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    Anybody shoot stock footage? Its becoming more difficult.
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    Senior Member Vultch's Avatar
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    Sometimes if I see an item of interest, or perhaps when out on a corporate shoot (in my own time) I may shoot 15 min of stock footage in a public area.

    The conditions for stock footage see mto be tightening, for example a city centre scene, if a bus drives by in the background with a company name that you can just about read, the clip is rejected. I recently did a shoot on a large specialized building site, great shots of big cranes but because the crane owners had their logos on the cranes everything is rejected.

    reading some of the conditions, if you shoot the exterior of a distinctive building in a public area (i.e members of the public can see this with their Mk I eyeballs), you now require clearance from the owners of the building.

    Is it just me, it seems hardly worth the effort now.
    Everything involving the pig is above board.


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    Ouch. I guess this makes sense but it does make it very hard. The recognizable building issue I know has been there for at least 5 years as I had clips rejected for that.

    I’ve repurposed shots for stock footage but never shot specifically for stock.

    One thing I would do if I had a shot that almost works would be to digitally edit it and take out a brand logo or something to that effect, if the shot was otherwise good.


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    You can still sell that footage with an editorial license on some agencies.


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    Senior Member mainstreetprod's Avatar
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    I shot thousands of clips in a 5 year period and uploaded them to stock sites. Some sold a few clips a year, one sold lots and made me a couple hundred a month. One by one the sites went out of business or were resold, putting me out of the stock business. I have backups of the clips but with the time it takes to log and upload each clip, it's not worth it. My solution to faces is shallow focus or shoot from the back, for logos, blur out or shoot around them.
    A feature film shot on the Sony FS7

    www.Summerof67.com


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    Senior Member min lee's Avatar
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    Same here. Not really worth the effort. I used to think that I put these clips up and it will continue to make me money over time. Reality is with so many new clips added each day, unless you can scale up your submissions, you will continue to get a smaller share of the profits over time. It doesn't help that some company shut down or change their policies which you have no control over.


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    I'm averaging about $2700 per month from stock footage sales and that is rising every month, so there is definitely money to be made. I'm mostly uploading to Shutterstock and Adobe.



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    I haven't updated my portfolio in a while, but I make $50-75 / month on average. Not much, but since 2013, the effort to income ratio has definitely been good.

    Pond5 is pretty good with editorial stuff, so you can sometimes sell things with logos, etc.

    85% of my income has been slow mo shots of my dog, shot with the ancient HMC150. They still sell to this day. It's a funny business, discovering what works and what doesn't. I plan on doing it alot more once I get my GH5.


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    At least you don't need a release for your dog!

    Yeah, the money earned vs. the time I put into it makes stock footage the most lucrative thing that I can do with my time. The way I figure it, I'm making over $270 per hour.
    BTW, Shutterstock also allows editorial clips and those have been some of my best moneymakers.


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    Senior Member Mark Williams's Avatar
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    I have a shot of a full moon surrounded with fast moving clouds in 720p that has sold over 35 times. Other superior 4k shots have never sold. I just play around with stock video to pay for new gear. Doug seems to be doing pretty good at it.
    Last edited by Mark Williams; 03-22-2019 at 08:57 AM.
    Regards,

    Mark

    GH5, Panasonic 12-60, 14-45, 45-175, Olympus 60 macro, 75-300, Benro S6 Tripod, Rhino Carbon 24" Slider, and Edius 8.5 WG.
    Video channel: https://vimeo.com/channels/3523
    Stock Video: https://www.pond5.com/artist/mark29#1/2063


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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Jensen View Post
    At least you don't need a release for your dog!

    Yeah, the money earned vs. the time I put into it makes stock footage the most lucrative thing that I can do with my time. The way I figure it, I'm making over $270 per hour.
    BTW, Shutterstock also allows editorial clips and those have been some of my best moneymakers.
    Exactly! And she never minds going outside for some running and playtime.

    Hats off to you, Doug. That's a solid amount of income, especially on a per hour basis.

    There's something about selling stock footage that feels so......pure, for lack of a better word. No schmoozing clients. No revisions, no creative disagreements. You simply upload clips, people know EXACTLY what they're getting and either buy it or not. I love that simplicity. I love that many of my best selling clips were simple shots I grabbed on the way home from a shoot, because I happened to have my camera with me.


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