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    #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharlesPapert View Post
    Indeed. You would think perhaps that their actual prime-time programming would get a more future-thinking approach (or even present, since many households have 4K TV's), especially given the obvious syndication value they've had from re-transferring film-acquired 4:3 shows to 16:9 HD, vs anything that was shot on tape being stuck in 4:3 SD.
    Someone else’s line item on the budget.
    Mitch Gross
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    #42
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    #43
    Senior Member El Director's Avatar
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    I don't get the uproar. If Netflix is paying you to make something for them, why shouldn't they be allowed to approve or reject a camera for whatever reason they want?


    Independent Filmmaker
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    #44
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Director View Post
    I don't get the uproar. If Netflix is paying you to make something for them, why shouldn't they be allowed to approve or reject a camera for whatever reason they want?
    Agreed. Most people in an uproar about the Netflix requirements overlook that they only apply to commissioned programming. How many people who get bent out of shape about their specs are actually being commissioned or ever stand a chance of being commissioned?
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
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    #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gweilo66 View Post
    The combination would need approval.
    Mitch Gross
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    #46
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    As stated before in another thread, I believe Netflix is simply legally complying to their 4K subscribers and future proofing the content they pay to produce...and in as much as they are putting up the money to make the project, fully their call. For someone with a great project needing to be produced and distributed, it does not get any better in my mind, than a streaming service like Netflix, and the camera used on said project would be such a small line item, relative to the production cost as to be inconsequential to the individual whose project Netflix would choose to fund...although Netflix follows an extremely investor oriented hard line, regarding producing shows and dropping them if the viewer ship does not exist, the access to someone with a strong project is so much better than the old brick and mortar studio systems, as to be a dream for any content creator who actually has a great project to make....that for me is Netflix's greatest gift to the industry and the public for that matter.


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    #47
    Senior Member scorsesefan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Director View Post
    I don't get the uproar. If Netflix is paying you to make something for them, why shouldn't they be allowed to approve or reject a camera for whatever reason they want?
    Because having a "one size fits all" mentality to equipment requirements is counterproductive in some cases: https://www.indiewire.com/2017/04/ne...ry-1201799403/


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    #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by scorsesefan View Post
    Because having a "one size fits all" mentality to equipment requirements is counterproductive in some cases: https://www.indiewire.com/2017/04/ne...ry-1201799403/
    And when you read the article you find that Netflix was willing to listen to their concerns and accommodate them. Yes it meant more data to wrangle. So what? Put it in the budget.

    The vast majority of complaints against the Netflix policy are people wanting to use the camera they already own or are used to shooting with. That’s not necessarily taking the best interests of the production into account. The fact is that there are now a bunch of great cameras of many types that can be used, so there are choices available for different types of productions. If you have a special situation you can make your case with Netflix and they’ll listen.
    Mitch Gross
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    Panasonic System Solutions Company


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    #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by scorsesefan View Post
    Because having a "one size fits all" mentality to equipment requirements is counterproductive in some cases: https://www.indiewire.com/2017/04/ne...ry-1201799403/
    The issue is they charge more for the 4K/HDR programming, and it's part of the sale that most/all their originals are shot in at least that resolution and color depth. They've been very flexible when you look at it in those terms. You're still free to create a show or film with whatever you like and try to sell it to them, but when they're paying the millions of dollars to produce a show, I think it's totally reasonable for anyone to have minimum reqs.

    The BBC famously requires things like 10-bit/422 that would exclude a lot of cameras like the once ubiquitous 5D. In fact, the uproar over the middle codec being missing from the C200 is partially (largely?) because braodcasters have requirements that the mp4 codec doesn't meet.


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