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    Erasing a 'Rumble' sound during an interview.
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    Hello!

    I'm no stranger here in asking for help. I've had an very unfortunate issue with onboard camera audio recently. My electronic FF developed a 'jitter' during an important interview I captured off-the-cuff and is audible.

    I've uploaded it here: https://youtu.be/zjjeT18cDUs

    You will hear the FF as a 'rumble' sound throughout the whole audio track.

    I'm in a terrible predicament here and I'm tearing my hair out. If there are any audio pros out there able to advise me I'd really, really appreciate it. Even if it cleans up 10% of the issues it's honestly worth it to me.

    Many thanks

    Alex


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    Senior Member Rick R's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, that is not a rumble issue (which is typically low frequencies below 100 Hz, usually from wind and/or physical vibration). Rumble is usually quick and easy to attenuate with an EQ or a high-pass filter. What you have, lives in the mid-range frequencies, right along with the frequencies you need, which is the dialog. Maybe someone with RX Advanced and lots of spare time can help you. Even with that, I don't think a there is a lot that can be done. Sorry.


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    Senior Member cpreston's Avatar
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    I figured I would take a listen to it and immediately think, "Yeah, we can fix that. Modern software can do wonders!" Then I actually listened to it. Nope. You might be able to get it to the point that the speaker was both intelligible and the average audience might not be so distracted by the sound that they could pay attention to what was being said, but it would take a huge amount of work. RX advanced is the software you need.


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    Quote Originally Posted by bosharpe View Post
    I've had an very unfortunate issue with onboard camera audio recently. My electronic FF developed a 'jitter' during an important interview I captured off-the-cuff and is audible.

    I've uploaded it here: https://youtu.be/zjjeT18cDUs

    You will hear the FF as a 'rumble' sound throughout the whole audio track.
    I don't know what that is, but it's not "rumble". A HPF can eliminate rumble. There's several noises going on in your audio and I wouldn't classify any as rumble. I couldn't hazard a guess what any one of them is.

    The problem with these noises is that 1) their frequency response extends up into the range used by the guy's voice, and 2) their amplitude becomes about as loud as the guys voice. IOW, taking out the noises will also take out parts of the guy's voice. It won't be pretty no matter what.

    My advice? Turn the sound down and use subtitles. Really. The best people using the best software and spending all your money aren't going to turn this into anything anyone is going to want to listen to, even for 60 seconds. So admit to your viewers that you know the sound is bad. Let them read what they need to, edit it tight so it's on screen for the least amount of time it can be, and move on. Problems happen. Experience is learning from it and getting better so it doesn't happen again.

    This is why you'll hear so many people advising monitoring audio through headphones *all the time*. Fixing the problem(s) when they happen is so much better than trying to patch things up in audio post, as you are about to find out. It's also one of the reasons people continuously advise to not mount mics on cameras -- you clip a lav on the guy and you'll at least get much better signal-to-noise ratio for the 20 or 30 seconds it takes to fish out the lav and clip it on him, which will also get rid of much of the "small room sound" reverb that is also hard to fix in post.


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    It's heavy on artifacts and the voice lost a lot of information resulting in a "tinny" sound, but the follow focus thumping is not as prevalent, at least.

    https://instaud.io/private/d6431346f...dd9ce78240d4f7


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    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    The Mythbusters guys proved you can polish a turd. But it's still a turd. Re-shoot or subtitles, this is why we should all be hiring professional sound mixers for every project we can.
    Just properly placing a boomed cardioid variant in the proper location would have mitigated most of these issues.
    I know, it happens to all of us, most of us have been in the same position, "Why didn't I hire a sound mixer!?!?"
    Gear matters. But just a little. Story is everything.


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    Quote Originally Posted by puredrifting View Post
    The Mythbusters guys proved you can polish a turd. But it's still a turd. Re-shoot or subtitles, this is why we should all be hiring professional sound mixers for every project we can.
    Just properly placing a boomed cardioid variant in the proper location would have mitigated most of these issues.
    I know, it happens to all of us, most of us have been in the same position, "Why didn't I hire a sound mixer!?!?"
    While I prefer to work with an audio guy for almost everything involving sound, this unfortunate problem didn't even need an audio guy. It just needed the shooter to monitor audio while they were shooting. Unfortunate and hopefully it doesn't cost the OP money or a client, but hopefully it's a chance for a good and valuable lesson to be learned: Always Monitor Audio.


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    Senior Member Rick R's Avatar
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    For sure, monitoring the sound would have alerted the OP of the horrendous noise, but whats-done-is-done, and unfortunately in this case, it's really not epairable without RX Advanced or other expensive spectral editing software and a few hundred hours. Even then, it would be a 'polished' turd.


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    Two important lessons in one shoot; Don't use an onboard microphone; Always check audio before, during, and after the shot. Hey, everyone has to learn this lesson one way or the other.
    Last edited by Paul F; 08-13-2018 at 03:43 PM.


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    Even without your "rumble" issue then the audio still sounds like sh*t! On camera mics are not how to do it. This is why professionals should be hired.
    Am a Sound Recordist in New Zealand: http://ironfilm.co.nz/sound/
    Follow my vlog and adventures in sound: https://www.youtube.com/c/SoundSpeeding


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