it would be in LA. It wouldn't surprise me if in ATL, sound mixers go for that. I noticed when I produced in ATL, everything was expensive, rentals, crew, even Crafty. In San Frrancisco last year, I paid $750.00 per day for the sound mxier plus $100.00 per extra wireless, plus $200.00 base kit fee. I think once again, we have such an insane surplus of people and gear in LA, everything is lower. When you are in a town like San Francisco where everyone knows each other, I can see that it's easier to keep rates decent. In LA, of course, it's a free for all and there plenty of camera people who own a RED or Arri and are upside down in it or have to make lease payments and end up renting the camera out with their time as camera/op/DP for $500.00 a day, which is insane for what can be a $100k camera package.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    #24
    Moderator Alex H.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPNola View Post
    "Audio guys around here are typically $750-$1000"


    I'm skeptical of that claim.
    Why?

    Labor only can be $500-750. A basic kit fee can be $200-250, and that’s just the mixer/recorder, boom kit, and 2 wireless channels. Add extra fees per wireless channel, for TC slate, TC sync boxes, wireless cam hops, Comteks... it can grow quickly.

    I’m also finding more and more that producers are asking about day rate per 12. It used to be per 10 pretty much across the board here.

    There are a couple of production companies from up north that come through town here and insist on sending their own sound kits, hiring labor only. Of course, their kits are often ridiculous. One company sends a backbreaking bag loaded with three times the amount of crap it takes to do the job.
    Nobody notices audio... until it's not there.

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    #25
    Senior Member David W. Jones's Avatar
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    The last offer I got from New York for a shoot which was about a 3Hr drive from my location was $300 a day with equipment included. Once they found out I owned a fully loaded Sprinter van they also wanted grip and lighting included for $50 more. Once I refused their offer they asked for recommendations on other sound mixers in my area. I informed them that I had zero experience of anyone local willing to work for that rate.

    Another great offer came from across the pond. A producer called and said that I was highly recommended and wanted to know my rate, which was agreeable to them. Then she shot off an equipment listing of audio gear which is used mostly in the UK. I informed her that my gear package was the equivalent of her list, but what we use here in the USA. Her reply was that the gear list can not be substituted in any way. So I told her I could rent the items which were different that my equivalent items. She replied that the rental cost would then come out of my rate as they would not pay for the rentals. Needless to say I turned the gig down.


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    #26
    Spam Assassin Mod Kegan's Avatar
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    For most commercial productions, in both Canada and the US, I've found rates to be fairly similar to the below that are the standard in Toronto:

    http://www.cpat.ca/resources/crew-te...ourlycrewrates

    Some positions vary by $50-150/day dependent on market, business of season, etc.

    Since sound is being discussed here, I've paid anywhere from $600 on corporate type shoots to $1250 inclusive of labour and equipment - again, depends on market, comteks required, etc.

    At the end of the day, you just have to be comfortable that what you're offering is a fair value to production and overall, not undercutting the marketplace in a significant way.

    KS.
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    #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by puredrifting View Post
    ... I think once again, we have such an insane surplus of people and gear in LA, everything is lower... In LA, of course, it's a free for all and there plenty of camera people who own a RED or Arri and are upside down in it or have to make lease payments and end up renting the camera out with their time as camera/op/DP for $500.00 a day, which is insane for what can be a $100k camera package.
    As an aside - in the music industry, LA is also known for its pay-to-play schemes. A band that could conceivably make a few hundred per gig in the Midwest has to guarantee a certain gate for a night club promoter. The promoter would then make a "guest list", where each performer has to deliver its share or forfeit a deposit. A club goer/fan would be contacted prior to a show with a mailer/coupon that s/he'd be able to redeem for a discount club entry. Given that the conversion rates of list members to the actual audience are fairly low, a band has to have well over a hundred names in its system to sell 20-30 tickets per show. Or they have to pay up themselves. It's the numbers game but the promoters and the club owners have to make a living too.


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    #28
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DLD View Post
    As an aside - in the music industry, LA is also known for its pay-to-play schemes. A band that could conceivably make a few hundred per gig in the Midwest has to guarantee a certain gate for a night club promoter. The promoter would then make a "guest list", where each performer has to deliver its share or forfeit a deposit. A club goer/fan would be contacted prior to a show with a mailer/coupon that s/he'd be able to redeem for a discount club entry. Given that the conversion rates of list members to the actual audience are fairly low, a band has to have well over a hundred names in its system to sell 20-30 tickets per show. Or they have to pay up themselves. It's the numbers game but the promoters and the club owners have to make a living too.
    I know, being a musician is a much tougher gig than what we do. Pay to play is insane, it's hard to believe it has come to this but I've heard about what you speak of as very "matter of fact".
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by puredrifting View Post
    I know, being a musician is a much tougher gig than what we do. Pay to play is insane, it's hard to believe it has come to this but I've heard about what you speak of as very "matter of fact".
    It was when I lived in LA. Most old Strips clubs - Gazzarri, Whisky, Coconut Teaszer, Club Lingerie, the Central (later the Viper Room), Troubadour (technically, off the Strip) were pay-for-play most of the week.


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