Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. Collapse Details
    Acquisition guidelines for various networks?
    #1
    Cinematographiliac DC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, California USA
    Posts
    2,096
    Question
    I'm hoping someone can point me to the right places for finding this information...

    I know that networks can be picky about their allowable video acquisition and required percentages. I need to know the acceptable cameras, formats, frame rates, etc. for documentary/realityTV distribution on some networks:

    Animal Planet

    NatGeo

    The Travel Channel

    ...your basic cable television, more or less.


    If you could recommend one particular camera that would likely satisfy all the guidelines of most any network, which would it be? Proposed shoot is a modest budget and a pro (handheld) camcorder with a fixed lens would be ideal. I would def need to acquire footage in 4K (UHD). Also, I'm biased toward Panasonic cameras and that's where the bulk of my experience is.

    Thanks!

    PANASONIC AF100 - SIGMA SD1 still photography -
    AVID Symphony
    editing/grading
    - ADOBE suite
    For Hire - Los Angeles based, World Traveler
    I just saved a bunch of money on my car insurance by canceling it.



    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,842
    Default
    It it is doco/reality and you're creating then trying to sell then all sorts of cameras could be used. Heck even a Panasonic point and shoot:


    You can get a Panasonic FZ1000 for four hundred bucks or so secondhand:
    https://www.eoshd.com/comments/topic...tary-shooting/

    2x Panasonic FZ1000 for when you need to do multicamera interviews with a Panasonic GH5S (for grabbing evening/night shots, if your doco needs that as well) would be an excellent trio of cameras to get on the cheap.
    Am a Sound Recordist in New Zealand: http://ironfilm.co.nz/sound/
    Follow my vlog and adventures in sound: https://www.youtube.com/c/SoundSpeeding


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    479
    Default
    I don't know the exact answer, but the PBS Technical Operating Specifications would be a good place to start.

    I don't think the camera brand or model really matters, just as long as it can record 10-bit 4:2:2 1080P at 29.976 FPS (you'll probably deliver it as interlaced though).


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #4
    Senior Member David W. Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    La Petite Roche
    Posts
    6,722
    Default
    Shop the concept first, not a produced show.


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #5
    Senior Member scorsesefan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Queens, New York
    Posts
    1,602
    Default
    I've done some broadcast work for ABC-TV and WPIX here in NYC. I've shot 23.97 and 29.97 in 8 bit 4:2:0 without issue. The delivery is usually 720p 59.94i H264 -- broadcast standards aren't incredibly high BTW. If you're worried about delivery transcode to 4:2:2 Prores HQ or similar. Honestly, I don't think the engineers will be raking over your footage to discover you haven't used a robust codec or color space -- as long as it looks good.

    David is right, concern yourself with the concept (content). If they love what you've done they won't care if it was shot on a Fisher Price camera...


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    479
    Default
    You'll also want to make sure that the finished product has broadcast legal color and audio levels.


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Byron Bay, Australia
    Posts
    1,352
    Default
    If you're shooting 10-bit 422 you'll be covered for pretty much all broadcasters requirements.

    However if you're delivering a completed program they'll be far more concerned with the overall quality of the finished product than with the original recording format.

    FS7 & C300mkII have been the kings in this domain for a few years now, and no doubt the EVA1 will start to become a major player too.
    VIDEO PRODUCER ON THE NSW NORTH COAST, AUSTRALIA
    Sony FS700 || Shogun Inferno
    Adobe CC 2018


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #8
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Los Angeles, Ca.
    Posts
    9,860
    Default
    Everyone is right here, but keep in mind, camera specs really only matter for commissioned work generally. "Broadcast specs" went out the window to a point, when news stations sarted airing home video footage decades ago. Sure, if Netflix or PBS hires you, you have to hew to their specs. But if you produce good, compelling content with decent sound and picture, doesn't really matter what it was shot on anymore. You have movies shot on phones getting theatrical runs and you can see all kinds of lower quality video all over television and OTTs, its the idea that matters, the execution, not so much the camera or format anymore. That said, You are pretty safe with the Canon C300 MKII or Sony FS7 for almost any level of production these days as far as shooting on what is most popular.

    So unless a network or studio is writing you a check to go shoot your project, allocate your budget intelligently. If someone is writing you a check, you generally have to shoot what they tell you to and contractually obligate you to. If you are shooting your own project and financing it without the help of your client, shoot whatever you can afford and concentrate more on concept and story than worrying about specs.

    Story trumps all
    Sound matters more than picture
    Lighting matters to a point but cameras can shoot usable images in such low light now that many people fear that good lighting is somewhat retreating because you can get a recognizable, "acceptable" image with little to no lighting in many situations
    At the end, if someone is going to buy your project, your master will have to go through QC, whcih will broadcast legalize it. It's much better if you bring your master file or tape (yes, a few outlets still request tape masters) to a QC vendor with levels, both audio and video that are already legal.
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


    Reply With Quote
     

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •