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    #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by filmguy123 View Post
    Yes but what's the point?
    Taking advantage of Panasonic's normal color gamut in HD with a high bitrate, knowing exactly what I'm getting, as opposed to squeezing out two more stops of dynamic range in V-Log L with all of the hand wringing that goes along with it. Kinda sucks being a V-Log L neophyte. None of the big boys wanna hang out with me :-(
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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    #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh DiMauro View Post
    I hesitate to stray from my tried-and-true on set monitoring to which I've grown accustomed. I don't trust myself enough in post to use V-Log L. The other day I experimented with the V-Log L I shot and literally agonized myself to death tweaking it in post, wondering if my non-calibrated monitor was giving me a close representation of how it will look on YOUTUBE, a TV or the big screen.
    I understand the hesitation to move away from something one is accustomed to. I wouldn't do this on something mission critical. Maybe just set aside a day, some day when you have time, to commit to experimenting. TBH it's not that hard, it's just a matter of taking a smidge of time to experiment and read a little. The juice is worth the squeeze - I can't image not shooting in LOG modes in 2019, *that* seems insane to me!

    The easier way to get started:

    Get Leeming LUT
    Install the monitoring LUT on your GH5 monitor and/or external monitor, for WYSIWYG monitoring (What you see is what you get)
    Import Premiere. Use adjustment layer with Leeming LUT applied.
    It looks just like you saw on your monitor.
    End of story.

    Now, play around with a couple different luts. See what the footage likes when you disable the monitoring LUT and reenable the monitoring LUT. How the zebras and exposure respond. Try under and over exposing. Try a couple of different LUTs out. Read a Barry Green article on vlog. Shoot a couple CineD / CineV vs the same shot on Leeming LUT / LOG tests.

    All of this could be done in an afternoon.

    Sure, you have to get a little "uncomfortable" learning something new but that isn't that also par for the course in this industry? It's uncomfortbale to switch any piece of camera, gear, software, workflow. We do so when the benefits of doing such outweigh whatever the learning curve here is.

    IMO, the learning curve to make LOG footage match your flexibility with non LOG footage is very low. The benefits are very high.

    BEYOND THAT - you open a door to a steeper learning curve where the rabbit hole goes endlessly deep on how advanced you want to get with grading. But you don't need to touch that to already be better off that a preset profile, and you can dabble into certain topics on an as needed basis. You don't need to understand everything about electricity to reap the benefits of flipping on the lights.


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    #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh DiMauro View Post
    Taking advantage of Panasonic's normal color gamut in HD with a high bitrate, knowing exactly what I'm getting, as opposed to squeezing out two more stops of dynamic range in V-Log L with all of the hand wringing that goes along with it.
    Some people like to make Vlog sound harder than it is. The best way to learn is just do. See above post, just go play for a day.

    With a monitoring LUT you still know exactly what you're getting. A two stop increase is MASSIVE, you've seen the curves right? For example, if you get 1024 brightness values and you have 2 stops more than that... that's 2048 values at +1 stop, 4,096 values at +2 stops... it's literally 4 times the brightness range. That's not squeezing out a couple more drops, that's completely changing the game on how much range is being captured.

    I don't know what you mean by hand wringing, unless you aren't doing it right. You're using a good monitoring LUT and matching that to the LUT you use in post? That literally does all of the work for you.


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    #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by filmguy123 View Post
    I understand the hesitation to move away from something one is accustomed to. I wouldn't do this on something mission critical. Maybe just set aside a day, some day when you have time, to commit to experimenting. TBH it's not that hard, it's just a matter of taking a smidge of time to experiment and read a little. The juice is worth the squeeze - I can't image not shooting in LOG modes in 2019, *that* seems insane to me!

    The easier way to get started:

    Get Leeming LUT
    Install the monitoring LUT on your GH5 monitor and/or external monitor, for WYSIWYG monitoring (What you see is what you get)
    Import Premiere. Use adjustment layer with Leeming LUT applied.
    It looks just like you saw on your monitor.
    End of story.

    Now, play around with a couple different luts. See what the footage likes when you disable the monitoring LUT and reenable the monitoring LUT. How the zebras and exposure respond. Try under and over exposing. Try a couple of different LUTs out. Read a Barry Green article on vlog. Shoot a couple CineD / CineV vs the same shot on Leeming LUT / LOG tests.

