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    #11
    Moderator Alex H.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noiz2 View Post
    Are you sure? when I looked at the specs at B&H they only listed one jack and it was a mic in.

    If it has a headphone out that isn't also the mic in then my point is moot on the monitoring.
    Positive.

    B&H specs are occasionally inaccurate (rather, incomplete) and the product photos don’t show the connection covers opened. It took looking up third-party reviews to find it, but there are several out there with detailed pictures.
    Nobody notices audio... until it's not there.

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    #12
    Senior Member PegLeg Media's Avatar
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    thanks for all the feedback guys, you all are definitely thinking on the more professional side. I currently film this project with a $26 lavaliere going straight into my sony a7iii, the audio is good and i dont even need to improve the quality from here. I just hate MIC'ing people, having hair/clothes rub on it and the little extra time it takes than if i had a boom set up at all times i could just plug in.

    So i already have a c-stand and a boom to hold the mic in place, im not actually planning to put the mic on the camera. So what i am thinking is maybe the senn mk600 and the tascam dr70. This will allow me to run the mic to the recorder for interviews and bigger projects. Then when i do my quick unimportant blogs i can just run the sennheiser and a cheap lav with the xlr adapter into the tascam into the camera.


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    #13
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    I'd suggest a Sound Devices MixPre from eBay. Run from the tape out socket of the MixPre to camera using this https://www.amazon.com/Koss-155954-V.../dp/B00001P4XH In the past I ran this exact combination into 3.5mm input on a Canon HF100 camcorder and got great audio recording musical theatre. Use mic recommended by previous posters or your lav with the adapter someone else posted earlier.
    Depending on your budget you might consider the newer MixPre-D, with an accessory bracket, which allows you to mount it on tripod under camera. Mixpre-D also has a seperate dedicated output to feed DSLR that Mixpre does not, per Sound Devices "dedicated consumer mic-level on a locking TA3 connector (designed specifically for DSLR-type inputs".
    Either mixer can feed XLR output to a recorder e.g. Tascam Dr-60d Mkii at a future stage if needed.
    Mixpre-D used prices dropped when Sound Devices released the Mixpre 3 a while back (that device I believe can mix three chanels, record them and output a 2 chanel mix to your camera via a 3.5mm connector per the manual the output gain may be adjustable to suit your camera.) It is however more expensive.


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    #14
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    I wonder, for the use case you are describing if you wouldn’t be better off with the following:

    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ...lr_box_mi.html

    Let’s you feed into The A7iii with some decent wired mics. Or see if anyone is offering up old juiced link gear for resale.
    Chris Bernard
    Dangerous Amateur
    Chicago, IL


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    #15
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    This cheap Beachtek should be great for most situations, depending on your needs. I use one running a wireless lav in the left channel and a boom on the right channel (It provides phantom power). Works great if you don't need something super fancy and no syncing in post. Just do some testing with your camera(s) and mic(s) to see how they respond to the signal and note the settings accordingly. I got great results with a Blackmagic Micro and this together for a simple sit down interview.


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    #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjauch View Post
    you might consider the newer MixPre-D, with an accessory bracket, which allows you to mount it on tripod under camera. Mixpre-D also has a seperate dedicated output to feed DSLR that Mixpre does not, per Sound Devices "dedicated consumer mic-level on a locking TA3 connector (designed specifically for DSLR-type inputs".
    Yup. Once you drop the external recorder requirement, a used MixPre-D feeding the camera is usually the cleanest solution to the OP's problem. It allows one to minimize the effects of the audio internals of the camera, and provides three things that are really needed to get good audio -- excellent mic preamps, excellent limiter (don't underestimate the value of good limiters), and excellent metering.

    I use a MixPre-D to feed a crappy six+ year old handycam when I need a small and light kit and it does an amazingly good job with the audio.
    Last edited by Bruce Watson; 11-18-2018 at 02:21 PM.


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    #17
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    ^ Truth from Bruce.

    And if you need three channels, a 302 will do the trick. More that anything else, I like the metering on the older SD gear with really bright LED's. When my 302 or 744 hits the red, you know it! The new gear with strictly LCD metering is not nearly as nice IMHO, even if the new stuff has more features or even better audio. The usability is key for me so I don't plan on retiring my vintage gear anytime soon. And the SD stuff is made to last forever; I hope SD continues to support it as that is the only reason I would contemplate a change.

