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    #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh DiMauro View Post
    I use the baked in, REC 709 LUT on the GH5 menu.
    When I first started shooting with LOG I tried the Panasonic LUT in my NLE (Edius) and it was horrible. Still do not understand why the company who made the camera offered up such a poor LUT? Purchased the Craftshow for $10 and all was well. So you might want to venture beyond the Panasonic LUT just for a reference.


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    #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by morgan_moore View Post
    To use log you need to consider ...

    exposure
    the 'toe' in the curve using post

    Simply you need to set up a controlled scene with some DR and shoot it at many settings (different iris)
    You then need to take all of these shots into post and pull the curves to make the best image from each shot.

    95% of noise complainants are underexposing log footage.
    I thank you for this. The whole color grading business is certainly not for sissies. I will do this but indoors for now.
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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    #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bassman2003 View Post
    Hopefully LOG shooting will go away in close future generations. I do not like shooting with it and would rather have the camera maker get a profile right or offer RAW.

    If you are going to do anything with color grading make sure you have a good calibrated monitor in the mix. Otherwise you are making decisions based upon untruths.
    Which is exactly why I hesitate to use V-Log in the first place. My editing system does not have a proper, calibrated display monitor. I use a video card with Displayport out jacks. I have gotten by thus far with shooting high bitrates, CinelikeD (first with the Panasonic HPX250, HPX370 and now the GH5 and GH5s) and carefully lighting and exposing my scenes to the best of my ability in order to avoid any kind of extensive color grading/correction in post which, I understand, is an art which takes many years to master. I am learning as I go along.
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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    #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mothmachine View Post
    Or maybe it's infrared pollution that causes noise with too much ND? I forget which one, but since they sell ND filters with IR reduction I guess it must be infrared-caused noise (as opposed to UV radiation). Anyway it's one of those two wavelengths of light that is not visible to the human eye which nevertheless can get recorded as noise, and is the reason why it's better to use a faster shutter speed rather than more ND.
    I slap my variable ND ON TOP of my UV lens protector filter. I wonder if I just have too much "stuff" in front of my lens?
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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    #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by filmguy123 View Post
    RE: VND

    For my tastes I hate adjusting shutter for exposure on video and hate it when I see people do that. I always go for ND. I think it's fine as long as you do a few things:

    1. Buy some VNDs that are overpowered if you can so you aren't maxing it out
    2. Re-white balance anytime you make a significant change to the VND
    3. Spend the $$ on a good VND. But it doesn't have to be crazy. I've had good success with SLR Magic VND over Tiffen for minimizing color shifts. I might try out some of these once they've been on market and tested/reviewed for a while as well:

    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects...d-filters-1-11

    RE: Log VS Raw

    I think the future is undoubtedly RAW, hands down. LOG is a temporary hold over until the tech fully catches up. It's already happening today and I think will accelerate rapidly, but, I mean, fast forward some years when 12 TB SSDs are $150, 20TB HDDs are the same cost, v90 SD cards and other media are as cheap as v30 are today for double the size, etc. etc. Why would you ever not shoot RAW? Especially with all the new "smart" RAW codecs like ProRes RAW, BMD's RAW, etc. I think it will just be the defacto way to work even for quick turn projects. Because...

    RE: Grading Log / Working with RAW

    This is true about getting it right, but it has gotten exponentially easier. I mean, really, I hear a lot of people talk about all the added complexity and it just doesn't have to be that way. You really can treat it almost the same as shooting CineV if you do a batch copy/paste or adjustment layer of a LUT filter, especially if you monitor with that same LUT. You're essentially adding 30 seconds to your post workflow and using a "preset", except you can change the preset in post and/or have way more grading flexibility if you choose to. Or, just don't choose to.

    I think with RAW and LOG workflows this is going to get increasingly easier as software and hardware builds more features in intuitively. How long will it really be until Premiere recognizes metadata tags from a camera clip and can be set to auto-apply LUTs or preset RAW grades right on ingest, or in an easy flick of a switch on a per clip or per project basis, etc?
    I understand V-LOG just adds more DR, not more bitrates. Kind of like an electronic "cheat" to add more DR to a video image (believe me I'm grateful for the technology). But can't I also get by without V-LOG with a carefully, well lit scene at a high bitrate and minimal color correction/grading if I so choose?
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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    #36
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    V-LOG is a way to get the most out of the sensor in the camera. To do this you have to capture images in a sort of awkward way compared to normal profile shooting. Another thing that you can achieve with V-LOG is more accurate colors. The LUTs you use can be created to be better than the profiles in the camera. Those are the benefits - DR and more accurate color but at the expense of awkward monitoring and learning to maybe overexpose in certain circumstances. Plus more time in post.


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    #37
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    Don’t forget you are using a limited version of Vlog (Vlog-L). Caps out at 75-79 IRE which makes it harder to expose. When shooting on a GH5 I always use the built in waveform to help expose my subject properly it also helps to see the image outputted to a decent monitor (on camera or production monitor). I often change my exposure settings once I look at it on another display with the standard Panasonic LUT applied.


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    #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bassman2003 View Post
    V-LOG is a way to get the most out of the sensor in the camera. To do this you have to capture images in a sort of awkward way compared to normal profile shooting. Another thing that you can achieve with V-LOG is more accurate colors. The LUTs you use can be created to be better than the profiles in the camera. Those are the benefits - DR and more accurate color but at the expense of awkward monitoring and learning to maybe overexpose in certain circumstances. Plus more time in post.
    I hesitate to stray from my tried-and-true on set monitoring to which I've grown accustomed. I don't trust myself enough in post to use V-Log L. The other day I experimented with the V-Log L I shot and literally agonized myself to death tweaking it in post, wondering if my non-calibrated monitor was giving me a close representation of how it will look on YOUTUBE, a TV or the big screen. This is insane!
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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    #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh DiMauro View Post
    But can't I also get by without V-LOG with a carefully, well lit scene at a high bitrate and minimal color correction/grading if I so choose?
    Yes but what's the point?


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    #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by soarprod View Post
    Don’t forget you are using a limited version of Vlog (Vlog-L). Caps out at 75-79 IRE which makes it harder to expose. When shooting on a GH5 I always use the built in waveform to help expose my subject properly it also helps to see the image outputted to a decent monitor (on camera or production monitor). I often change my exposure settings once I look at it on another display with the standard Panasonic LUT applied.
    I discovered when using V-Log L my waveform maxes out at 80% and I kept the highlights just at 80%, thinking that is what I am supposed to do. It's a scary thing not trusting new technology when it takes u away from what you are accustomed to using. I need to just keep using V-Log L until I develop the confidence to trust what I am seeing.
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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