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    Recording in a room with reflections
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    Senior Member egproductions's Avatar
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    On occasion I'm "forced" to film in a room with, shall we say, less than ideal acoustic attributes. Sound treating, mic selection/placement, and post processing solutions aside...I was wondering if telling the talent to soften their delivery actually helps in reflections or if me needing to raise the gain to compensate for speaking softer will negate any reverberations that were reduced?
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    It could help some. Worth a try as long as the mic is close. The speaker is the source so lowering the output would in theory lessen the strength of the reverberations to make it back to the mic. Never tested so I am kind of guessing so please let us know if you have a chance to test.


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    It should make things worse. The signal to noise ratio of the voice going directly to the mic and any reflections remains the same regardless of how loud they are speaking. But a weaker voice forces you to turn up the gain, which will raise the level of the room sounds in relation to the person speaking and also increase the amplifier noise.


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    Senior Member Rick R's Avatar
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    It can help in very large rooms, like gymnasiums and such if the talent speaks lower. However, I can only recall one instance, where I asked an actor to speak in a lower volume to avoid 'exciting the room'.


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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    I would assume you are using a hypercardioid or supercardioid and NOT a shotgun? Also, there are some surprisingly good De-Reverb tools now, it's not nearly as big of a deal as it used to be. The plug-ins won't make it perfect but they can make it usable.
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    Senior Member David W. Jones's Avatar
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    I carry sound blankets which while not a perfect solution, helps to make things a little more acceptable.

    Especially helpful in sit-down interviews. Placing them on a reflective floor, and on C-stands just off camera.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F View Post
    It should make things worse. The signal to noise ratio of the voice going directly to the mic and any reflections remains the same regardless of how loud they are speaking. But a weaker voice forces you to turn up the gain, which will raise the level of the room sounds in relation to the person speaking and also increase the amplifier noise.
    EXACTLY.

    Tell them to speak LOUDER, and then DROP the gains, and that should help minimize the reflections. Get the mic as close as possible, which will let you turn the gains down lower, and that will increase the signal to noise.


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    Senior Member egproductions's Avatar
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    Yes, getting the mic close and sound blankets of course would minimize reflections being picked up. In theory David and Barry’s explanation makes a lot of sense, however there is something naggining at me that makes me think if I told the talent to talk lower instead of project, the reflections would be minimized. I can’t even hypothesis a reason why this would be true but I still have this naggining feeling like their voice wouldnt “reach” the hard surfaces as easily even though it doesnt logically make sense as far as I can tell.
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    #9
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    When in doubt, test.
    Last edited by Paul F; 03-21-2019 at 06:55 PM.


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    Senior Member egproductions's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul F View Post
    When it doubt, test.
    Yes, I'm going to have to. And sorry, I meant to credit you and Barry for your explanation. Thanks everyone.
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