Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. Collapse Details
    Adding Delay/Reverb to Videos
    #1
    Senior Member egproductions's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    NJ/NYC
    Posts
    2,795
    Default
    I produce a lot of videos that are shown at dinners and the like. Often there is an inherent reverb/dealy effect that happens when the video is being shown...either because of the speaker setup a venue has or perhaps the audio engeneer is adding a delay to his mixing system for various reasons.

    That being said, I've come to like the sound of a delay in my videos...even when it's not being show live, I feel like a delay makes the video sound bigger and more important because it mimics the idea of it being shown at an important and large event.

    Is it crazy/unheard of to add a delay to videos for the aesthetic of it?

    Here is an example with and with the audio delay:

    With Delay
    www.eliecreative.com/transfer_1/delay%20test/Delay.mp3


    Without Delay
    www.eliecreative.com/transfer_1/delay%20test/No%20Delay.mp3
    Last edited by egproductions; 09-13-2019 at 11:39 AM.
    Cameras: 2x - Sony FS7, 2x - Sony A6500, Canon 5D IV, DJI Mavic Pro, Canon 5D II, Canon 60D, Canon G16, Canon Rebel XT, GoPro Hero 7, Gopro Hero 6 (RIP), 6x - GoPro Hero 3+ Black Edition, Canon XL2, iPhone 4, iPhone 6, Ricoh KR-10, Fed-2, Fujica Half Frame, Canon ZR-100, Sony DCR-TRV 310.


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #2
    Sound Ninja Noiz2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Detroit & SF
    Posts
    6,341
    Default
    If your clients like it go for it, not my cup of tea.

    I would say that if you really want to do this that you use a good convolution reverb and not a delay line. The delayed version does not sound natural at all and more like you slapped a guitar FX on it. It is also very heavy, as in it makes it harder for your audience to understand what your actors are saying. You will not notice that so much because you know what they are saying.

    And there in lies the trap. Reverb and delay lines are a bit like sugar, a little is nice but it's really easy to go too far. It is also something your ears/ brain compensate for so as you are working on something you will tend to add "just a bit more" because the old level has become you new norm and it doesn't sound reverby. Less experienced mixers, in music, often way over do the reverb and often pull the lead singer too far down. It's a very easy trap to get into.

    But I am just one opinion and posting it here you will get a bunch more, which is the best way to find out if you have gone too far (fresh ears).
    Cheers
    SK


    Scott Koue
    Web Page
    Noiz on Noise


    ďIt ainít ignorance that causes all the troubles in this world, itís the things that people know that ainít soĒ

    Edwin Howard Armstrong
    creator of modern radio


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Berlin
    Posts
    1,461
    Default
    Delay for those kind of videos is just plain wrong.
    Reduces clarity and screams "I'm an amateur who have no idea what I'm doing".

    If it was something that was supposed to be surrealistic or if the environment warrant it, sure. But in the video you posted it just sounds silly.
    Sony NEX-FS700R | A7S | Odyssey 7Q+ | Atomos Ninja V
    Sony 24-70/2.8 GM, 70-200/2.8GM, SEL 50/1.8, 35/1.8, 18-105/4, FE 28-70 | Samyang 16, 35 & 85mm Cine
    Sachtler Flowtech 75 | Benro S8
    MacBook Pro 2018 6-core i7 2.6 ghz / 32gb ram / 512gb HD | macOS Mojave
    Hackintosh i7-8700K 6-core 3.7 ghz / 32 gb ram / 512gb NVMe / Radeon RX 580 | macOS Mojave


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #4
    Senior Member egproductions's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    NJ/NYC
    Posts
    2,795
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Noiz2 View Post
    If your clients like it go for it, not my cup of tea.

    I would say that if you really want to do this that you use a good convolution reverb and not a delay line. The delayed version does not sound natural at all and more like you slapped a guitar FX on it. It is also very heavy, as in it makes it harder for your audience to understand what your actors are saying. You will not notice that so much because you know what they are saying.

