Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Collapse Details
    i bought a refurbed canon sl2 and i'm impressed with it's vid!
    #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    1,130
    Default
    i bought a refurbed canon sl2 and i'm impressed with it's vid!

    there i said it:

    in this era of "must have full frame" and "can't live without 4k" and "dual card slots or no go", i bought a cheap canon sl2 crop sensor for access to it's dpaf (dual pixel auto focus).

    in my initial 1080/p (no 4k!) 60p/30p/24p talking head shots, i must say, i really like the look of the vid.

    dpaf really does a good job locking onto the subject as they move slightly here and there while being interviewed.

    i do wish i could monitor the audio with headphones.

    but there are work-arounds.

    i'm no luddite but i'm impressed by well done, old-school, out-of-fashion 1080p.

    ymmv

    be well.

    rob
    smalltalk productions/nyc
    the story is never black & white
    it takes Smalltalk to reveal the color

    smalltalk.productions


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #2
    Moderator Alex H.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    7,938
    Default
    The camera is just a tool. If you can get what you want out of it, what else matters? And if it’s paid work and the client is happy, bonus points.

    I still shoot lower-budget stuff on my EOS 80D and I love what I can do with that camera.
    Nobody notices audio... until it's not there.

    Find Me on Instagram


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    1,130
    Default
    i made and sold footage that was standard def.

    i was thrilled.

    the client was thrilled.

    the invoice was paid.

    i made and sold footage that was early version high def/720p.

    i was thrilled.

    the client was thrilled.

    the invoice was paid.

    i made and sold footage that was high definition 1920 x 1080.

    i was thrilled.

    the client was thrilled.

    the invoice was paid.

    i made and sold footage that was 4k/420.

    i was thrilled.

    the client was thrilled.

    the invoice was paid.

    to take a step back, or even several steps back, and find a camera that can deliver so much for less than $400 with a pretty decent kit lens, has me shaking my head.

    in part, wow! what a great time to be making media with such groovy tools.

    on the other hand, the barrier to entry to media making has gotten really low, $400 near pro level low, especially if the client relies on the web as their distribution vehicle.

    wild times.

    thumbs up.

    rob
    smalltalk productions/nyc
    the story is never black & white
    it takes Smalltalk to reveal the color

    smalltalk.productions


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    513
    Default
    4k is overkill for most uses. We don't even shoot 4k on most big-budget Hollywood sets unless it is for Netflix and they force us to. The Alexa Mini @ 2k is my most used camera these days, for big projects that millions watch.

    This 4k or bust attitude on the internet is a triumph of marketing, nothing more - it's not warranted by the actual work, especially if the tradeoff is the crappy skintones of Sony or Panasonic consumer gear.


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    4,585
    Default
    It's always important to consider and mention that the ALEXA outputs a high quality over-sampled 2K image from a 3K-ish sensor.

    The camera wouldn't look the same and wouldn't be used for as long as it has (and is) if it had a 1080p sensor. They made the right camera for the right price at the right time that looked the best, and the snowball hasn't stopped rolling since.


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    513
    Default
    First, none of the cameras discussed in this subforum has just a 1080 sensor - including the one that's the focus of this thread.

    That said, you are right about the variability of the quality of pixels, but it's about far more than just resolution - color is the real biggie here imho. I used to often refer to it as a difference between more low-quality pixels versus fewer high-quality pixels. Since most of my work is shooting people, skintones are of utmost importance and I'll choose 1 Canon consumer pixel over 4 Sony/Panasonic consumer pixels just about any day.

    Another often missed aspect is the fact that later Canon DSLR/mirrorless offerings are far far better in video mode than the earlier models. Most reviewers tend to take a cursory look at the video capabilities of these cameras and conclude that it's the same as the 5D2 - which just isn't true. I happen to own 24 EOS-Ms that I use for VR work and I've found the video quality of them to be far better than the earlier generation of Canon, and I'm astounded that reviews (and hence the internet in general) are completely oblivious to this fact - likely due to said reviewers being fooled by numbers.


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    4,585
    Default
    I agree about the Canon cameras being better; day and night compared to the initial years.


    Reply With Quote
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •