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    #41
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    Cool
    Quote Originally Posted by aram View Post
    I used to use Vegas too and I think if I went back to it, it would probably still be the video editor where I can work fastest (the way cutting works just made sense to me), but from version 12 onwards it just crashed on my system all the time (three different systems over the years).
    I've been using Vegas since 2004 ( back when it was made by Sonic Foundry and called "Video Vegas" ), and with Vegas Pro 16 I had reinstall a fresh copy of Windows 10 on both of my workstations in order to get VP 16 to run without problems. ( for whatever reason Vegas is very sensitive to Windows registry errors, I regularly use the free CCleaner registry cleaner to keep things running in top shape )


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    #42
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    Ditto to all Dingo and yes to CC. I jump between Resolve and Vegas depending on the job. I also have Edius and used to use Premiere and years before that had two Discreet Logic edit* systems. Twenty years ago edit* was a great editor with a real time 2D and 3D hardware cards but was a shocker on audio and that's when I really started to use Soundforge and Vegas for audio. The programs were compiled on edit* then handed off to Soundforge/Vegas for all the audio QC and sweetening before network delivery. The fact that Soundforge can be invoked from the Vegas timeline and saved back into the timeline without ever leaving Vegas is a neat way to work. It's nice to be able to work down to audio sample levels in a video editor to remove a click or spike that's right in the middle of a frame.

    Chris Young


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    #43
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    aram ~

    After reducing the boxiness sound as you put it to me it reveals that there is a certain mild harshness to his voice. A lot of how things sound I think has to do with taste. Exactly what the Vegas smooth/enhance is doing in tech terms I don't know. All I know is if you move to the negative it becomes a more 'damped' sound. You make a valid comment about hearing frequencies though. The older we get the more our high frequency hearing diminishes. When I was younger I had no trouble hearing the 15625Hz refresh rate of PAL CRT monitors. Struggling to do that these days but then I only have two SDI CRTs left. Both reference color monitors. A well respected custom amplifier builder in the UK once said to me "We know this high frequency loss affects older people because when we check the oldies setups many will have the treble settings turned down because as their hearing loses its elasticity higher frequencies begin to sound harsher and a little distorted. This may or may not be what you are perceiving as harshness. Get a decent set of speakers and a sine wave generator and wind it up until you hear harshness take a note of that frequency and then you know where your upper limit of hearing cannot be relied on for critical evaluation. Sad to say but it's true.

    Finally as a last quick tweak taking on board what Dingo said about it still sounding a little flat and muddy in the mids and top end I had one more quick look and I think improved it by slapping an EssentialFX Male Voiceover plug onto the existing chain and giving it a bit of a tweak. I don't think I would be doing much more to it than that if it was my job as it always comes down to time vs budget and this result I know would not raise too many eyebrows in any of my intended audiences.

    https://www.sendspace.com/pro/dl/a6lcdu

    Chris Young

    Boxiness + Vocal Strip.jpg


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    #44
    Senior Member paulears's Avatar
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    Going back to the original post - I prefer that to the now heavily processed version. Surely we are really talking about a very average recording with poor signal to noise. We can try to repair poor recordings and they're always a compromise. Getting it right in the first place is the key.


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    #45
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    Agreed paulears, as I said in post #39. Better to get it right on the day and avoid heartache later.

    Chris Young


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    #46
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    Here is my attempt. What do you think? Was trying to keep the upper end of the voice natural sounding

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/5eizqd13ba...ss_cu.wav?dl=0


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    #47
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    Thanks for all your answers guys. Just got home from holidays and will have a look around and probably will have some more questions when I am done looking, tomorrow!


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    #48
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    Bernie, I really liked that!

    You clearly used some denoise (or at least a notch to get rid of that noise at about 960Hz)

    I noticed that you softened a lot of the plosives by quite a bit and I think it works, beautifully. I had not noticed they were an issue until I listened (and looked at the spectrogram) of your version.

    I saw you did high and low passes but your low pass starts only at 15K and seems relatively gentle. It worked for me!

    Did you do any EQing besides the passes?


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    #49
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    Chris, I think that person who told you about losing hearing elasticity nailed it. As a teacher I have to be in sometimes pretty noisy environments and there's a point when I start hearing these reverby distortions. It has also happened with music in places with a lot of reverb. It is as if some frequencies started accumulating to the point that the start sounding almost like the distortion that comes from clipping digital sound, even though the sound sources are as analogue as they can be (it happened to me once seeing Spencer Krug doing one of his piano only concerts in a church in London).

    Gonna do a test at some point and see if I can identify those problem frequencies.

    Thanks again to everyone, it is great to be learning from all of you!


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    #50
    Sound Ninja Noiz2's Avatar
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    Along with general hearing issues rooms can only handle so much energy. Once you pass the energy a room can handle you get distortions. Acoustic spaces like churches can easily overload with amplified sound, or even really loud acoustic instruments. Now on a strictly science level it may be that it's more your ears but there is also an issue that acoustically sound is pressure waves and if the sound gets too loud in an enclosed space the pressure never really gets back to atmosphere. Electrically this would be like adding a DC offset and it lowers the point where you will get noticeable distortion.
    Cheers
    SK


    Scott Koue
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    ďIt ainít ignorance that causes all the troubles in this world, itís the things that people know that ainít soĒ

    Edwin Howard Armstrong
    creator of modern radio


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