    And there in lies the trap. Reverb and delay lines are a bit like sugar, a little is nice but it's really easy to go too far. It is also something your ears/ brain compensate for so as you are working on something you will tend to add "just a bit more" because the old level has become you new norm and it doesn't sound reverby. Less experienced mixers, in music, often way over do the reverb and often pull the lead singer too far down. It's a very easy trap to get into.

    But I am just one opinion and posting it here you will get a bunch more, which is the best way to find out if you have gone too far (fresh ears).
    Thank you, this is exactly why I was asking the question. I wanted a unbiased and experienced opinion on it. I tend to play it really safe with my dialogue audio for interviews and almost never eq for fear of messing things up or thinking something sounds better but in reality I'm destroying it.

    Does the interview audio in the non delayed version sound good to you? Would you have EQed things a little differently?
    Cameras: 2x - Sony FS7, 2x - Sony A6500, Canon 5D IV, DJI Mavic Pro, Canon 5D II, Canon 60D, Canon G16, Canon Rebel XT, GoPro Hero 7, Gopro Hero 6 (RIP), 6x - GoPro Hero 3+ Black Edition, Canon XL2, iPhone 4, iPhone 6, Ricoh KR-10, Fed-2, Fujica Half Frame, Canon ZR-100, Sony DCR-TRV 310.


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    835
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Noiz2 View Post
    If your clients like it go for it, not my cup of tea.

    I would say that if you really want to do this that you use a good convolution reverb and not a delay line.
    Great comments from Scott. If you want to try adding some room/space to your tracks, you could try the convolution reverb tools in Adobe Audition, Adobe Premiere, and Apple Logic. Wouldn't be surprised if Vegas Pro had some too. There are other more flexible tools, but you may already have something that'll work for when you want to do this sort of thing.
    ----------
    Jim Feeley
    POV Media


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #6
    Senior Member Rick R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Planet X
    Posts
    2,425
    Default
    I would never ever never add reverb, delay to any audio track unless it's for some 'special effect'. Reverb, echo and other FX are common in music mixes though.


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    835
    Default
    I've used reverb (specifically IR/convolution) for ADR, greenscreen inserts, and semi-smoothing wet & dry shots in a sequence (common indie story...just trying to solve an understandable on-set problem).

    (Or am I misreading your comment, Rick, and you're talking about delay reverb?)
    ----------
    Jim Feeley
    POV Media


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #8
    Sound Ninja Noiz2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Detroit & SF
    Posts
    6,341
    Default
    I have added delay and reverb to dialog, though really ADR. Sometimes stuff just comes out too "close mic'd" and it doesn't fit. In almost all cases now I would use a convolution reverb because they just sound so much better.

    Even these very in your face clips I could see putting some room on, but small room with soft surfaces and a light touch. It would take it a touch out of the "studio" and make it a bit more close and personal.

    The biggest stand out problem with the big bounce (other than intelligibility) is that it doesn't fit the space we see. If instead it was shot in a wide shot in a large hall and sounded really close up you would want some bounce/ reverb so the sound matched the image.
    Cheers
    SK


    Scott Koue
    Web Page
    Noiz on Noise


    ďIt ainít ignorance that causes all the troubles in this world, itís the things that people know that ainít soĒ

    Edwin Howard Armstrong
    creator of modern radio


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Beverly Hills, CA
    Posts
    2,071
    Default
    Reverb can be cool:



    Long delay works too:



    Reverb + long delay:



    Tweaking the 'Cathedral' type reverbs (typically turning them down a bit and adjusting various parameters) has a nice effect to deepen and widen the space. Usually best to err on the side of too little vs. too much (have others review your work as well, easy to get carried away). If you go through all the reverbs in Premiere, Audition, and Logic X, there's a lot of options.

    Lots more options with plugins: https://iconcollective.com/top-reverb-plugins/
    + free plugins: https://www.soundshockaudio.com/10-b...b-vst-plugins/


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #10
    Senior Member Rick R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Planet X
    Posts
    2,425
    Default
    I assumed the OP was referring to playback in a hall with a sound system. Using reverb and such to simulate a room or other environment is common.


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •