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    #11
    Senior Member
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    Nov 2006
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    Ha, I remember seeing that same thing when I was researching and thinking "wtf.'

    It could be a couple things:

    1) That's what happens when you punch in really hard on a shot? They shot 5k and then punched in to 1080 for that shot so maybe imperceptible "microjitters" at full resolution become more apparent when there's more zoom. I don't know if this actually makes any physical sense. I can try to test it when I get a free moment.

    2) Their speedrail is nicked/not smooth in that portion.

    3) Something happened with their FIZ motor and it's vibrating the lens a bit. (To me the focus looks off, in addition to the shake, so it could very well be this.)

    4) After changing direction with one of the bigger cameras you have to be somewhat wary of shake if it's a quick move as the bars can flex a bit. A center support for a long run helps with this (and I don't think they had one.)

    5) Earthquake. It is LA after all


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    #12
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2012
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    Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcoughla View Post
    Ha, I remember seeing that same thing when I was researching and thinking "wtf.'

    It could be a couple things:

    1) That's what happens when you punch in really hard on a shot? They shot 5k and then punched in to 1080 for that shot so maybe imperceptible "microjitters" at full resolution become more apparent when there's more zoom. I don't know if this actually makes any physical sense. I can try to test it when I get a free moment.

    2) Their speedrail is nicked/not smooth in that portion.

    3) Something happened with their FIZ motor and it's vibrating the lens a bit. (To me the focus looks off, in addition to the shake, so it could very well be this.)

    4) After changing direction with one of the bigger cameras you have to be somewhat wary of shake if it's a quick move as the bars can flex a bit. A center support for a long run helps with this (and I don't think they had one.)

    5) Earthquake. It is LA after all
    Good points.


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    #13
    Senior Member cpreston's Avatar
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    May 2012
    Location
    Boston, MA
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    1,176
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    I see camera shake all throughout that video, especially when they have the turnaround for the slider motion. My guess is that the motorized head is not quite stiff enough to support the weight of the head. Alternatively, the weight is not perfectly balanced in the center of the head and the dana dolly. I've found that motorized slider movements can lead to harmonic vibrations in the camera head and it helps to keep the camera perfectly balanced and as low to the slider as possible. It is one of the reasons that I prefer Kessler's Parallax contraption over a motorized head.

    I'm surprised they would use that example as a marketing video.


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