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    #61
    Sound Ninja Noiz2's Avatar
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    Most conversations I have seen on this get numbers confused. There is the 32bit float file, 32 bit float processing internal to the program, and the bit depth of the actual program.
    So while many DAW's used 32 bit float for processing they did not read or write 32 bit float files and of course nether are related (directly anyway) to whether the DAW is a 32 bit application.

    ProTools historically did not process in 32 bit Float it used 48 bit fixed, and it didn't read or write 32 bit float. It may now but if we are talking about post sound on a big feature the odds are that the version of PT is a number of versions back.
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    SK


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    #62
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    Pro Tools stopped using 24/48 fixed in 2011. Since then it's 32/64-bit float.
    Apps have been 32-bit for over 20 years, now most current apps are 64-bit (compiled for 64-bit OSes). Float-32 (single) and -64 (double) are indeed separate from the app's compilation (32 or 64-bit instructions and addressing).

    If someone's using old Pro Tools TDM hardware (24/48 bit) along with an old copy of Pro Tools, they could run post 2011 Pro Tools to fix over/under (levels) recordings then save as 24 bit files for further editing on the old TDM hardware (I used to own TDM hardware with Pro Tools- was glad to sell it and just use the computer: can edit anywhere, laptop etc.).


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    #63
    Senior Member Jaime Valles's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Feeley View Post
    Perhaps it's helpful to view 32-bit float as analogous to auto-focus: A useful too that's not needed or even beneficial to plenty of productions.
    I'm not an audio expert in any way, but I see it more like what raw recording is to video shooting. It's simply more information available for post production to do with as it pleases. If it was recorded properly on set, then all is good. But if on the one great acting take the performer unexpectedly screamed really loudly, in 32bit float it means that the audio file didn't clip.

    It's a safety net, and one that will come in very handy for lower budget shoots.
    Jaime Vallés
    AJV Media
    Video, Photography & Graphic Design: www.ajvmedia.com


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    #64
    Senior Member cpreston's Avatar
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    For those who have used 32bit recorders, how do they compensate for audio monitoring? I imagine some type of compression. I mean, the last thing I want is the full dynamic range transmitted to my ears. I learned through experience that one of the nice things about limiters is that they protect your hearing.


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    #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by cpreston View Post
    For those who have used 32bit recorders, how do they compensate for audio monitoring? I imagine some type of compression. I mean, the last thing I want is the full dynamic range transmitted to my ears. I learned through experience that one of the nice things about limiters is that they protect your hearing.
    Agree it’s needed. Haven’t heard back if they added an output limiter, for both headphones and to camera (requested features after testing the MixPre 6 I).


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    #66
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    Cool
    My copy of Sound Forge 9.0e from 2007 supports 32-bit float recordings with up to 32 channels. I bet 32-bit float support probably goes back to earlier versions of Sound Forge too.


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    #67
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    Nice review from from Curtis Judd that demos the wide dynamic range capabilities and has a comparison with the Zoom F6.



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    #68
    Senior Member Rick R's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDingo View Post
    My copy of Sound Forge 9.0e from 2007 supports 32-bit float recordings with up to 32 channels. I bet 32-bit float support probably goes back to earlier versions of Sound Forge too.
    Not go off-topic but.. Sound Forge has been 32-bit float as far back as possible with early PC hardware and the OS. The same with Vegas. Both of which were acquired from Sony in 2016 by MAGIX Software GmbH. Prior to Sony, Sonic Foundry was the initial developer of Sound Forge and Vegas. I have been a Sound Forge user since version 3.0 and a Vegas user since version 1.0, which was a DAW (audio only.. no video).
    I am the moderator of the MAGIX Sound Forge forum.


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