Thread: Welding

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    #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Liam Hall View Post
    I've shot loads of welding Sam. Expose for the highlights, watch out for flicker from the welding lamp and make sure you have a clear filter on your lens for protection from the sparks.
    So you dont feel a need for deep filtration? WHat about a compromise of a normal 3 or six stop in front of the lens?


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    #12
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    I've shot a fair amount of welding over the last few years (arc, laser and plasma) with no issues.
    I usually try to minimize directly seeing the burn by framing the shot so the actual weld is blocked by the operators hands, or I'll use some sort of foreground element on a longer lens (often placed by me) to partially obscure the weld. I usually try to expose in the middle between the arc and the reflected light, or expose for the welders mask. Exposure bracketing is the name of the game. I'll sometimes roll in a little ND for a shot, but will often use a clear filter and stop way down to capture a starburst effect.

    On a cutting table where the arc is unavoidable, I try to keep the shot moving so the arc doesn't stay in one place, or let the cutter travel through the frame. I try not to let any shot last longer than 5-7 seconds before I pan away and vary the focal length often. I tend to overlight light the area, knowing I'll be stopped down, often with an emphasis on edge lighting. In this example, the room was mixed shop light with high windows. I keyed 4000K and went 5500K temp mostly for the edge and back lighting.

    That all applies to "beauty shots." If you're tasked with shooting a "how-to" video that requires extended close ups on the actual weld, all I can say is use a cheap camera and good luck...

    Here's some stuff I shot for a client recently, sorry about the low rez. Sony F5, Osmo Pro and Dana Dolly:

    https://youtu.be/s1ba0KTXLwk
    Last edited by JCummings; 05-18-2019 at 06:28 AM.
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    #13
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    Interesting vid

    I want that machine!

    The big spark out is well over..

    Im thinking my LEDs backlighting on max (about 2-4 feet off the subject.. thats close in) .. the room would basically be 5-10 under before the weld.. indeed rimlight all the way.. lets see how I get along.


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    #14
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    Good luck!
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    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by morgan_moore View Post
    So you dont feel a need for deep filtration? WHat about a compromise of a normal 3 or six stop in front of the lens?
    Nope. Just internal or external ND.
    New Website: www.liamhall.net
    TWITTER: @FilmLiam
    INSTAGRAM: @picsbyliam


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    #16
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    Also shot a lot of welding over the years.. no problems.. biggest danger .. sparks hit the front of your lens.. that will screw the front element .. I would wear a hat too.. stay back on a long lens.. you'll be fine


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    #17
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    I’ve shot a lot of welding and cutting over the years. Never used any type of special filtering, but it’s not like I was shooting a documentary on welding or needed to see it in any special way. Knock on wood, no sensor problems, but most of it was shot with CCD’s, if that matters. I think the last time I shot some was with an Amira, though. The biggest concern, as others have said, is just don’t let any sparks hit the front of the lens. Get back and shoot ‘long lens’. I lost a filter in a junkyard, because of sparks(and I was prob. 10’ away), but I swapped out the filter and we kept going. If I had been one of those guys that doesn’t believe in front filters on their lenses, the shoot would have over(we were only like 45 mins into the day) and I would have been down a lens for who knows how long for repair and out $$$ to replace the front element.


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    #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCummings View Post
    I've shot a fair amount of welding over the last few years (arc, laser and plasma) with no issues.
    I usually try to minimize directly seeing the burn by framing the shot so the actual weld is blocked by the operators hands, or I'll use some sort of foreground element on a longer lens (often placed by me) to partially obscure the weld. I usually try to expose in the middle between the arc and the reflected light, or expose for the welders mask. Exposure bracketing is the name of the game. I'll sometimes roll in a little ND for a shot, but will often use a clear filter and stop way down to capture a starburst effect.

    On a cutting table where the arc is unavoidable, I try to keep the shot moving so the arc doesn't stay in one place, or let the cutter travel through the frame. I try not to let any shot last longer than 5-7 seconds before I pan away and vary the focal length often. I tend to overlight light the area, knowing I'll be stopped down, often with an emphasis on edge lighting. In this example, the room was mixed shop light with high windows. I keyed 4000K and went 5500K temp mostly for the edge and back lighting.

    That all applies to "beauty shots." If you're tasked with shooting a "how-to" video that requires extended close ups on the actual weld, all I can say is use a cheap camera and good luck...

    Here's some stuff I shot for a client recently, sorry about the low rez. Sony F5, Osmo Pro and Dana Dolly:

    https://youtu.be/s1ba0KTXLwk
    ^^ Nice work JCummings.


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