Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30
  1. Collapse Details
    #11
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, Ca.
    Posts
    9,861
    Default
    I show posts like this to newbies considering getting into this business and then I tell them to get a degree and a real career. While I love our business, from a business standpoint, video production sucks. You have lots of potential legal pitfalls and gotchas coming at you all of the time and you are not even well compensated in most cases. It's not even that your potential client is stupid, it's that we all get hammered with crap like this all of the time, clients are always trying to weasel out of doing the right thing because it costs them time, money and effort. Tell them to take a hike.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #12
    Senior Member Samuel H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    7,920
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by offbeatbryce View Post
    All things I mentioned to the head of the non profit organization and I was told "We don't have time to deal with that"
    Get out.

    Shooting in a mall may or may not get you thrown out. That's not a big thing (unless they later say you accepted the job and now have the obligation of delivering, which would be an extremely dick move but who knows).

    Uploading a video in which non-consenting minors appear, without blurring their faces, can get you into much more serious legal trouble. It will likely just end up in the video being taken down, but it can escalate to a lot more than that. And seriously, what kind of cliend asks you to do something like this without thinking about the legal aspects at all.


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #13
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,641
    Default
    This is one of the reasons why this business is getting so bad. It's so full of people, now, that have no idea about things like this and just think they can do whatever they want. Like a lot of people on here, I have a background in news so I have a good idea about what can and can't be done, when and for what use. But so many now just think it's all free game. Maybe it's because of YouTube, Instagram and FaceBook, because people post stuff from everywhere all the time and they just assume it's the same when in comes to commercial(non-news/non-editorial) use. One of my clients is the production arm of a major league sport sanctioning body and even when we shoot with "their people"(away from the venues), everyone appearing on-camera(at least in a speaking capacity or prominently featured, not just off ) signs a release. CYA.
    Last edited by Run&Gun; 08-15-2018 at 12:45 PM.


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #14
    Default
    Let's make it simple: you cannot shoot in a mall without permission from the mall. Period.

    If the organization refuses to get permission, then you're done, right there and then.

    If there's a big paycheck on this gig, then you will have to assume all the legal duties for getting permission, getting releases, etc. If you don't want to do that, then walk.

    If the organization insists that you're being difficult, tell them to go there themselves and shoot it on their cell phones. Because that's about the only way anything gets shot. The mall will absolutely, unquestionably throw you out the minute you produce anything that looks like a real video camera.

    Furthermore, filming people's kids without their parents permission is a lawsuit waiting to happen. DON'T DO THAT. Get a signed release form from the parent of every kid who appears in it.

    If you want to avoid most of this hassle, move to a public place. Screw the mall, go to a public park, and get permission from the city/county/state who manages the park. You'll be on much safer ground at that point.


    2 out of 2 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    248
    Default
    Thanks for all the replies everyone. I have emailed the owners of the mall and explained what the project will be. Hopefully I get an email back explaining what needs to be done to film there if they will let me.


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #16
    Senior Member Patryk_Rebisz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    NYC, Noflag
    Posts
    2,157
    Default
    Dude, you don't listen to sound advice above.
    You have TWO problems at hand: 1.) filming at a mall (to which the mall might give you permission) and 2.) filming minors (to which the parents might give you permission but you gotta ask them FIRST and sign appropriate release).
    Patryk Rebisz
    director/DP
    www.ShoulderTheLion.com - my feature-length documentary
    www.TupeloProductions.com - my production company
    www.PatrykRebisz.com - my directing/DP work
    gear, gear, gear for rent in NYC area!!! >>> www.PatrykRebisz.com/lights.html
    (917) 291-2565


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Central NY
    Posts
    2,233
    Default
    Chances are good that he can get someone to wrangle the release forms, a big sign in the area that says something to the idea of: "if you do not wish your child to be recorded, please mention so before entering this area". Might help and might make it easier to get the forms signed. That sign wouldn't cover you in court, so you still need the release forms signed buy legal guardians. The only people that would have a right to be mad, would be the people interacting before the camera was set up, anyone after the camera is up and rolling have lost one leg to stand on. But that doesn't cover you, releases are still needed!

    I'd get the mall to sign a release as well, and I'd have a copy in my pocket for anyone that wanted to challenge your permission to shoot.

    I've never been kicked out of our malls, but I've hovered around waiting for permission to come back through the newsroom, and I've set up on private/public property that overlooks the malls as well. One of them has a gas station right at the entrance, and a long feud with the mall for trying to take their property at less than market value, it was easy to get permission to park in their lot and set up any kind of live shot we needed!

    But before all that, I probably would have found a polite way to turn this project away.


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #18
    Senior Member BrianMurphy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Montreal, Toronto, Ottawa
    Posts
    1,730
    Default
    Walk away. Anyone/client who chooses to skirt the obvious minimum requirements is trouble and it won't be the client who deals with the grief it will be you.
    Brian Murphy
    Montreal-Ottawa-Toronto
    Sony PXW-Z150 -Sony A7iii
    Sony-28/135 Cine-Tokina 11/16-Sigma 70/200 Sigma 24/70, Nikon 55(1.2)
    Collection of CY lenses and vintage Nikons, Canons.
    2x DJI Osmo Plus -GoPro H5
    Teradek Vidiu kit-BM WebPresenter/Open Broadcaster & WireCast.


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    West of the Pecos
    Posts
    2,240
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Patryk_Rebisz View Post
    Dude, you don't listen to sound advice above.
    You have TWO problems at hand: 1.) filming at a mall (to which the mall might give you permission) and 2.) filming minors (to which the parents might give you permission but you gotta ask them FIRST and sign appropriate release).
    .... and three, it sounds like a client that doesn't care; just get it done by any means possible. If they don't care about important matters such as these, they probably don't care about you either. Who knows what other issues lay ahead with them. Walk away from this one. Really, don't do it.


    Quote Originally Posted by offbeatbryce View Post
    All things I mentioned to the head of the non profit organization and I was told "We don't have time to deal with that"
    I read that to also mean they don't have time for fire codes, electrical safety, tripping hazards, child safety, liability, paying their vendors, parents lawsuits, mall lawsuits..... Run away.


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #20
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,641
    Default
    Why does it seem like so many "non-profits" behave like this? I believe that they(some) think that because they are a "non-profit" organization and (supposedly) helping others that normal rules and laws don't apply to them. And they want everything for free. "Why won't you do this for free?! We're helping the kids!" But their executives usually have ridiculous salaries...


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •