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    New Panasonic Single Sensor B4 camera - AJ-CX4000GJ
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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Hmm...this just came across my feeds. Interesting, a B4 mount P2 4K camera. All the copy says it contains is a "large-sized"sensor. Wonder which size to work properly with a B4 lens in 4K? Anyone know?
    This form factor is so superior to any of our digital cinema camera messes, it's intrguing. Can shoot P2 Xpress P2 or SDCX cards too. Wonder what it costs?

    Record high quality images supporting 4K and HDR with high-efficiency 10-bit HEVC CODEC. Supports IP (NDI|HX) connectivity and HD live streaming

    Wiesbaden, DE. 11 September 2019 – Panasonic will showcase its new AJ-CX4000GJ broadcast shoulder mount 4K camera at IBC 2019. The product, which will launch in December 2019, follows the handheld-type AG-CX350 as the new “CX” Series lineup of 4K camera recorders.

    The AJ-CX4000GJ is a B4 lens mount, interchangeable lens camera recorder that is typical for broadcast use. It is equipped with a large-sized 11MP image sensor and enables high quality 4K (UHD) image recording with a horizontal resolution of 2000 TV lines. It is also compatible with HDR, compliant with BT.2100 and BT.2020.

    The high efficiency and high image quality “HEVC” CODEC is adopted for the recording of 4K images. Long time recording with 4K/10-bit high image quality is possible whilst keeping bitrate and storage size under control. The high speed transfer and reliable “expressP2” card or the low running cost “microP2” card (SDXC memory card can also be used) can be selected for recording media. It also supports the recording of the “AVC-ULTRA” CODEC (HD) from the conventional P2HD Series. UHD 60p/50p 10-bit 4:2:2 output via a 12G-SDI output is also possible.

    Additionally, it offers an innovative network solution. Images can be distributed in HD mode to internet live streaming services using the “Direct Streaming” function, compatible with RTSP, RTMP and RTMPS. The LAN terminal, equipped with a lock mechanism (1000BASE-T compatibility), supports NDI|HX connectivity. Transmission and camera control is possible with an IP connection and can be linked to a recording/distribution system combined with Panasonic’s remote camera.

    For sports events and documentary recording, this camera offers the high-quality 4K images that are required for the broadcasting industry.

    AJ-CX4000 profile.jpg

    AJ-CX4000 three quarter.jpg
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
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    Does it need special lenses that cover the larger than 2/3 inch sensor? Obviously if it is using the "standard" b4 lenses, the image circle is pretty small, and the sensor is pretty deep in the mount.


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    It looks like a $70,000 camera.


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    You know those optical adapters that allow B4 lenses to be used on larger sensor cameras? That type of technology is built into this camera. Because it's native to the design and built right up in front of the chip, it is of a higher quality than any of the standard add-on optical adapters. It allows us to use the advances in our larger sensor designs with our 2/3" shouldermount P2 clients. It's quite impressive.
    Mitch Gross
    Cinema Product Manager
    Panasonic System Solutions Company


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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg_E View Post
    Does it need special lenses that cover the larger than 2/3 inch sensor? Obviously if it is using the "standard" b4 lenses, the image circle is pretty small, and the sensor is pretty deep in the mount.
    Thats what I found intriguing, B4, 4K and large sensor dont all add up together. Mitch? Can you advise how large the sensor is even though I know this isn't your groups camera, is it? Also, my press release had no indication of price, do you know or can you share yet?
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
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    Mitch, are there any stops lost like on the traditional adapters?


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    Senior Member Jaime Valles's Avatar
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    Dang, I don't need this, but I want it!
    Jaime Vallés
    AJV Media
    Video, Photography & Graphic Design: www.ajvmedia.com


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    Well, that's interesting.

    And since it is going from a smaller image circle, to a larger image circle, it must "lose" light. And depending on how much larger it needs to go, it may "lose" a lot of light. My wild guess would be at least 2/3 of a stop "lost", guessing it is at least a 1" sensor but could be bigger.

    Now with a big sensor, and "small" pixel count (11mp), they may have some really big photosites which may mean that the ability to gather those photos is better and there may be little to no light "lost" as an end result. Would be nice to compare to other cameras and see what the net change really is, so many places to refine the process with the sensor and DSP technology that we have today. I'm guessing that through some sort of wizardry that you'll see a camera that uses good old B4 lenses and is still more light sensitive than 2/3 inch cameras from a couple of years ago.


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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg_E View Post
    Well, that's interesting.

    And since it is going from a smaller image circle, to a larger image circle, it must "lose" light. And depending on how much larger it needs to go, it may "lose" a lot of light. My wild guess would be at least 2/3 of a stop "lost", guessing it is at least a 1" sensor but could be bigger.

    Now with a big sensor, and "small" pixel count (11mp), they may have some really big photosites which may mean that the ability to gather those photos is better and there may be little to no light "lost" as an end result. Would be nice to compare to other cameras and see what the net change really is, so many places to refine the process with the sensor and DSP technology that we have today. I'm guessing that through some sort of wizardry that you'll see a camera that uses good old B4 lenses and is still more light sensitive than 2/3 inch cameras from a couple of years ago.
    I thought about these same things. Combined with the superior form factor (My C200 rigged up for shoulder is SUCH mess compared to this), the fact that it can also shoot to SDXC or XPress P2 cards, the fact that there a boatload of good B4 lenses out there for DIRT cheap that used to cost $30K or more makes this camera very interesting to me, as long as the cost is reasonable and the 4K looks good and you can get a little better than 2/3" imager DOF and FOV. If it's a $50K or $70K camera I wouldn't be interested in it. But at C500 MKII prices, it becomes interesting for a lot of things. Or of course, as a rental. There is no scale provided but those Gold Mounts in the back of the Panasonic image look like the new generation tiny ones. As I've written several times, my Sony DSR500-WS, back in the day was one of my all time favorite cameras and I LOVED the 2/3 of a Betacam size and weight.

    If it's a modernized, 4K version Panasonic version of this with good low light and enough DOF control, it becomes quite an intriguing camera. I made sooo much money with the DSR500WS, shot with it for three years, it paid for itself on two jobs and then was an $850.00 per shoot day ATM for me for years. So reliable, such a pleasure to shoot with handheld, shoulder, jib, to fly with, I miss it.

    DSR500WS Memories.jpg
    Last edited by puredrifting; 09-11-2019 at 12:19 PM.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    Senior Member Eric Coughlin's Avatar
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    For me it's not the depth of field so much as the look of most smaller sensor cameras. Limited dynamic range, and just a flat ugly look to them that never looks nice. If they can figure out how to give a cinema look (which doesn't mean shallow depth of field), then these cameras would be more appealing. I mean, a cinema camera shooting with a deep depth of field typically looks way better to me than a broadcast camera shooting at the exact same depth of field.


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