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    #11
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    I paid close to $2,000 a year to put a quarter-page advertisement in a wedding magazine. I don't think I got a single call from it. All my jobs were by word of mouth.

    Didn't press record (or was recording and then pressed it to start but I really just stopped)
    Oh, who has not done this? Thankfully the only time I did it for a job was for the cake cutting. For that segment, I inserted a short montage of the photographer's stills, who was kind of enough to sell them to me for $20. The couple mentioned that montage as one of the things they especially liked.


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    #12
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    [QUOTE=TheDingo;1986797042]
    1- Not paying enough attention to the green PAUSE indicator with my Panasonic ENG camera. ( I always wished that the camera would put a big green X across the screen whenever the camera was in PAUSE mode )


    +1 I want this feature


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    #13
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    Seconded.


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    #14
    Senior Member QuickHitRecord's Avatar
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    This thread is bringing back some painful memories. There are the obvious ones that many people on here will relate to: not checking WB/shutter speed/fps, failing to get the battery perfectly seated in the charger and showing up to a shoot with dead batteries, bringing the tripod but forgetting the QR plate (get ready to stack those books!), etc. I've forgotten to switch on phantom power before, and I definitely do not miss the days of 480P monitors and moire.

    I have spent more than one panicked evening between shoot days skipping dinner with the producer and/or crew and running around a town I didn't know very well trying to track down some little screw or battery or adapter.

    One time, I remember putting some brand new media in a camera without formatting it. Everything seemed to be going well. A few hours in, we tried to review the footage and NONE OF IT WAS THERE. I was really green at the time and eager to prove myself. It was one of the worst days of my life. To this day, I still record a test clip and play it back before shooting.

    I still make mistakes, though not nearly as many. And modern codecs are so, SO much more forgiving.


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    #15
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    One thing I note here is the camera not being your friend.

    The roll/not role getting out of phase so your record everything you dont want!

    Another reason that most cameras are not on our side.

    --

    My mistakes? Many.. mostly not rolling long enough.. its an ex still photographer problem!


    My new motto is not to try something new on set in the grip department. Last week I was slow to rig a Discovery when the BMW we rig all the time was sitting right next to it.
    The terrain did not require the Disco as I thought it would - I failed to flex to the actual conditions, not the ones I had mentally prepared for.

    Also I MUST start ensuring there is a 5min 'expectations' chat before every shoot day, even if the director/AD does not initiate it as they should.

    Aslo I need to watch more playback. Even if the director says the take was good it might not have been.


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    #16
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    I second the waste(s) of money on "advertising". I learned that great work and personal relationships go a lot farther for small business than ads or sponsoring etc...

    Also second the idea of staying calm and alert on jobs to be able to notice the small details. Clients will often push too fast or distract and you literally have to learn how block a lot of what is going on out to focus on the important stuff. This is the largest area for "mistakes" imho.

    What I always tell new folks in the one man band industry is to show up early - like 30 min. to an hour. You can't fix any problems if you do not have time...


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    #17
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    The usual:

    1. Like almost all of us, have thought I was recording when I wasn't, missed the first half of a touchy, hard to get interview, at least I got a clue and recorded the second half
    2. Have probably been too vocal about my intense hatred of the unions, especially in LA, but also in NYC. It's okay to hate the unions, they deserve it because they completely suck, but I should have been less vociferous in my verbal condemnation, has probably cost me business.
    3. In the early years of my career, I bought way too much crap equipment. Bogen/Manfrotto tripods and heads, cheap audio mixer that gave me some grief on a high profile job, crappy Lowell light kits instead of Arris back in the Tungsten days, etc. Buying crap equipment is short sighted and ultimately much more expensive than buying "costly" good equipment. I still own both of my Sachtlers I bought nearly 18 years ago. Quality isn't expensive if you amortize how much it costs you per year, how much you charge for it in rentals to clients and how little it breaks down. Crap equipment is just money down the toilet and frustrating.
    4. Didn't always check the gate when I was shooting film. Nearly had some projects melt down when we would get a hair or lint in the gate and it would be there, dancing around on the edge of frame for the world to see. Gate check must ALWAYS be done when shooting film and I didn't always do it when we were in a hurry
    5. Got into a pissing contest with a corporate client who called me into their office and told me to my face that he was going to stiff me on $45k owed on canceled shoots, shoots I hired crew for, had to pay crew so I charged client. Had always done business on a handshake/honor system wih them, told this client that I would no longer do any business with them without a highly vetted contract and ANY changes would be subject to review from my attorney. This client had it out for me and as a high executive in the org, ended up black balling my company from the organization because I dared to NOT let him screw me out of $45k. In hindsight, I should have swallowed my pride, ate the $45k. Losing this client cost me over a million dollars in one year and millions more in subsequent years. It's hard to let someone screw you out of tens of thousands of dollars, but in this case, it would have easily been worth it.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    #18
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    I was filming a corporate video and had to film an interview with the guy who's in charge of a hearse company. I knew I wanted a hearse in the shot, but I didn't have a composition in mind. On the day I had limited time to decide the best camera position before he resumes his job from downtime. Time was running out and I was in a lot of stress as I couldn't make up my mind on composition. The guy grew impatient, to the point that he just moved the tripod to a spot which happened to be a good spot for the camera. I was embarrassed.
    Last edited by wildstriker; 08-03-2019 at 06:49 AM.


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    #19
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    I had one when I was first breaking into sports. I was operating a roaming camera for the in house broadcast of an NBA team. HD wasnít a thing yet, so back then the roaming camera was a little fixed lens camcorder hooked up to a wireless unit. Basically in the NBA timeouts are where the money is made for the in house broadcasts, everything is sponsored. In this particular time out there was some sort of game, I donít remember, but probably something corny like karaoke. Anyway, Iím standing there with the contestants waiting for my hit and I notice that the battery is on low, but I think to myself, ďit hasnít warned me so I should be fine until after the hit.Ē

    The timeout took far longer to happen than I expected, and by the time they take my camera I think I got about halfway through the intro before the camera died while I was live. They backed up the shot with another hard camera, but we had a particular director who was the type that wonít drop it. So for the rest of the game when he had a chance he would berate me. Come to think of it, F%*# that guy lol.

    Anyway, I worked for that team for like 13 years and ended up becoming one of their top operators. I never let that mistake happen again, and now as an ENG op Iím always conscious of battery life.
    Last edited by Newsguy; 08-03-2019 at 12:35 AM.


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    #20
    Senior Member Kellar42's Avatar
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    This is a great thread!

    I'm guilty of not holding shots long enough after taking stills for such a long time, perhaps still till this day.
    Overpromising on unrealistic deadlines is a dangerous one.
    My favorite silly/stupid mistake is on two occasions almost two years apart recording on an external recorder with the camera info and a focus box burned into the recording.
    Stuart Hooper


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