    And if you're a buyer, used SD gear like the MixPres and 302's have dropped in price recently, so maybe more within reach on an economy budget.


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    #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ggrantly View Post
    A few things:

    Compared to your visual equipment budget, your stated desire to get GOOD audio for $500 is pretty anemic. Just sayin....

    Rode making the best on camera mics is wrong headed thinking since no on-camera mic will sound great except compared to other on-camera mics, which won't be very good due to the distance from the source.
    1) I agree, there is a massive MASSIVE imbalance in priorities here in visuals vs audio! Hugely out of whack.

    2) yup, relying upon an on camera mic is the most common awful audio mistake newbies make.



    My ultra ultra ultra frugal almost no budget audio suggestion:

    Deity S Mic 2 + Zoom F4 (around US$350ish secondhand, only a small increase over the almost non-existent $200 budget given but is so so much much much better than the best $200 recorder such as a Tascam DR60Dmk2. Or if going secondhand as well, then the Tascam DR70Dmk2 would be the best sub $200ish recorder for secondhand. But why get it? When the F4 is in another league entirely)

    Or for a very small bump in budget, you could go for the Zoom F8n (you might appreciate the automix function for extremely quick turn arounds with multiple speakers)
    Am a Sound Recordist in New Zealand: http://ironfilm.co.nz/sound/
    Follow my vlog and adventures in sound: https://www.youtube.com/c/SoundSpeeding


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    #19
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    I've noticed a few times the MixPre-D got mentioned in this thread.

    For many years the MixPre-D (or the earlier original MixPre) was an excellent first class choice.

    But when the Tascam DR60D / DR70D / DR701D came out then the MixPreD started to lose its relevance for many people.

    Then the final nails hammered into the coffin was when the Zoom F8/F4/F8n and Sound Devices MixPre3/6 came out, then the MixPre-D lost 95% of its relevance for this purpose for most people.

    I reckon the same holds true for most other mini mixers people consider mounting under the camera, their time is past and no longer relevant in nearly 2019 when we've got better devices that are work as greater mixer/recorder combos for very very little money in a compact little body.
    Am a Sound Recordist in New Zealand: http://ironfilm.co.nz/sound/
    Follow my vlog and adventures in sound: https://www.youtube.com/c/SoundSpeeding


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    #20
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    From my experience, I respectfully disagree with IronFilm's perspective.

    I have two "vintage" SD mixers - a 302 and 442. I was early in line to purchase a MixPre-6 when it was released last year, thinking it could replace both older mixers for most of my work. I record to the camera about 90% of the time when shooting video, but also do some audio-only radio interviews and music recording projects.

    The MixPre-6 succeeds magnificently as a recorder with four mixable inputs, and as a computer interface. But after using it awhile, I decided to continue carrying my SD302 as the primary field mixer in my day to day kit. The bright LED meters are a key reason, as well as the physical switches and other controls that are far easier to set up in a hurry than digging through the MixPre-6's touchscreen and menus. Even the fader knobs fit my hands better. It is simply a quicker and more foolproof device for operating in the field, and I love that I can read the levels from across the room or in the brightest sunlight.

    The lack of a true +4 dBm line level output on the MixPre-6 is another deficiency. It doesn't interface seamlessly with my cameras' inputs, and uses a relatively fragile 3.5 mm connector on the mixer end of the cable. And since it's a digital device, there is a slight but noticeable delay from input to output - I estimate it at about 5-10 ms, which amounts to about half a frame at 60 fps. Probably not enough to be a critical issue most of the time, but not something I would choose given that I still have the analog mixers to fall back on. Finally, the MixPre-6's battery life is relatively poor except when using the Sony battery sled, which adds quite a bit of bulk to the unit. My 302 has never failed to get me through a day's work on a set of three AA batteries. (Some of the other mixer/recorders you mentioned might not have these particular issues, which are specific to the MixPre-6.)

    Now I love the quality and features of all three of these units, and they each have a place in my workflow. Not a knock on Sound Devices at all. But if I were looking for a rugged, high quality and easy to use device to supplement the front end of a camera's audio system, my choice would be the original MixPre (-D) or 302 - not one of the new generation boxes with all digital controls and a LCD panel.

    I bought my 302 used, but in pristine condition, for about $600 several years ago through an ad here on DVXuser. That's still quite a bit less than the MixPre-6 is selling for.

    - Greg


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