Thread: "Camera Carts"

Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 5678910 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 92
  1. Collapse Details
    #81
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    9,438
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by James0b57 View Post
    Sometimes i pack up into a sedan, and i have to stack some heavy pelicans in the back seat. Or i run out of space in the trunk and have to throw the cart in the back seat.

    I started looking at those back seat pet covers to protect the back seat. Wondering if any of you load gear into a sedan and what your solution my be?
    Pelis on the back seat scares me. If you flip or come to a hard stop the pelis will do very bad things to you. Pet cover sounds good, strapping them down securely sounds better.


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #82
    Senior Member James0b57's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    3,752
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by morgan_moore View Post
    Pelis on the back seat scares me. If you flip or come to a hard stop the pelis will do very bad things to you. Pet cover sounds good, strapping them down securely sounds better.
    Thank you for saying that. Yeah, iíll avoid loose gear in the cabin.


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #83
    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    New Orleans USA
    Posts
    1,232
    Default
    Once you go Mag-Liner you never go back. Not the most compact when folded up. But I drive a Chevy Suburban as is apparently required of all tv cameramen / women.

    mag-c_jr.jpg
    Big sources matter.


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #84
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,854
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by rob norton View Post
    I just ordered a rubbermaid camera cart. Will report back.
    That is VERY similar to some I looked at and almost bought. Looks useful. I was wishing you could get them with no-flat tires like the RNR to save weight but I couldn't find any. Thought about swapping them myself. Anyway, I ended up buying a RNR on sale so I didn't get the Rubbermaid one but may in the future if need arises.
    Please give us feedback after you use it


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #85
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,083
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by firehawk View Post
    That is VERY similar to some I looked at and almost bought. Looks useful. I was wishing you could get them with no-flat tires like the RNR to save weight but I couldn't find any. Thought about swapping them myself. Anyway, I ended up buying a RNR on sale so I didn't get the Rubbermaid one but may in the future if need arises.
    Please give us feedback after you use it
    I'm pretty sure you can swap out for these "Flatbusters" - https://www.filmtools.com/filmtools-117-609.html

    I have no-flat wheels on nearly all of the carts I have. I'd much rather give up some total capacity (not approaching the limits anyway) and never have to worry about pumping up pneumatics.

    The Filmtools product features a custom fabrication to get those swivel castors/larger wheels. I'm going to have to find someone to do the modification (different country) but plan to add something similar.

    The rubbermaid is mostly going to transport 4x massive plastic crates out of a lighting van. But I also would like to test it as a massive upgrade from the RnR when it's a one trip only type shoot.

    I own a RnR and really like it, will take them both for a spin and report back.


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #86
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    6,601
    Default
    I know plenty of guys with Rubbermaid carts. The standard move is to remove the regular casters and mount a thick plywood board to the base, to which you attach no-flats or whatever wheels you prefer. The board adds rigidity and also lowers the center of gravity which can be important for not tipping when rolling around with a bunch of stuff on the top shelf. Also cut the board so that it extends out in front of the cart by about 8" (round off the corners 'cause OUCH). This lip acts as a base for tall vertical objects such as tripods and stands. Drill a couple of holes on either side of the cart on the top shelf near the front and you can hook a bungee cord through to lash the tripods and stands in place.

    The biggest plus to the Rubbermaid solution is that it's sturdy & cheap. The biggest negative is that it doesn't collapse down for storage or transportation. You're not flying with one or even sticking it in anything smaller than a van.
    Mitch Gross
    Cinema Product Manager
    Panasonic System Solutions Company


    2 out of 2 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #87
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,083
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Gross View Post
    I know plenty of guys with Rubbermaid carts. The standard move is to remove the regular casters and mount a thick plywood board to the base, to which you attach no-flats or whatever wheels you prefer. The board adds rigidity and also lowers the center of gravity which can be important for not tipping when rolling around with a bunch of stuff on the top shelf. Also cut the board so that it extends out in front of the cart by about 8" (round off the corners 'cause OUCH). This lip acts as a base for tall vertical objects such as tripods and stands. Drill a couple of holes on either side of the cart on the top shelf near the front and you can hook a bungee cord through to lash the tripods and stands in place.

    The biggest plus to the Rubbermaid solution is that it's sturdy & cheap. The biggest negative is that it doesn't collapse down for storage or transportation. You're not flying with one or even sticking it in anything smaller than a van.
    Thanks Mitch!

    It seems like it’s more of an East coast cart is that right? I think I read that on a cinematography.com forum..

    I like that extended shelf idea. Although I’d probably add vertical walls to make an enclosed box, otherwise I might just try drilling a stand rack to the end, I need to try some combinations first.

    And yes, that’s what I love about the Rubbermaid. If you have the space for transport, you’re not paying exorbitant prices for the collapsing function.


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #88
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,083
    Default
    Still early days but here you can see a side by side - RnR vs. Rubbermaid.

    I modified the rubbermaid with 10 inch puncture proof wheels. Sorry Mitch, I didn't go with the plywood base - existing holes underneath the rubbermaid lined up perfectly with the castors I bought. Plus it says each shelf is rated at 250 lbs/113kg and I don't think I'll come close that regularly.

    carts1.jpg

    carts2.jpg


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #89
    Senior Member Bern Caughey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    4,199
    Default
    The Rubbermaids are more a East Coast thing, & NYC ACs often store theirs at the Rental Houses. LA is about Magliner mods, & the collapsable camera carts from Backstage, or Yaeger & Sons. Rubbermaids are also widely used in the larger Still Photography studios throughout the USA.

    Inovativ has made some inroads on both coasts, but are nowhere near as popular as those previously mentioned, while Rock N Rollers are most often utilized by Craft Services.

    Hampers are popular for G&E on the East Coast, & to a lesser extent in San Francisco, but don’t remember ever seeing one in LA.

    Seems the preference in carts is dictated by the ‘terrain’. In NYC, & San Francisco, the carts need to navigate elevators, & tight spaces, while in LA they regularly get dragged around beaches, deserts, & other ‘off-road’ locations.

    I currently have three carts for different uses, however they mostly sit around in storage. A Filmtools’ Camera Assistant Junior is my workhorse, & a old RnR occasionally comes out of retirement if there’s a lot of cases to be moved around on smaller crewed gigs. Also have a Fold-It Utility Cart that can be handy on rougher terrains (beaches, forests, etc) but have also seen them used for photo shoots on some of the remaining cobblestone streets of NYC.

    https://www.amazon.com/Tipke-2100-Ma.../dp/B00006LPPJ
    Last edited by Bern Caughey; 07-24-2019 at 08:23 AM.


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #90
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    1,083
    Default
    Bern with the camera cart history lesson!

    I only just came across Yaeger & Sons recently. They look like a company with a hospitality background changed industries and started making production equipment. I’m sure they’re good though.

    I’m with you, different setups for different shoots.


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 9 of 10 FirstFirst ... 5678910 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •