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    The 1990's brought a lot of semi-counterfeit and fully counterfeit goods from China, Turkey, etc.

    Neither Adi nor Rudi was too amused. Then again, both were dead by then.



    More samples can be found here. https://nash-dvor.livejournal.com/3768730.html


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    A cartoon from the satirical magazine "Crocodile" (because it delivered biting humor ... get it?).

    ruebd5c047ef7.jpg

    Three athletes running (in rough translation) - Propaganda, Plan and, bring up the arrears, Actual Product.


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    Quote Originally Posted by mcbob View Post
    I can only assume those photos predate the invention of the Adidas tracksuit
    So, here's the Adidas story. In the early, 1970's, the Soviets realized that their footware wasn't even close to the top quality product from the West and began to purchase running/track shoes for their top stars. A star, naturally, had to file a special form - this was likewise the practice among the musicians asking for a Kremona or a Jolanta, as the Strat's and the Les Paul's were not available via the official channels - and the most requested brand was the dominant Euro brand Adidas. Some basketball players asked and received Converse but most preferred Adidas since it didn't only equip the West German soccer team, it made the greatest soccer ball ever - the Telstar, that was used at all major tournaments for about six years.

    18527046308_264d7d4ae2_b.jpg

    However, the Adidas footwear was not just used for races. According to Valery Borzov, the 1972 Olympic 100-M dash champion, the athletes would only use them to race in big events but all their training was done in the Soviet shoes, as the brand names were too nice to waste on practice (I am talking about practice, not a game, practice). Instead, the Adidas shoes were taken to the disco parties, where they were not just effective for movement but for attracting ladies too.

    Here's Borzov winning the 1972 gold medal. Do note the shoes. On all runners.



    By 1976, the Adidas management wanted more and, with Moscow getting the 1980 Olympics, Horst Dassler, then running the French branch of the company, decided to approach the official Soviet representatives for a full kit deal. It was indeed struck and the Soviets begin to both buy and produce the officially licensed Adidas merchandise. The problem was that Adidas took the bulk of what was made in the USSR and sold it to the 3rd World markets, including the Socialist bloc of the East Europeans.

    An Adidas labeled shoes ran anywhere from 10 to 26 rubles (average wage 120-140/mo) but were next to impossible to find in state stores. Off "resellers", the prices doubled. An authentic Adidas pair of running shoes made in West Germany could run over 100r. Meanwhile, the label itself much like Levi's or Wrigley's became a sign of prosperity and being a member of the elite subclass.

    nemolyaeva_33.jpg

    I posted this photo before. It's of an actress Anastasia Nemolyaeva, then 16, from the 1986 Soviet film "The Courier" (aka the "Gopher Boy"). The sweater was actress's own, as her father was a well respected cinematographer and her aunt was a popular actress. The Mosfilm prop department had no such thing and the role was that of a professor's daughter. When I first saw film in 2009 or so, I didn't get the brand reference. I do now.


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    Did you just throw in a little Allen Iverson reference? lol


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    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    Did you just throw in a little Allen Iverson reference? lol
    It appears he did. And what’s amazing, is that it is still used today. Especially by those that work in sports.


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    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    Did you just throw in a little Allen Iverson reference? lol
    And also, a Kremona and Jolanta references. A few former members of a popular band told me the process of guitar acquisition. There was a catalog, though most performers looked at what others already had and worked off their reviews. Then one had to fill out a form with the brand and model number and submit it to his local philharmonic hall administration. The administration would then decide if the budget warranted such an acquisition. A Soviet made guitar was in low hundreds but a Czech, Bulgarian or East German guitars could double/triple that. If one wanted an authentic US made model, he was on his own. Boris Pivovarov, considered by many to be the top Soviet player of the 1970's, purchased a 1957 Les Paul Custom for 3,500r in 1972.

    Wedding and college bands had to play the Soviet brands. Here's Tonica, referred by some as "the worst guitar ever".

    tonika8.jpg


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    Soviet cigarettes.

    Josef Stalin smoked "Herzogin Flor". He often broke up the individual ciggies and stuffed into a pipe.

    Gertsegovina-Flor.jpg

    The infamous Belomor Canal.

    Belomorkanal.jpg

    Apollo-Soyuz, because when you're riding through space on rocket fuel, you want a bit more danger. Below that, "Borodino", because the Soviets even celebrated battles of resounding defeat.

    Soyuz-Apollon-Borodino.jpg

    Cosmos, personally endorsed by Yuri Gagarin. Or not.

    kosmos-sigarety.jpg

    Aurora, endorsed by the entire Soviet Navy.

    Ulybayushhijsya-moryachok.jpg

    My dad smoked these, "Orbita'.

    26.jpg

    And these, imported from Bulgaria.

    45.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images


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    mechanic2laundr++7-18-2013-17-22-6.jpg

    A ubiquitous Soviet washing machine Riga55, allegedly a licensed copy of a Swedish model from the same era. Six million units made. A single chamber spinner. Water had to be poured in manually and there was a hose for a run-off (manual too). The water could also be squeezed out ... or one could hang wet clothes on a balcony. In our building, there was even an external drying area, where there were six concrete posts about seven feet in height. The clothesline was not provided.

    Once I recall, someone was drying a heavy wool blanket there in the middle of winter. The blanket froze rock solid. So, we kids tried to shoot hockey pucks into it, hoping that a hard slap shot would puncture a hole. I don't think any one us succeeded. We needed more oomph in our shots. And a higher quality hockey stick.



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    Those poles are all over those countries. The ends with the metal top are indeed for blankets and carpets and rugs. We did pull-ups on them. (Were much higher than above.)


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    Ours were actually made of concrete pipes (hollow inside) and the area was much larger than above too, @ ~ 20 x 10 meters. There were no horizontal rods either. We mostly played soccer or hockey there anyway but, when someone covered everything with laundry ... well, we continued playing despite being yelled at. It was an additional series of obstacles one had to overcome.

    PS. We were also helped that we had a fence behind it, so we used those concrete pipes as goal posts. Which worked pretty well until someone shot the ball over the fence. Then he had to go into the neighboring building's backyard and get the ball. The puck was a lost cause, especially if we played in snow. If it went over the fence, it would not be found until the following spring.


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