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    #11
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    I love the Fujinons but I bought the 18-110 with the camera as a kit. I do not regret that lens in the least. But with a higher budget, I would certainly look at the Fujinons. Just my .02. Ultimately, hard to go really wrong.


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    #12
    Senior Member legrevedotcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nsoltz View Post
    I love the Fujinons but I bought the 18-110 with the camera as a kit. I do not regret that lens in the least. But with a higher budget, I would certainly look at the Fujinons. Just my .02. Ultimately, hard to go really wrong.
    Same... ended up getting both setups. The 18-110 for the fast stuff and the fujinons for the times where theres time to set up each shot.


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    #13
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    Have number of lenses but the one that is getting most of the work on the FS7 is the workhorse 18-110. After a couple of years beating around the traps it hasn't failed. For the price it offers a decent range, it's parfocal, constant aperture, no CA and stabilized. It has an average servo that is handy sometimes for slow interview creeps. All in all not sexy but it does the job and keeps earning. If it died or got wrecked tomorrow I would buy another one straight away.

    Chris Young

    EDIT:

    Just make sure you are running the latest firmware if running an SELP18110G as this fixed focus issues some users had. Can't do the upgrade from an FS7 MkI but can be done from a MKII or alternatively one of the A7 range. Aussie download below... but you should be able to find it in your neck of the woods wherever you are

    https://www.sony.com.au/electronics/...loads/00015308
    Last edited by cyvideo; 07-20-2019 at 09:39 PM. Reason: additional info and URL


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    #14
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    The 18-110 does look extremely versatile as a workhorse lens. I just wish there was a way to make the servo faster and more responsive. I'll probably do what legrevedotcom did and have both the 18-110 for the fast stuff and the Fujinons for the shots where I can take my time.
    Last edited by Joshua Milligan; 07-19-2019 at 10:04 AM.


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    #15
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Fuji 20-120: $13,500. Real lens. Real servos. Real professional build quality. Real parfocal performance. Manual mechanical everything. Good range(although the back-end is lacking a little) so the lens essentially never needs to come off(Speed, efficiency, convenience), unless you need super shallow DoF for an interview(but I shoot int's all the time with my 17-120). Constant T3.5.

    Fuji 18-55 & 50-135: $7,800/pair. Light weight & small and budget friendly. Okay build-quality for owner/ops. But two lenses to cover the range and no servo's(have to go third party solution). Constant T2.9.

    Sony 18-110: $3,500. Inexpensive/good bang for the buck. Light weight. Good range. Built-in Optical stabilization. Slowest aperture of the listed lenses. Fly-by-wire focus. Computer controlled/adjustable elements to maintain parfocal performance. Slow servo's. Reports of "out running" the adjustments the lens makes to maintain focus/parfocal performance. f/4 which probably equates to T4.4 or close to it.

    If budget wasn't a concern, given only these three choices, I'd take the 20-120. Yes, it's $10K more than the Sony, but if you shoot things that require you to make almost instant adjustments, reframes, reliable & repeatable zooms, crash zooms, etc., it seems like the one to pick(I've used the 20-120 and the MK's-some). Yeah, you can buy several of each of the others for what one costs, but it's the better lens, especially from an operators point of view. Which is how I look at most of my purchases, since I'm going to be the one using it day-in and day-out. Even when we're talking about thousands and thousands of dollars, to me, that operational satisfaction takes precedents over money(within reason). Trust me, you'll forget about the money when you're in 'the sh!t' and you're cussing your equipment, because it's not performing the way that you want or need in the heat of battle or even in the mundane, when it's something you use day in or day out, everyday.


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    #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Run&Gun View Post
    Fuji 20-120: $13,500. Real lens. Real servos. Real professional build quality. Real parfocal performance. Manual mechanical everything. Good range(although the back-end is lacking a little) so the lens essentially never needs to come off(Speed, efficiency, convenience), unless you need super shallow DoF for an interview(but I shoot int's all the time with my 17-120). Constant T3.5.

    Fuji 18-55 & 50-135: $7,800/pair. Light weight & small and budget friendly. Okay build-quality for owner/ops. But two lenses to cover the range and no servo's(have to go third party solution). Constant T2.9.

    Sony 18-110: $3,500. Inexpensive/good bang for the buck. Light weight. Good range. Built-in Optical stabilization. Slowest aperture of the listed lenses. Fly-by-wire focus. Computer controlled/adjustable elements to maintain parfocal performance. Slow servo's. Reports of "out running" the adjustments the lens makes to maintain focus/parfocal performance. f/4 which probably equates to T4.4 or close to it.

    If budget wasn't a concern, given only these three choices, I'd take the 20-120. Yes, it's $10K more than the Sony, but if you shoot things that require you to make almost instant adjustments, reframes, reliable & repeatable zooms, crash zooms, etc., it seems like the one to pick(I've used the 20-120 and the MK's-some). Yeah, you can buy several of each of the others for what one costs, but it's the better lens, especially from an operators point of view. Which is how I look at most of my purchases, since I'm going to be the one using it day-in and day-out. Even when we're talking about thousands and thousands of dollars, to me, that operational satisfaction takes precedents over money(within reason). Trust me, you'll forget about the money when you're in 'the sh!t' and you're cussing your equipment, because it's not performing the way that you want or need in the heat of battle or even in the mundane, when it's something you use day in or day out, everyday.
    Hey Run&Gun, thanks for your response. It’s not the price of the 20-120 that worries me, it’s the weight. I’m unsure of how I’ll like working with a 6.5 pound lens everyday.


