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    #11
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    Yeah but that’s not really a “colorist”...that may be what many of us do but personally I would never call myself a colorist doing that. I would only do so if I felt fully versed in proper techniques and workflow and felt confident my work was within spec of whatever destination the client required.


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    #12
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    Really interesting answers here...totally different from his perspective and mine also ( read expectations ).....Thanks


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    #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Bass View Post
    Yeah but that’s not really a “colorist”...that may be what many of us do but personally I would never call myself a colorist doing that. I would only do so if I felt fully versed in proper techniques and workflow and felt confident my work was within spec of whatever destination the client required.
    Artistic positions like this usually fall under the same category with very grey guidelines. Like the adage of throwing some paint on a canvas and calling it "art", or like the aforementioned example of a person buying a camera and a few lights and being a "DP".

    OTOH, someone giving someone cough drops wouldn't be called a doctor.

    In the traditional sense, I think most of us would agree someone pressing a button in software for a generated look is not a "real" colorist (at least to us), but it doesn't matter because the world is changing.

    Even though being a colorist is a skilled and technical position, the definition of a job is only as useful as its purpose.

    If the tasks you complete to earn a living will be computerized, it doesn't matter what the true definition of your job is, ha.


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    #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cristian Mihai View Post
    stable job





    Your premise is deeply flawed.


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    #15
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    The democratisation of film software and equipment that has been happening for well over a decade now has lowered the threshold until non existent for entering the business. As a self thought individual, this is something I've taken advantage of myself.

    But what mostly happens is that as more people are starting to create content or provide services for "cheap", new customers are popping up looking for "cheap" content; i.e people who couldn't previously afford some services are now buying them from people who couldn't previously provide them—it's almost a closed eco system. It's very rare that someone with little experience and basic equipment will be able to sell services to large established customers.

    To work as a commercial colorist you will have to setup a grading suite. In most cases this includes a room to receive clients, a pretty powerful dual gfx workstation with one to two monitors plus a color accurate proof monitor (plus a large client OLED TV, or quality projection). Add to this separate monitors for scopes and perhaps a hardware panel to control the software. And at least 5.1 audio of course. It will cost more than $300.

    You can say that Resolve installs fine on a laptop and you can import, grade and export—hence you have a color suite! But do you really, though?

    Not that this matters all that much. The real differentiator will be WHO you are. Some people who bought the 5D mkII are shooting on large sets with Alexas now and some of them are doing favours for friends of friends shooting with GH5s for 3 days for $800...

    It DOES have to do with your ability, but much more so it has to do with your mentality and your communications skills.
    @andreemarkefors


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    #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cristian Mihai View Post
    .... I told him that a colorist can work from home and is a stable job and well paid. He ask me how much ... Can you please give me some insights ?
    The average pay is $75k according to one survey, but that number is meaningless as there are different markets. The majority of real colorist work is done in post production houses at the facility. If you can get a staff job at a post house, then it would be stable.... but for how long. As with most everything in this business, there are constant reorganizations, downsizing, acquisitions, mergers, cost cutting. I think there are few stable media jobs.

    It would take years of internship and assistant work to get to the level of a respected and well paid/stable colorist job. Good luck getting an internship and job at a post house. I worked at a very respected post house. The old joke about starting in the mail room was true for one person who had a film degree. He worked in the mail room for 4 years and finally got a boring job of doing transfers of audio from one media to another. All the other jobs were locked by people who have spent their entire careers at that post house. There were two fortunate interns that did quite well and one of them won an Oscar. But that is a sand pebble on the beach.

    I'd stay with IT, continue to get better education and training, and climb up the IT ladder.

    The number of good paying colorist jobs is infinitesimal compared to IT jobs. IT is a very broad category, but IT jobs can easily go over $100k and well beyond that.
    Last edited by Paul F; 01-30-2019 at 10:56 PM.


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