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    #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jagraphics View Post
    VERY small number of Photographers covering Wimbledon.
    Im very proud that Ben started his career as my apprentice aged 18. Now I get my stills info (like how to use AF) from him, and mirror is still apparently where it is at
    BEN: https://www.gettyimages.co.uk/photos...t=best#license


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    #22
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    I've been wanting an EVF on my stills cams equal to that on my video cams for YEARS.


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    #23
    Senior Member Bern Caughey's Avatar
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    Two features a stills camera designed for commercial photography should have are a fat buffer, & the ability to offload RAWs relatively quickly to a tethered computer. I hate tethering but it’s become standard procedure in the commercial world, & is expected from Clients, & Agencies.


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    #24
    Senior Member jamedia.uk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by morgan_moore View Post
    ....and mirror is still apparently where it is at
    Not for the future according to Nikon
    http://www.dvxuser.com/V6/showthread...post1986761828

    and that is ignoring the inroads being made by Fuji in many areas.

    Similar arguments are made against all new technologies in photography.

    I recall seeing a letter "from the past" to the RGS bemoaning the lowering of standards in photography by using rolls of film rather than proper glass plates. the Photographer could not make his own roll film and ensure quality as he could with glass plates. Also the latter suggested with a roll of 12 frames the photographer would be a lot less careful with his composition as he could always take another one.... This was for the less that optimum medium format cameras. (toy cameras using 35mm film were not around then :-) )

    So whilst mirror is where it was at yesterday today if you take a vote I have no idea what the result would be. In a year or two I think we can safely say that mirrorless will be "it".
    DSLR's won't disappear overnight... I mean there are still some pro's using wet film 35mm cameras and even some with glass plate field cameras.

    However time and innovation marches on.

    BTW I type this on a proper manual typewriter and my secretary transcribes it to this interweb thing you are on. :-)


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    #25
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    The thing about mirrors is “simple” that they are within a stop or two of the brightness of the actual subject- an Evf is of fixed NITs of brightness.
    Yes a mirror can be superseded but only by a really bright Evf
    Just like film can be superseded or any analogue tech.

    I just don’t think it is happening yet.

    I’m not enough of a pedant to say it can happen


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    #26
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    We work with EVFs everyday for motion cameras. But when I pick up a still camera, there is nothing like a big, bright, clear viewfinder. The one thing I really love about my (now older) mirrorless (!) Leica M9 is the big, bright finder. My 1DX has a big, beautiful optical finder too. My A7RII...it's like watching a TV. Personal preference, I think...although once again, in extremes I wonder how that svelt mirrorless will do. Cold plays havoc on EVFs. Heat is bad for sensors, too...but the 1DX has such a big heat-sink in that body that you can shoot in the desert all day long and still bring home the goods. Anyone know a photographer in the Middle East using a mirrorless for their daily work? Sony is pushing the ultra-fast A9 as a competitor to the 1DX and Nikon's D5...but all their advertisements show them mid-court at Wimbledon...not in the Arctic, in the jungle, in the desert, etc. Also, those big dSLR batteries last a LONG time, even in cold temperatures.

    So, again, my opinion is that mirrorless can make as good, if not better technical image as a mirror-prism dSLR, but is anyone trusting it out in the real world, away from air conditioning and Starbucks?
    Sony FS5, A7RII, Fuji XT-3, MacBook Pro


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    #27
    Senior Member jamedia.uk's Avatar
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    just got this https://www.parkcameras.com/nikon-fu...a-announcement


    However this thread was not about mirrorless or DSLR it was about what the OP should use for getting back in to still photography. It does depend what sort of photography the OP wants to do. Photographing Tennis is my idea of hell, so is cat walk fashion.


    The OP mentioned 4K video.... you need the evf for the video anyway. Though I don't like DSLR's for video. I use video cameras for that as the ergonomics (and the audio ) are very different.


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    #28
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by morgan_moore View Post
    The thing about mirrors is “simple” that they are within a stop or two of the brightness of the actual subject- an Evf is of fixed NITs of brightness.
    Yes a mirror can be superseded but only by a really bright Evf
    Just like film can be superseded or any analogue tech.

    I just don’t think it is happening yet.

    I’m not enough of a pedant to say it can happen
    But an EVF(a good one) is going to show you the actual image as the sensor sees it, which is more important.


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    #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Run&Gun View Post
    But an EVF(a good one) is going to show you the actual image as the sensor sees it, which is more important.
    Not really - if your eye needs to be at 'T2' to see the EVF and 'T64' to see the outside world then it becomes straining very fast as your eye has to 'rack iris' all day.

    Yes - seeing what the sensor is seeing is important but that is mainly done by 'chimping' before or after the shot.


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    #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by David_Manning View Post
    We work with EVFs everyday for motion cameras. But when I pick up a still camera, there is nothing like a big, bright, clear viewfinder. The one thing I really love about my (now older) mirrorless (!) Leica M9 is the big, bright finder. My 1DX has a big, beautiful optical finder too. My A7RII...it's like watching a TV. Personal preference, I think...although once again, in extremes I wonder how that svelt mirrorless will do. Cold plays havoc on EVFs. Heat is bad for sensors, too...but the 1DX has such a big heat-sink in that body that you can shoot in the desert all day long and still bring home the goods. Anyone know a photographer in the Middle East using a mirrorless for their daily work? Sony is pushing the ultra-fast A9 as a competitor to the 1DX and Nikon's D5...but all their advertisements show them mid-court at Wimbledon...not in the Arctic, in the jungle, in the desert, etc. Also, those big dSLR batteries last a LONG time, even in cold temperatures.

    So, again, my opinion is that mirrorless can make as good, if not better technical image as a mirror-prism dSLR, but is anyone trusting it out in the real world, away from air conditioning and Starbucks?
    I dunno, I just today shot around 1200 photos in heat ranging (depending on
    who you believe) from 106-111 degrees at the west regionals of the little league world
    series. With a Sony mirrorless. As for cold, I use it every winter in Alaska. Not
    sure if that is extreme enough conditions for you, but I've never had a single hiccup....
    and even if they are not extreme enough, the conditions I use Sony mirrorless cams
    in are certainly not 'air conditioning and a Starbucks.'


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