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    #61
    Senior Member cpreston's Avatar
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    The movies don't have a script. They are structured around the stunts that Cruise wants to do and locations that appeal to McQuarrie. Work on the dialogue for a scene starts a day or two before the scene is to be filmed. Mostly, Cruise and McQuarrie are trying to find motivation for why a specific stunt would occur. They are given a budget and a number of days to shoot the film, but the only real constraint seems to be the release date for the film. For example, the end of Rogue Nation was created when the producers/studio told Cruise and McQuarrie that they had a location and five days to finish the film. Until then, they had no idea what they were going to do to end the film. The studio really has no idea what it is buying, other than the reputation and profitability of Cruise and Mission Impossible.

    Both Cruise and McQuarrie are listed as producers, although I suspect that Cruise must have a deal in place where he is insuring most of the financial risk.

    It isn't that I am saying that either the studio or Cruise/McQuarrie are wrong to produce these movies this way. The results speak for themselves. I just have a hard time believing that it actually works out. The whole thing seems to ride on the personality and force of will of Cruise and McQuarrie's ability to be creative under pressure.


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    #62
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    At this point, it doesn't really matter what they do anymore because people will go see the movie regardless.

    You probably won't find anyone else making films like this...at least not on that level with that kind of money involved.


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    #63
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    Got the movie today and was rewatching some scenes. Did anyone else notice or feel that sometimes, most specifically on the helicopter scenes -- and at that, most specifically there the first part with the rope sequence -- that the best camera angles for beauty and story were compromised in order to make sure we could observe that it was Tom Cruise doing the stunt?

    Some of the shots on the BTS were more pleasing - a wide shot running up the rope and grabbing on, for example, is a whole lot more interesting to me than the sort of docu-style look to the zoomed in camera where Tom jumps onto the rope. I also felt there were a number of times on the chopper footage where a more balanced composition in the aerial shots, or a wider shot with the under helicopter shots, etc. would have been more "epic". One example is where Tom falls onto the payload before, and is seen hanging on as the helicopter crests a hill. The camera is so zoomed in, clearly to make sure it's a close-up on Tom, rather than choosing a clearer and more exciting angle or set of edited shots.

    I think if needing to show the actor wasn't a concern, an ideal storyboard would have served up this sequence with different framing. I felt a number of times that the camera work was more like watching a Red Bull action cam sequence meant to showcase the fact that "yup, this is actually Tom Cruise! It's a real helicopter!" rather than doing it for real and just showing us the best possible angles for the story and sequence holistically. I also felt where multiple edits or cuts would have served the story or piece a bit better, a long shot was used to prove it wasn't faked in editing.

    I get it, so much is faked today in CG and editing, but there's an irony when you have to create worse shots or forego edit points to prove that it wasn't CG, or that it wasn't a stunt double, or wasn't done in multiple tries. I'd rather watch the BTS and be impressed that it was done for real, by Tom, in one take, but then let the actually cinematography and editing make the best possible choices for the film. I think the authentic, visceral nature would still shine through in this case without it having to "prove itself".

    Just me, or anyone else see this too?


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    #64
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    I haven't seen the movie yet, but I think you'll like Tom a bit more now for this! haha

    https://www.engadget.com/2018/12/04/...4k/?yptr=yahoo


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    #65
    Moderator David Jimerson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    I haven't seen the movie yet, but I think you'll like Tom a bit more now for this! haha

    https://www.engadget.com/2018/12/04/...4k/?yptr=yahoo
    And yet Doug Trumbull is still on his quest to convince everyone that they REALLY prefer HFR.
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    #66
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    Ha! I do appreciate this campaign - long overdue!!


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    #67
    Senior Member El Director's Avatar
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    I really enjoyed the flick. Yeah, the CGI storm during the halo jump was a bit much, but given that they would've had to do a lot of digital work anyway to make the Arab landscape look like France, I rolled with. CG scenery aside, the jump overall was pretty realistic, including the amount of time the jump lasted. Once the robot voice started announcing the altitude, I started counting and sure enough it was 1000 feet ever five seconds. I love when movies have attention to small details like that. The only part of the jump I didn't care for is that Ethan still deployed his main parachute when he was under 1000 feet. Usually you'd go to the reserve at that point because they open faster.

    As for the movie overall, it's definitely right up there as a favorite for me in the series (3, 5 and now 6 are pretty much a tie, though I give 6 a slight lead because HALO jump). I also appreciated the passing of the torch so to speak from Julia to Ilsa regarding Ethan.

    One thing I would add though - now that we've seen the IMF save the world a few times, it'd be good to see them take on a smaller, more realistic mission again like in the first one.
    Last edited by El Director; 12-05-2018 at 01:07 PM.

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    #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Jimerson View Post
    And yet Doug Trumbull is still on his quest to convince everyone that they REALLY prefer HFR.
    To be fair, Doug advocates shooting in whatever frame rate you like but utilizing variable rate projection to elicit different emotional responses. If the projector runs 120p at all imes, then material shot at 24p with each frame repeated 5 times (no interpolation) will look the same as 24p for 24p projection. But then at specific moments, say an action scene or even an emotional argument, the camera capture frame rate can be changed to 30p, 60p or even 120p which the projection remains consistent. This is like changing aspect ratio or doing an iris/shutter pull to vary depth of field dynamically. It is another tool in the kit, and I can imagine times where it could be quite effective.

    Now interpolated frames for motion smoothing? Yeah, that's the work of the devil.
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    #69
    Senior Member roxics's Avatar
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    Hard to imagine what that would look like. I'd have to see it in action. Part of me thinks it would pull me out of the story though. Suddenly the scene shifts from looking like what I expect a movie to look like into something more soap opera looking. Seems like it would be distracting. But I don't know.

    I'm one of the few that didn't mind the Hobbit movies at 48fps, but they were consistently that throughout the film. In 3D it felt like a really epic stage play to me. I wouldn't want to watch every movie like that, but every once in a while it's interesting.


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    #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by roxics View Post
    Hard to imagine what that would look like. I'd have to see it in action. Part of me thinks it would pull me out of the story though. Suddenly the scene shifts from looking like what I expect a movie to look like into something more soap opera looking. Seems like it would be distracting. But I don't know.

    I'm one of the few that didn't mind the Hobbit movies at 48fps, but they were consistently that throughout the film. In 3D it felt like a really epic stage play to me. I wouldn't want to watch every movie like that, but every once in a while it's interesting.
    All I know is Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk looked like absolute trash to me at 120fps. If I recall correctly there was only one shot in the entire movie where I wasn't bothered by the frame-rate. Everything else looked fake (locations, sets, props, people). What may have been dramatic serious moments at 24fps were turned to comedic farce at 120fps.


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