    All of this could be done in an afternoon.

    Sure, you have to get a little "uncomfortable" learning something new but that isn't that also par for the course in this industry? It's uncomfortbale to switch any piece of camera, gear, software, workflow. We do so when the benefits of doing such outweigh whatever the learning curve here is.

    IMO, the learning curve to make LOG footage match your flexibility with non LOG footage is very low. The benefits are very high.

    BEYOND THAT - you open a door to a steeper learning curve where the rabbit hole goes endlessly deep on how advanced you want to get with grading. But you don't need to touch that to already be better off that a preset profile, and you can dabble into certain topics on an as needed basis. You don't need to understand everything about electricity to reap the benefits of flipping on the lights.
    Let me see if I get this: Using an in-camera LUT helps me see the footage normally, but is it also burned in so that's what it looks like when I import it into Premiere? OR, need I import the same LUT into Premiere, apply it and I'm done? Can it actually be that easy? No tweaking?
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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    #45
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    Yes, it can be that easy but it needs to be the correct LUT(s).

    I have been applying all kinds of LUTs to all kinds of footage for 5+ years, and I'm 99% there with my final products (only do minor tweaks for difficult lighting or human error).

    And no camera burns in a LUT into the image besides a few (the GH5 is not one of them).

    Most people/productions use LUTs on an external monitor (or built-in assisting looks/LUTs in the camera) to help see what a final picture may look like, but the footage that is imported is flat.


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    #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by filmguy123 View Post
    Some people like to make Vlog sound harder than it is. The best way to learn is just do. See above post, just go play for a day.

    With a monitoring LUT you still know exactly what you're getting. A two stop increase is MASSIVE, you've seen the curves right? For example, if you get 1024 brightness values and you have 2 stops more than that... that's 2048 values at +1 stop, 4,096 values at +2 stops... it's literally 4 times the brightness range. That's not squeezing out a couple more drops, that's completely changing the game on how much range is being captured.

    I don't know what you mean by hand wringing, unless you aren't doing it right. You're using a good monitoring LUT and matching that to the LUT you use in post? That literally does all of the work for you.
    My God! I think I get it now. Did you know the GH5 automatically applies any installed LUTS to a connected monitor (through a menu setting), negating the need to install the LUT on the monitor itself? And this same LUT you speak of can be installed on Premiere? Apply it to clip and VOILA! It looks like what I saw on my on set monitor? Is that it?
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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    #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    Yes, it can be that easy but it needs to be the correct LUT(s).

    I have been applying all kinds of LUTs to all kinds of footage for 5+ years, and I'm 99% there with my final products (only do minor tweaks for difficult lighting or human error).

    And no camera burns in a LUT into the image besides a few (the GH5 is not one of them).

    Most people/productions use LUTs on an external monitor (or built-in assisting looks/LUTs in the camera) to help see what a final picture may look like, but the footage that is imported is flat.
    Is that "Leeming" LUT FilmGuy spoke of a good one to buy then?
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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    #48
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    OH, did I forget to say I also own an Atomos Ninja Inferno? (You're either all rolling your eyes now or laughing your arses off). I believe the Inferno has internal tweaking... Go easy on me, gents.
    Interesting if true. And interesting anyway.


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    #49
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    It is a popular one (Leeming). If no one else mentioned it earlier, download Resolve (free) and YouTube how to apply LUTs to your clips inside that software. They provide you a bunch of built-in ones and you'll be able to see how they affect your clips and you may start to understand a bit better.

    Unfortunately now everyone is selling their own LUT so it's difficult to know what's good, but there are also packs out there that may provide you 200-300 (different cameras) that you can try as well.

    I never follow the rules and will easily use an Olympus LUT on a RED camera (just trying to make a point) if it looks good.

    The best part is experimenting (which is when you really learn) and Resolve is one of the only free ways you can do that besides other built-in NLE LUTs.


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    #50
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    You can burn in LUTs with the Inferno. Now that's where it gets really complicated!

    (And it's something I do myself because it can be amazing if you're sure that's the look you're going with.)


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