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    #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by offbeatbryce View Post
    I've been struggling with finding a good way to use headphones while filming in super loud environments like Music performances, Protests etc. My camera headphone volume is all the way up and I can hardly hear anything in the headphones as the outside noise is overpowering what I would hear in the headphones.
    The laws of physics aren't with you on this. If your head is in the sound space, you can only knock down the surrounding noise by something around the mid -30s dB. The reason for this is that your ear canals are not the only way sound reaches your eardrums. Your nasal passages resonate at interesting frequencies. Even your eyes let sound into your skull.

    About the best you can practically do are either the previously mentioned Remote Audio HN-7506s, or a good in-ear monitor while adding noise blocking "ear muffs" like the 3M Peltor X5s over your ears. This will not likely be enough for what you want, but it's all the laws of physics are willing to give you. If you've *got* to have more, get your body out of the sound field. It really is the only way.

    Your natural inclination (as you've already stated) is to crank your headphone amps all the way up to try to overpower the noise. This is a fool's game, and will almost certainly destroy your hearing. You can not over power noise like this. If the only place you can stand is in front of a speaker, use your brain and decline the job. No job is worth your hearing. They can't pay you enough to make your going deaf worth it.

    It's good that you're asking questions like this. If you don't protect your hearing, who will?

    Continue your education; learn how much noise exposure (both loudness levels, and duration times) result in permanent hearing loss. OSHA has information. As does AudiologyOnline. As do industry websites like Etymotic. There are of course many other sources; noise and hearing loss have been studied for hundreds of years. Search away.


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    #12
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    I’ve been using custom molded IEM(soft silicone/rubber/whatever, not hard rigid plastic like the ones singers wear on stage) for well over a decade and in-ear-drivers in what amounted to normal foam plugs, before that. I’ve been shooting racing since the 90’s(NASCAR, NHRA, IRL, IMSA, motorcycles, etc.) and this has been my SOP for hearing protection and monitoring audio. I actually use them everywhere, not just “loud” environments.

    The custom IEM’s are going to take you a second or two longer to get in and out vs. headphones, but are going to be much lighter and low-profile to wear, especially if you’re shooting and have the camera on your shoulder. Personally, I’d never shoot with a camera on my shoulder with a headphone covering my right ear(especially a headphone that is capable of properly isolating/blocking extraneous noise). You can’t get your head into the right position and will fatigue your neck quickly. Check into the IEM’s if you’re constantly in loud environments. It only takes about five minutes to get molds of your ears done and the company that I get mine from usually turns them around in 2-3 weeks, depending on how busy they are. I think I even got a pair made in one week before.


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    #13
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    These Howard Leight shooting earmuffs have a 3.5mm input, but I have no idea about their sound quality.


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    #14
    Senior Member Rick R's Avatar
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    +1 Remote Audio HN-7506 High Noise Headphones.
    Many low budget recorders and mixers have anemic HP amps, only 10 or 20 mW and only go just so loud before they distort. In my experience, 50mW per channel the absolute usable minimum for 'louder the dialog' environments. Sound Devices and Zaxcom HP amps have lots of clean power... and enough to cause hearing damage, so use wisely.


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    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick R View Post
    Sound Devices and Zaxcom HP amps have lots of clean power... and enough to cause hearing damage, so use wisely.
    SD has a note about that in (at least some of) their manuals. And that gets to another reason to use something like the HN-7506: The extra isolation means you're not tempted to crank the headphone amp to get volumes above the environment...

    Anyway, let us know what you end up doing and how it works for you...
    ----------
    Jim Feeley
    POV Media


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