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    #21
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    What are the speeds on that? Maybe I should just get a 48TB RAID 5 or something for main media storage? Aren't read speeds 800-900mb/s?

    That would be faster than a SATA SSD for read time... I assume random reads are slower, but not that useful? Write is solid, but must writing would be for Nvme cache drive.

    Price is higher for the large RAID setup up front, but much lower overall than SSD.

    What would I be missing out on VS an SSD?


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    #22
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    I always recommend FreeNAS to build your own, or a FreeNAS mini if you want to buy one. With 8 spinning drives I get terabit+ speeds from the latest machine I built (HGST drives) in a RAID 5 like configuration. That said, I currently only have two gigabit ethernet connections (aggregated) so a total of 1GB up and down to a single client.

    I recently tested this specific server with 10 clients running two streams of XDcam EX (35mbps) or 20 streams. It had no problem keeping up with the 500+ mbps that I was pulling and probably could have used all 25 computers with the same test successfully. How it would work with 400mbps streams, I have no idea, but I bet it would handle two of them to a single client (limit of a single gigabit connection). My clients are all 1gb connection.

    This is a low end SuperMicro server with dual XEON processors, 32GB of RAM, eight 1tb SATA HGST drives, and onboard Intel NICs. Cost was around $3000 with 10 drives (2 spares). FreeNAS is FREE so no cost but time. I can swap drives in this to build it up to 112tb (raw with 14tb drives) without risking the data, just swap and rebuild one drive at a time, when the last drive is rebuilt, the pool will be bigger. More spindles (more drives) is faster, but build them in groups of 8. It is suggested to run 8 drives per "raid", then you can stripe the groups together to build bigger (and fast) storage pools.

    It is suggested that you normally want to go with faster ethernet connections over multiple connections due to the way that FreeNAS handles aggregated connections. Four 1gb connections aggregated between both server and client will not equal a 4gb connection. But if you have that same four connections aggregated to the switch and four 1gb clients, then each client could get their own 1gb worth and if a connection fails, then clients would start to share the remaining connections (in theory and mostly in practice). If I were building for my own use, I would build at least 8 drives, and at least a single 10gb network connection on the server. And no, there are Thunderbolt or USB 3.1 "client" cards that you can buy for a server (yet). Thunderbolt to 10gb NIC would be the best way (or 10gb card in a workstation), then a crossover Cat6a or better cable (or optical fiber) direct connect to the server would be easiest for most people.


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    #23
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    Sorry, the above should have been terabyte+ speeds, the factor of 8 wouldn't have been impressive.


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    #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by filmguy123 View Post
    What are the speeds on that? Maybe I should just get a 48TB RAID 5 or something for main media storage? Aren't read speeds 800-900mb/s?

    That would be faster than a SATA SSD for read time... I assume random reads are slower, but not that useful? Write is solid, but must writing would be for Nvme cache drive.

    Price is higher for the large RAID setup up front, but much lower overall than SSD.

    What would I be missing out on VS an SSD?
    I don't have mine up and running yet, so anything I say about speed won't be real world based on my setup. However, you can do a bit of research based on reviews others have made. Search Reduser for QNAP. Take a look at Bob Zelin's posts and his website. Also, here is a video from Max Yuriyev with actual speed numbers for his comparable QNAP setup. 10GB Ethernet is the way to go, or TB3.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3RTWs_qMc1E


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    #25
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    So the opinion here would be definitely a QNAP over a standard Promise or G-Tech RAID drive bay? Even for a single at home editing station?


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    #26
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    Depends what you are doing. Are you making money with this and need the reliability of a RAID type system, or just knocking personal stuff together where a USB3.1 drive will work.


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    #27
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    $$$$$$$$$$

    But the QNAP is $$$$$$$. Been learning about it, looks great, but $$$$$$$$!!!

    (please excuse my eloquent language) ;)


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    #28
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    One big question with a QNAP is, how reliable is it with a RAID 5 or RAID 6? That essential serves as my on-site backup, yes?

    Put another way: currently I have a stack of externals as my on-site backup to my HDDs. And then I have a stack of duplicate externals as a 2nd backup copy, stored in a seperate physical location.

    With the QNAP, my on-site backup is taken care of, then I just need to have an off-site backup - which could either be a stack of externals, or a duplicate QNAP. Correct?


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    #29
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    Storage speed is kind of tough to know how much money you want to put into it. Do you do a lot of multicam shoots? 2 or 6 cameras? Big bitrate codecs? A doubling of your realistic throughput for your average job might give you a starting point to the base speed you need. I know people stating they can edit 4-5 camera compressed codec streams from a single hard drive. Add a simple software RAID and you have quite a bit of headroom.

    To me, the limiting factor is size of the edit drive. I have a simple internal software 12GB RAID and at times it is overflowing if I need to do a lot of rendering for Neat Video or a 6 camera shoots. But, the RAID speed is not holding anything back and it is only two 6TB spinners. RAIDs run a lot quicker if they are not full with less than 50% being optimal. So it is worth a thought to go bigger rather than faster/more expensive.

    In the digital world, I always think of any hard drive purchase turns into two because you need a backup. So if you spend big on a super fast edit drive setup, you will need to spend even bigger to add the backup for it. This keeps me focused that I am not a big production house, just a one man band with a simple software RAID and a lot of backup discs! Good luck with your search.


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    #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by filmguy123 View Post
    One big question with a QNAP is, how reliable is it with a RAID 5 or RAID 6? That essential serves as my on-site backup, yes?

    Put another way: currently I have a stack of externals as my on-site backup to my HDDs. And then I have a stack of duplicate externals as a 2nd backup copy, stored in a seperate physical location.

    With the QNAP, my on-site backup is taken care of, then I just need to have an off-site backup - which could either be a stack of externals, or a duplicate QNAP. Correct?
    The QNap does NOT serve as your backup. A single raid array is never a backup strategy.

    However, with Raid 5 you can lose one of the 8 disks and keep working on your project. With Raid 6 you can lose up to 2 disks and keep working. The raid is there to provide the combination of speed, throughput, storage quantity (so that you're not shuffling stuff around), AND the ability to keep working while the downed disk(s) are replaced and rebuilding in the case of bad news.

    You still need to backup the whole thing, so even more $$$$. However, your backup solution does not need to have the same performance specs with regard to speed, etc. So, get a cheeper setup for backup if you want to keep costs down. If you then also want offsite, then you get a third. I don't know very many people who do offsite backup with no on-site backup. It's usually three tiers as you are doing with your loose bunch of disks, or two tiers with the backups on site...which doesn't help in the case of theft, fire, meteorites, etc.

    Your question about QNAP vs Pegasus/G-raid, etc: It's really a question of whether you want to enter into the NAS server world, or have a Raid setup that is essentially acts as a single volume, directly attached. You can't just connect to the QNAP as a volume. It's a server, which is more complicated, but has a lot more bells and whistles (if you need them) and is particularly effective if/when you want to have multiple users or need to access files remotely or grant access to others remotely.


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