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    #17
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    Totally agree with R&G's comments other than R&G's experience with regard to focus issues. I have never had any focus issues with the 18-110 when in full manual hard stop mode. Totally repeatable focus pulls when using a decent focus demand. About the only time I use the fly-by-wire focus mode is for extreme close ups because that allows you to come down to about 18" which can be pretty useful at times.

    If you go with the workhorse Sony 18-100 also consider this. I've used a colleagues one a number of times and been more than impressed with the results from it. Designed specifically for the 28-135 on the FS7 but works perfectly well on the 18-100. The 18-110 plus this Century Precision Optics 0.8 WA zoom thru converter comes to about $4.5k. What it does do is convert your 18-110 to a very, very usable 14.4-88mm. Especially love the 14.4 end. A very similar range to a Cabrio 19-90 but wider... The colleague I borrow it from calls it his poor man's Cabrio. Trying to temp myself into buying one.

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...ter.html/specs

    On the other hand if it's primarily HD you are shooting and you really want range and lens speed and 100% control over zoom, manual or fast smooth servo plus have constant aperture and parfocal performance even consider a good used B4 lens with an MTF B4 to S16 adapter with the servo/stop start cable. Today good B4 HD lenses can be had for around $3-4k. I've used this combo for with the FS7's center crop for many, many broadcast sporting events and no complaints from anyone. A broadcast B4 lens will drop to about F2.3 with the MTF's .7 of a stop light loss. A very workable solution. Is it true HD resolution? Yes it is. The S16 center crop on the FS7 pixel wise is 2178 x 1148 which equates to just on 2.5K which after a debayer loss of 20% gives you just on 2k which means you have a true 1920 x 1080 resolution. About $5k all up. This Mike Tappa video explains how it works, totally applies to its performance on the FS7.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_-iYs7iegM&t=21s

    Chris Young


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    #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyvideo View Post
    Totally agree with R&G's comments other than R&G's experience with regard to focus issues. I have never had any focus issues with the 18-110 when in full manual hard stop mode. Totally repeatable focus pulls when using a decent focus demand. About the only time I use the fly-by-wire focus mode is for extreme close ups because that allows you to come down to about 18" which can be pretty useful at times.
    Was talking gear last weekend with a friend who owns an 18-110. His focus experience was that the first one he bought wasn't parfocal -- so he took it back immediately and tested the units in stock until he found one that was. He's happy with it now.


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    #19
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    I'm very happy with my 18-110 but be beware of misadjusted lenses from Sony. I had 2 bad experiences:
    First was a friends brand new lens I was evaluating and it was simply soft all through the range. Sent it back to Sony and they said it was fine and up to all specs. Friend demanded a different lens and that one was absolutely fine. Very odd.

    Odder still was that mine got dropped on a rental and the front ring where the filter attaches was cracked. But the lens still functioned fine and was still sharp and parfocal. I researched it and found what looked like the right part which was only around $100 but i sent it to Sony for repair. Because its "E Mt" it went to Sony consumer repair in LA not Professional. It came back with a $750 bill. $100 for the part and $650 for a thorough recalibration of the electronics and optics in the lens. Unfortunately it was no longer parfocal and was way off!

    I contacted the repair department and for a while they didn't even understand what I was talking about when I had to explain to them that the lens should be electronically parfocal. Anyway, I sent it back to them and it came back only slightly better. I did this again and it again came back only slightly improved but still noticeably off. Finally they sent me 2 lenses that were clearly used from "Borrow Lenses" and I picked one but indeed both of those were good. To Sony's credit they never questioned that I knew what i was talking about and stuck with me till I was satisfied.

    In both cases Sony eventually did the right thing but didn't seem to understand their own lenses. I would caution that its very hard to detect whether the lens is parfocal because at f4 and 18mm everything tends to look sharp even on a 17" monitor. However if you look at a chart through the viewfinder at 4x and 8x with the red peaking on it will become very obvious.

    Lenny Levy


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    #20
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    How are people powering the servo grip on the 20-120 Fujinon when using a camera like the FS7? Can you power it with simply a FS7 battery that has D-Tap out? Or do you need V-Lock batteries to do it? If that's the case, then would it make more sense to get the 20-120 without the Servo grip and instead pick up the Chrosziel motor and use the FS7's handgrip to control the lens? The Chrosziel motor can be powered with a FS7 battery that has D-Tap ports and the overall cost would be about $2,000 less.

    I'm also curious if the FS7II's newly designed locking E-mount can handle the weight of the Fujinon 20-120 without the need for lens support. It's definitely a stronger mount, but I'm not sure what's too much weight for it. I'd love to be able to run it without lens support so that I can keep my overall rig size to a minimum.


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