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    #41
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    Holy cow I watched 2 minutes of those AMR videos in a not ideal space and not ideal mindset and I still started to feel chills... crazy.


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    #42
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    It will change your life once you find your personal triggers.


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    #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    Part 2 if you liked part 1: https://www.cinema5d.com/landing-gig...career-part-2/


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    #44
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    Aug 2012
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    Adding a couple of thoughts to an already helpful collection...

    One thing that has changed in our world is the constant repurposing of old ideas and approaches. As some have already mentioned, the use of video 5 years ago has changed and will keep changing as time goes on. We are in an 'adapt or die' flow now. As such, having a business mindset with freelance and treating your skills/experience as resources for developing products is helpful. When you think this way, you can apply basic business principles to what you do. For example, your product ('Interview videos' for example) has to solve a current problem your intended (identified) customer needs. This is critical for any company that is selling wares in a grocery store, big box electronics, or online. Do you know a) who your potential customers are b) what problem they have that your resources can solve and c) can you help them see how it will help them. Get those three ideas together for each aspect of what your services are and be ready to find new applications (products).

    The other thought is to look at owning your own content as another stream of income. The changing world has made publishing and selling available to anyone with the guts to push into it. There are countless ways to do this (ASMR example above noted). Think about what you have information/passion in and find a way to explore it. If anything, this will give you insight into the whole cycle of content development, including the measurement and engagement of the media. This will help you provide more value to your clients than just handing over a finished video. If you have a hobby, guess what?! You need to invest more time in it and see how you can create content around it. It could help with a number of aspects of your life, even your current mental health issues.

    One thing I have done is to invest more time into stock video. This is for a few reasons. It helps me practice some of the areas I am weak in with my work (casting, directing, scripting, etc.). I get to collaborate with others, even if it's just talent and me. Finally, in the stock world, video can be fairly lucrative. If you dial yourself into the market, you can generate a nice little side income that will keep flowing (or trickling in). It gives me some control over my circumstances and projects to work on when I am slow. I always feel better about life when I am working, whether I am getting paid or not.

    Don't give up. Just take each day as a fresh start that is full of hope.

    -gl


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    #45
    Senior Member roxics's Avatar
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    Hey everyone.
    I know I've been MIA for the past month. Things got really busy. But I did read every reply to this thread and I really appreciated all the words of encouragement and advice everyone has given me. I've applied some of it in the last month.

    I've been busy doing a lot of shoots and edits, and even some edits I didn't shoot, where the client didn't like the initial edit from the person who shot it. Apparently I'm getting a reputation as someone who has an emotional/impactful editing style that my clients and their clients like. So that's good news.

    As for my problem client. I set some boundaries and things have gotten better. I considered dropping him, but I don't like to leave money on the table.
    Still a bit of a headache compared to the other clients, but manageable now. I'm not desperate to have him and I figure that so long as it's manageable and I'm making some coin, fine. If things get crazy, then we go our separate ways. We've barely had any in person meetings since I mentioned I roll the cost of them into my editing time.
    That said, I'm still a bit iffy about certain things he does. Like trying to roll pick-up shots for one client's shoot into the same day as another client's shoot (his clients not mine). But so long as I get paid what I want and I'm not driving all over town, that's fine.

    Things are still stressful on the life front in general, but I take one day at a time. I need to be out of my current rental house by the end of September and I'm stressed about how I'm going to get another place considering I don't have a consistent income anymore, like I've had for the last decade previously. Everything I've found is also twice the price of what I've been paying, so that's not helpful. But I don't want to sink so the only thing I can do is swim, so I'm swimming.


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    #46
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
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    Glad to hear that. I know i had no advice, but read and thought about what you were doing. Thanks for the update. Encouraging.


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    #47
    Senior Member indiawilds's Avatar
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    Just keep on beating your arms and legs in water - you will keep floating. It takes time to get all the necessary clients for comfortable revenue flow. Just don't quit. Many people have told me that after quitting they get lot of jobs.

    When the work is slow, you may try taking up some personal projects. It will help improve your creativity and different set of clients may like those. There is no fixed way of becoming successful.

    And when you feel down don't get into any intoxicants. Just come here and share and someone or the other will comment.


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