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    Netflix Approved List: Is the lack of TC in the only reason it was snubbed?
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    I was commenting on another corner of the net about the Netflix approved list, and brought up that the EVA-1 being accepted to the list was a big deal. Got me thinking and speculating about why the C200, which has internal RAW recording, was omitted when the C300 mk II is on the list and is working with the same sensor. At first glance I was only thinking about image quality alone because in narrative, shooting RAW isn't that big a deal (a doc would be tough; but probably overkill anyway). But what if the reason is more practical in that the C200 doesn't have TC built in? I've worked around that by using a pair of tentaclesyncs, but is Netflix thinking real world mid-budget narrative needs TC built in?

    If it's not that, I honestly don't know what else it could be. Anyone else wanna speculate or have any insight?


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    Quote Originally Posted by Fahnon View Post
    I was commenting on another corner of the net about the Netflix approved list, and brought up that the EVA-1 being accepted to the list was a big deal. Got me thinking and speculating about why the C200, which has internal RAW recording, was omitted when the C300 mk II is on the list and is working with the same sensor. At first glance I was only thinking about image quality alone because in narrative, shooting RAW isn't that big a deal (a doc would be tough; but probably overkill anyway). But what if the reason is more practical in that the C200 doesn't have TC built in? I've worked around that by using a pair of tentaclesyncs, but is Netflix thinking real world mid-budget narrative needs TC built in?

    If it's not that, I honestly don't know what else it could be. Anyone else wanna speculate or have any insight?
    I am working on two documentary films targeted specifically at Netflix. Both shot predominantly on the C200 in RAW. I don't really care that the camera doesn't meet their commissioned programming specs, my chances of ever being commisioned by Netflix are relatively small. If I am ever lucky enough to be commissioned by them, I will gladly use whatever camera they have on the list that qualifies, I wouldn't care if the C200 didn't, plenty of other good cameras on their list. As far as why they won't put the C200 on, I have no idea.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    Netflix has a rigorous testing process; it's not just based on a spec list. Part of the qualification is that the approved mode for shooting on the camera must be a practical one. Perhaps - and this is purely speculation - Netflix did not consider shooting a production for the service in Canon RAW Light was a practical concept for their producers. That would be the only mode that would qualify, just as on the A1 the only mode that qualifies is All-I 400mb 10-bit 422. It's possible that the lack of proper timecode or some other factor contributed to the decision. Again, it is a rigorous testing process with actual test shoots and post work with the camera.
    Mitch Gross
    Cinema Product Manager
    Panasonic System Solutions Company


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    Quote Originally Posted by mico View Post
    Netflix can go f themselves.
    Everyone on here seems to have the same sentiment towards Netflix, but they don't seem to have a lack of quality content being produced for them, to their specs, in spades.


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    I think what roils some is that the Netflix decree ignores content and places technical specs above all else. The decree says that Netflix doesn't care how amazing the content or how compelling the story, the technical specs take precedence. The work may be the most amazing, revelatory, emotionally compelling, cinematic content ever produced but if it is one digital bit shy of the specification for image resolution, Netflix doesn't want any part of it. Thanks, but no thanks. The decree supersedes art with "dumb" Math. It places the blind mathematical equation above all else. It is akin to declaring that you won't read any book that is less than 1000 pages. Or declaring that you won't go to any art museum that has less than 50,000 items on exhibit. Declaring that you won't listen to any composition of less than 7 minutes in length. Or declaring that you aren't open to falling in love with any woman whose boobs are less than 44DD.
    Last edited by JPNola; 09-16-2018 at 07:09 AM.
    Big sources matter.


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    Quote Originally Posted by JPNola View Post
    The work may be the most amazing, revelatory, emotionally compelling, cinematic content ever produced...
    I've watched a few Netflix originals and I'm fairly certain there's no danger of this happening.


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    I totally agree...44DD is just a technical spec. It’s the content that counts ;)
    Sony FS5, A7RII, Fuji XT-3, MacBook Pro


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    Quote Originally Posted by JPNola View Post
    I think what roils some is that the Netflix decree ignores content and places technical specs above all else. The decree says that Netflix doesn't care how amazing the content or how compelling the story, the technical specs take precedence. The work may be the most amazing, revelatory, emotionally compelling, cinematic content ever produced but if it is one digital bit shy of the specification for image resolution, Netflix doesn't want any part of it. Thanks, but no thanks. The decree supersedes art with "dumb" Math. It places the blind mathematical equation above all else. It is akin to declaring that you won't read any book that is less than 1000 pages. Or declaring that you won't go to any art museum that has less than 50,000 items on exhibit. Declaring that you won't listen to any composition of less than 7 minutes in length. Or declaring that you aren't open to falling in love with any woman whose boobs are less than 44DD.
    Perfect

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Turner View Post
    I've watched a few Netflix originals and I'm fairly certain there's no danger of this happening.
    Perfect


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    Quote Originally Posted by JPNola View Post
    I think what roils some is that the Netflix decree ignores content and places technical specs above all else. The decree says that Netflix doesn't care how amazing the content or how compelling the story, the technical specs take precedence. The work may be the most amazing, revelatory, emotionally compelling, cinematic content ever produced but if it is one digital bit shy of the specification for image resolution, Netflix doesn't want any part of it. Thanks, but no thanks. The decree supersedes art with "dumb" Math. It places the blind mathematical equation above all else. It is akin to declaring that you won't read any book that is less than 1000 pages. Or declaring that you won't go to any art museum that has less than 50,000 items on exhibit. Declaring that you won't listen to any composition of less than 7 minutes in length. Or declaring that you aren't open to falling in love with any woman whose boobs are less than 44DD.
    That isn’t my understanding of Netflix’s reasoning or policy at all. Way I understand it, if you’re producing your own content and Netflix sees it and wants to distribute it they will buy it from you regardless of what it was shot on. But if they’re financing your production and it’s a Netflix Original from jump, they want you to use one of the cameras that gives them the most flexibility as a platform. They want to be able to offer your show or movie in true 4K and HDR because there are people like me who invested in a 4K/HDR/Atmos setup, pay a premium for content shot that way. If you look at it from Netflix’s perspective, that is to say people who make more money by offering higher resolution content, then it does make sense to make sure anything you have a hand in producing is shot in the way that makes you the most money.

    It’s less like a person that won’t fall in love with someone that doesn’t have particular physical attributes (shallow), and more like if a person were somehow literally constructing a perfect mate and made them perfect (practical, and the plot of Weird Science).


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