Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. Collapse Details
    Filmakers should consider joining theatre company
    #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    indiana/austin tx
    Posts
    585
    Default
    With the availability of affordable gear one path for filmmakers might be working with a theatre company. Stories and actors are the foundation of narrative films. Maybe working with actors and writing should be the top advice for newbie filmmakers instead of default gear advice (which obviously has a place). Some of the forum discussions of late have many working professionals turning away from expensive gear toward good enough and easier to use cams like the xt3 or sonys. Seeing how well batutta did on the sound for his feature with a inexpensive mic( I picked up a used one for 15$ ( just showing knowledge and planning can get you good results w cheap gear).


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #2
    Senior Member Batutta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Planet 10
    Posts
    7,423
    Default
    For sure having some foundational training in writing and directing is a better place to start for a filmmaker, and theater can provide that. I got it at college and spent most of my early years focused on writing. I backed into the technical aspects of filmmaking out of necessity. It seems to me this forum is split between two camps, aspiring filmmakers trying to make their first films, and working professionals. The gear needs of those two groups are pretty different. The aspiring filmmakers generally take an attitude of good enough (or as good as I can afford right now), and generally the gear is used intermittently and only needs to last one or two projects. A working professional needs something that's going to last, and is going to work every time, day in, day out and produces quality that doesn't need to be extensively massaged in post. Working for a client is different than working for yourself and I don't fault the gearheads on this forum for always chasing better and better, as anything that needs to be fixed later comes at a cost to the client, and that means you might not get the job next time.
    "Money doesn't make films...You just do it and take the initiative." - Werner Herzog


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    indiana/austin tx
    Posts
    585
    Default
    Agree Batutta, everything you're saying makes sense. Also many other ways to reach ones filmmaking goals. Some advantages of working with a theatre company 1. Around folks who are going out of their way to work at the craft. Same thought as not casting someone on micro budget level who can't be bothered to show up for an audition or send a tape. 2. They deal with promotion and getting buts in the seats. Saw a nice local feature with a 22 year old. He had the support of the theatre department and a family members theatre company. It's well on its way to making back its modest budget from screening around the region. 3. Very easy to pull a table read together. One of the things that is overlooked by many. 4. A chance to learn some minimum skills in hair makeup costumes. Some differences but basically the same skills. 5.access to Props, costumes, or at least getting to know someone that can find anything for low or no cost. Every theatre company has this person.


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    indiana/austin tx
    Posts
    585
    Default
    You also might find a great writer / collaborator.


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    229
    Default
    100% agreed with the positives for filmmakers of joining a theater company. One of benefit I'd add to the list - Theater is F%$#!ng AWESOME.

    I've been in this theater company for many years: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAByrinth_Theater_Company
    A quick look at the list of members shows more than a few very talented filmmakers began in theater. In past years, no matter what a member was working on - either an enormous blockbuster or a tiny, micro-budget indie, we'd get together every summer and go away to a small college and develop new plays. The wondrous, spontaneous stuff that happened in those development sessions are my favorite memories of anything I've experienced in this industry.

    An example of the positive peer pressure of a theater company - I'd never written anything. On a whim, I did a group writing exercise with some friends at one of these summer workshops. Turns out the writing wasn't half bad. An established playwright read it and said, "I have good news and bad news. The good news is, you're a writer. The bad news is, you're a writer." The artistic director put me on a deadline to have my play - that I'd not written - read publicly the next summer. An incredible and terrifying gift. I delivered the play on deadline and have never stopped writing. I would not make my living as a screenwriter without my theater company experience.

    Couldn't imagine how hard it would be to grind out a writer/filmmaker's life without theater. Theater is refuge.


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    indiana/austin tx
    Posts
    585
    Default
    Right on Kohl! Another positive, many colleges and theater companies for many of their productions do color blind casting which gives great actors a chance to shine in roles that may not have been considered for if going strictly by writers intentions . Leading filmmakers later on tend to think outside the box in casting their films if possible. By being in a theatre group it got me on to medium and big budget films directly from the theatre company I was involved with. I don't consider myself an actor but I got several nicely paid roles without auditioning because a casting director was in our company and needed someone last minute and thought of me. It's great to work with generous of spirit artists.


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,543
    Default
    Unfortunately, it doesn't always work. I had the same idea about 10 years ago and attempted to go to
    a local theatre as I thought it would be good to network with actors and others and maybe collaborate
    on some sort of short film. Alas, I was told they were all union actors and the point of contact that I
    was talking to refused to even let me pass on my contact info to see if any of them were interested.
    It was pretty much a non starter, I was told non of them were allowed to do things like that.


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    indiana/austin tx
    Posts
    585
    Default
    Many well established theatre companies would love help evaluating new submissions. Chicago has 100s of storefront theatres many doing great work without much reward, many non union and most would love some help. It probably will take some work to find the right fit wherever one is located and the older one gets the less time one has.


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #9
    Senior Member hscully's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Hawthorne, NY
    Posts
    1,826
    Default
    I participated in a Master Class at the LAB some years ago as an actor. The culture that encourages artists the way Kohl described it is tremendous. Maybe it is because theater companies are anchored to a place, or that films are individual projects whose organization doesn’t persist beyond the life of that project but the sense of community in a theater company doesn’t really have an analog in filmmaking. I think the goals are different. Theater companies are good with a successful run. Filmmakers seem to be interested primarily in trading up into some promise of “industry” interest. You don’t have reperatory film making.


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    592
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by alaskacameradude View Post
    Unfortunately, it doesn't always work. I had the same idea about 10 years ago and attempted to go to
    a local theatre as I thought it would be good to network with actors and others and maybe collaborate
    on some sort of short film. Alas, I was told they were all union actors and the point of contact that I
    was talking to refused to even let me pass on my contact info to see if any of them were interested.
    It was pretty much a non starter, I was told non of them were allowed to do things like that.
    Try another theater then - there are more than just that one out there.


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •