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    Senior Member Eric Coughlin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Run&Gun View Post
    Ok. Josh opened the door for something I was thinking yesterday after reading something in one of Eric's posts. It's as much the mentality behind it as what he actually said. And I'm not picking on Eric, because this is very prevalent in this industry and profession. Why does it seem like we are the only industry that will make the job harder on ourselves in the effort to try and save the client money? In almost anything else, if the client/customer/whatever you want to refer to them as, doesn't have enough money or they do not want to spend the money, the client/customer is the one who ends up lacking something, not the business. If I go into a nice restaurant and sit down and want to get an appetizer, steak, side and dessert and it's gonna cost $67, but I only have or want to spend $51, I'm gonna have to drop something from the order or order something less expensive. The waiter doesn't come up and say, hey you know there are a lot of people involved in making that order, but I'll tell you what, so you can eat all of that and still only pay the $51, I will go back there and make it all myself and serve you. That way the chef and other cooks don't have to be paid for preparing your meal and it will cost less.

    Okay, it's not a perfect analogy, but most of you probably get my point.

    I've passed on jobs before that should have been two-man and the client didn't want to pay for it(hell, they're not the ones doing anything but walking into the room and sitting down and asking questions. Why do they care how hard it was loading everything in, setting it up and then shooting and running audio, all as one person?) I'm also not sleeping in my f@#$ing truck to save a few bucks on a hotel room, either. You can find a decent room for $75. And if that's gonna make or break your profit on the shoot, something is wrong.

    I just look at what so many people in our profession do now that hurts the overall industry and makes the jobs harder and gets us paid less money on top of it.
    I'm not suggesting doing clients a favor of reducing crew so they can save money; I'm suggesting make more money for yourself instead of hiring unnecessary crew.

    Let me give an example beyond a PA of how one-man-banding can be a lot more profitable. Say a client comes to me with a $3600 budget for an interview shoot. Now, say I don't know their budget, but I can quote them two ways. The first one which may be your preferred (or typical) way...me (DP), C300 Mark II, L-series lenses, lighting, tripod ($1900), sound operator w/gear ($850), gaffer/grip ($600), PA ($250), for a total of $3600. Perhaps I'm up-charging the crew rates for a total of $250, so I'm getting $2150 from the job in profit.

    Now, the second, much more profitable way for me to quote this job is as a one-man-band, which would be me, Arri Amira (or two C300 Mark IIs), Canon cinema zoom(s), lighting kit, audio, tripod, for a total of $3600, all for me. Now, if they happen to have a bigger budget, then after they've hired me with my best gear at my top rate for an interview, then they can ask about adding crew in.

    Whenever a client asks me for a quote, I rarely quote crew into the quote unless they specifically ask for crew, otherwise I just assume one-man-band, and try to get the best rate I can with my best equipment. I typically upcharge crew rates by around $100, so if I'm booking and paying out a three person crew for one day, I make around $300 off of that, and I find it takes me around an hour of time per person, so, I'm making $100 per hour for crewing. Now, contrast that with if the client decides to book my higher end equipment instead, which since it's a bit larger and heavier, may take another 5 minute trip, and may take a few more minutes to prep before the shoot...so, all told, I'm making $1500 extra off of the higher end equipment for about 15-20 minutes of work compared to $300 for three hours of putting a crew together.

    Now, with this strategy of choosing equipment over crew, I get to make more money, have justification for owning more expensive equipment, my client gets better equipment for the same price, and I believe I'm actually able to provide the client with a better product than what a crew would have done with lower quality equipment. As far as sound, I own top of the line mics. Heck, I hired an audio guy for an interview shoot a few months ago, paid him a decent $800 rate, and he puts up his Sennheser ME66 mic for the indoor interview. And here I'm thinking, I have a Schoeps CMC641 sitting in my car which is a far superior mic, as well as a Sanken CS-3e which is also much superior, as my mics are often superior mics to what the pro sound guys have.

    And then the lighting guy is typically not going to come up with a better lighting scheme than what I find myself capable of doing since I'm quite capable of lighting an interview, so at that point I'm really just directing them to do what I could have done on my own as far as setting up lights. And the PA really just helps with carrying gear in and out, which I also could have done. So, assuming there's no big hurry to setup this interview (which there typically isn't on my shoots (just sometimes)), not to mention I often setup on my own about as quickly as crewed shoots, then me taking a little extra time to setup is not going to result in a lower quality end product for the client. So again, I get to own better equipment, make more money, and provide the client with a better product at the same price.

    Obviously I'm not saying no shoots should be done with crew. For example, I'll insist on a sound guy when one is actually needed. I just feel many shoots have unnecessary crew and there are better ways to get profit from clients than by paying other people, particularly if the client doesn't have an unlimited budget.


    I recall a couple or few years ago this producer wanted to hire me to DP for a really low budget feature shoot - said he could maybe do $300 per day with gear (I had a C300 Mark II at the time and other good gear). So we were discussing rates and trying to figure out how to make it work, since he had limited funds and any extra money he gave me would mean some other part of the budget would need to be cut. Eventually we concluded I didn't need an AC, so I was able to negotiate to $500 per day for myself. And it worked out fine. At the time I hadn't really worked with an AC before, so I was like, "What is the point? I can pull my own focus. I do it all the time." Since then I've had AC's pulling focus wirelessly on crewed shoots and it does make things easier, and of course for Steadicam work makes various shots possible. But I still feel like when an AC is not pulling focus (such as the shoot not having a wireless follow focus setup, or some reality TV shoot where there's no follow focus, etc.), then the AC does what? Helps change lenses? I can do that with L-series lenses so easily, in like 5-10 seconds. At this point I feel like they're glorified PAs, but getting paid AC rates. I typically have specific ways I rig my camera, so don't want to trust an AC to get it right.

    A few months ago a potential client said they had $1500 in the budget for me and an audio guy. I said my rates started at $1500 at the time, so I could do audio and take the full budget. They considered it, but ended up not hiring me. But sometimes these cases do work out, and it's cases like these, where the clients have limited budget, but still enough budget for you to make good profit, if the crew is cut down. Again, only crew that isn't actually needed. Most shoots I can handle my own audio, and when I can't, I make sure we have an audio guy.


    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Bass View Post
    I guess another thing it comes down is, you may make "a lot of money" doing things the way you do, but are you HAPPY doing it this way? It's a quality of life thing. Yes, this is a job, it's work, but folks seem to forget sometimes that we allegedly got into this because we LIKE it. Do you LIKE how things are right now for you? Does the money saved compensate for the discomfort you experience?
    Yeah, I'm quite happy with how things are now. I really like driving and traveling, and sleeping in a car is kind of like camping, and I enjoy that aspect as well. The last two or three years I only drove 20,000 miles per year, compared to the 30,000 the previous year, and I didn't feel like I was driving as much as I would have liked, so I was hoping to get back to driving more, and now this year I'm on track to drive about 50,000-60,000 miles. I may have actually reached a point where it's a bit more than I'd like, maybe 40,000 would be ideal, but it's been good overall. I moved to Atlanta a few months ago, haven't established much in terms of local clients, so most of my jobs are out of town, within a 0-7 hour drive in all different directions (Memphis, Raleigh, Atlanta, Charlotte, Greesnsboro, Nashville, Birmingham, Cincinatti, New Orleans, Tampa, Jacksonville, Orlando, etc.). Atlanta being centrally located compared to where I used to live in Tampa has been great for me. I would like to get more local clients, but haven't gotten around to working on locally marketing myself more yet.

    Call me weird, but I like sleeping in my car, find it comfortable, convenient, free, and time saving. I sleep better in my car than in hotels, and get nice 7-8 hour sleeps. I'm able to lay down all the way in my car, legs fully stretched, on a few layers of comforters, so about as comfortable as a bed. Photo....



    My jobs pay enough that I could afford a hotel, I just feel that hotels to me are a waste of both time and money. Consider time - you spend 30 minutes finding and booking the hotel, then get there at 10pm...30 minutes checking in and unloading any equipment you don't want to leave in the car, then spend a good amount of time getting settled into the room, get your laptop out, browse DVXuser, reply to topics, turn the TV on, catch some movie on HBO that you get hooked on, two hours later the movie is done, get ready for sleep, and now it's 2am, four hours after you got to the hotel. Call time is 8am tomorrow, and you want to wake up at 7am to catch continental breakfast, plus you have to spend 15 or so minutes bringing gear back to the car. So, all told you get 5 hours of sleep and wasted five hours awake at the hotel.

    Now on the other hand, sleeping in the car, you pull over at a rest stop or travel station where there are always lots of people also sleeping in their cars, you're probably not going to waste time watching a movie or browsing DVXuser, so what do you do? You go right to sleep, at, say 11pm (you left home a bit later since you knew you wouldn't be wasting so much time at a hotel). Wake up at 7:30am, grab some fast food (5 minutes), eat on way to shoot, and then you arrive with a good sleep and not having wasted so much time at a hotel.

    Now, the mentality of travel. Client asks me to do a job for say $2,300, it's six hours away, and I'm working as a local. 12 hour round trip. My mentality is, no wasting time at a hotel, no loosing money by going to a hotel, 12 hours of driving is fun, so not exactly work, the gas and vehicle wear and tear is around $150, so I'm making $2150 in profit. If the shoot ends at 5pm, I can be back home at 11pm, and ready to go for another shoot the next day, so even though there are 12 hours of driving plus an 8-10 hour shoot, I'm still only giving up one day of my time, and making $2150. Good money. I'm happy. Now, since I have the ability to travel cheaply and efficiently I can market myself in several major cities, and perhaps succeed at what a lot of freelancers struggle with, which is staying regularly busy with full rate jobs. Which is what I've been doing with this, regularly getting booked at around $2k and upward per day, driving a ton, and making $100k in the first 5.5 months of this year, and $26.5k in May, just from shooting (no editing). Not bad money for a single 31 year old.

    Now say someone has a different mentality toward travel. They get offered a $2300 job, but with 12 hours of travel, they think of it as a two day job, so $1150 per day. Then they spend $100 for hotel, and decide to get two hotel nights, so $200. They calculate their gas and wear and tear at the government rate instead of their actual losses, so imagine they loose $300 on that. Then instead of either packing food or eating cheap fast food, they go to nice/decent restaurants and spend $100 on food that would have been cheaper had they stayed home. Now, this $2300 per day job suddenly becomes a $850 per day job, which, if they own a lot of gear and are used to making $1k-2k per day, suddenly don't feel like they're making enough money. So what do they do? They pass on the job, sit at home, and make nothing. Because travel is too much for them and they're not able to enjoy it, do it efficiently, and cheaply. Nothing wrong with that; to each their own. I'm just saying it's been working well for me.



    Now a bit back to the original topic, as you can see from the photo above, there's not a lot of room for a full-size cart in there. The Remin Kartmaster HD-500 does look decently small, though 44 lbs seems a bit heavy. That could possibly work.

    I think my current cart could work too, and I just need to slim down my lighting kit. It's in a big, long Manfrotto bag now, so I'd like to get some smaller lights and put it in a bag half the size. Then with proper arrangement I could fit everything on one cartload, either with my current cart or a new cart.
    Last edited by Eric Coughlin; 06-10-2018 at 02:13 AM.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Run&Gun View Post
    Ok. Josh opened the door for something I was thinking yesterday after reading something in one of Eric's posts. It's as much the mentality behind it as what he actually said. And I'm not picking on Eric, because this is very prevalent in this industry and profession. Why does it seem like we are the only industry that will make the job harder on ourselves in the effort to try and save the client money? In almost anything else, if the client/customer/whatever you want to refer to them as, doesn't have enough money or they do not want to spend the money, the client/customer is the one who ends up lacking something, not the business. If I go into a nice restaurant and sit down and want to get an appetizer, steak, side and dessert and it's gonna cost $67, but I only have or want to spend $51, I'm gonna have to drop something from the order or order something less expensive. The waiter doesn't come up and say, hey you know there are a lot of people involved in making that order, but I'll tell you what, so you can eat all of that and still only pay the $51, I will go back there and make it all myself and serve you. That way the chef and other cooks don't have to be paid for preparing your meal and it will cost less.

    Okay, it's not a perfect analogy, but most of you probably get my point.

    I've passed on jobs before that should have been two-man and the client didn't want to pay for it(hell, they're not the ones doing anything but walking into the room and sitting down and asking questions. Why do they care how hard it was loading everything in, setting it up and then shooting and running audio, all as one person?) I'm also not sleeping in my f@#$ing truck to save a few bucks on a hotel room, either. You can find a decent room for $75. And if that's gonna make or break your profit on the shoot, something is wrong.

    I just look at what so many people in our profession do now that hurts the overall industry and makes the jobs harder and gets us paid less money on top of it.
    I'm not Eric but I'm going to speak to this just a little. There are lots of
    jobs in the production industry. Some people work as a camera op,
    an AC, a grip, a gaffer, a DIT, an editor, producer, director (or many
    other positions) as part of a crew. Then there are some of us who
    for whatever reason, self produce entire videos for commercial
    clients. Do all the lighting, sound, shooting, color grading, graphics,
    and editing. Often when you are a 'one man band' filmmaker, you
    bid on a job for a potential client. Say you bid $4500 to produce a
    2 minute promo film. Now hopefully you budgeted for your expenses
    and still have a profit from that amount. Let's say your expenses are
    $1000. You will still 'make' $3500. But then you might decide that
    if you don't hire that PA and you carry in your gear yourself, you
    will 'make' $3750 instead. See where I'm going here? It's not
    that 'the client refuses to pay' for it. It really depends on the job.
    Some jobs I need the help as there is so much to be done that
    it would be almost impossible for me to do it myself. But there
    are plenty of jobs where, sure, I'll have to make an extra trip in
    and out if I don't hire someone else. But I know my gear will be
    handled correctly and not thrown around, and it's really not too
    difficult to get it done myself. Would it be easier with help? Sure,
    but it's not that much tougher for me to do it myself and it's worth
    the extra money I can keep instead of paying out of the budget.
    That way I might actually get to bring the fam on vacation this
    year you know?

    *Edit, I see Eric just extensively answered this while I was hitting
    send.
    Last edited by alaskacameradude; 06-10-2018 at 01:44 AM.


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    #33
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    Then to all that I say rock on, whatever works for you guys. I suppose it really depends on each situation. When I think of making multiple trips, I am thinking of, since it's often the case, working in a fancy schmancy building where you have to move the gear quite a ways from where you parked, get through one or more layers of security, and one or more elevators to get to your eventual destination. If you have to do THAT multiple times, AND do it twice (beginning of shoot and end of shoot), it's quite a hassle and can add quite a bit of time to the day.


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    #34
    Senior Member indiawilds's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Coughlin View Post
    I'm not suggesting doing clients a favor of reducing crew so they can save money; I'm suggesting make more money for yourself instead of hiring unnecessary crew.

    Let me give an example beyond a PA of how one-man-banding can be a lot more profitable. Say a client comes to me with a $3600 budget for an interview shoot. Now, say I don't know their budget, but I can quote them two ways. The first one which may be your preferred (or typical) way...me (DP), C300 Mark II, L-series lenses, lighting, tripod ($1900), sound operator w/gear ($850), gaffer/grip ($600), PA ($250), for a total of $3600. Perhaps I'm up-charging the crew rates for a total of $250, so I'm getting $2150 from the job in profit.

    Now, the second, much more profitable way for me to quote this job is as a one-man-band, which would be me, Arri Amira (or two C300 Mark IIs), Canon cinema zoom(s), lighting kit, audio, tripod, for a total of $3600, all for me. Now, if they happen to have a bigger budget, then after they've hired me with my best gear at my top rate for an interview, then they can ask about adding crew in.

    Whenever a client asks me for a quote, I rarely quote crew into the quote unless they specifically ask for crew, otherwise I just assume one-man-band, and try to get the best rate I can with my best equipment. I typically upcharge crew rates by around $100, so if I'm booking and paying out a three person crew for one day, I make around $300 off of that, and I find it takes me around an hour of time per person, so, I'm making $100 per hour for crewing. Now, contrast that with if the client decides to book my higher end equipment instead, which since it's a bit larger and heavier, may take another 5 minute trip, and may take a few more minutes to prep before the shoot...so, all told, I'm making $1500 extra off of the higher end equipment for about 15-20 minutes of work compared to $300 for three hours of putting a crew together.

    Now, with this strategy of choosing equipment over crew, I get to make more money, have justification for owning more expensive equipment, my client gets better equipment for the same price, and I believe I'm actually able to provide the client with a better product than what a crew would have done with lower quality equipment. As far as sound, I own top of the line mics. Heck, I hired an audio guy for an interview shoot a few months ago, paid him a decent $800 rate, and he puts up his Sennheser ME66 mic for the indoor interview. And here I'm thinking, I have a Schoeps CMC641 sitting in my car which is a far superior mic, as well as a Sanken CS-3e which is also much superior, as my mics are often superior mics to what the pro sound guys have.

    And then the lighting guy is typically not going to come up with a better lighting scheme than what I find myself capable of doing since I'm quite capable of lighting an interview, so at that point I'm really just directing them to do what I could have done on my own as far as setting up lights. And the PA really just helps with carrying gear in and out, which I also could have done. So, assuming there's no big hurry to setup this interview (which there typically isn't on my shoots (just sometimes)), not to mention I often setup on my own about as quickly as crewed shoots, then me taking a little extra time to setup is not going to result in a lower quality end product for the client. So again, I get to own better equipment, make more money, and provide the client with a better product at the same price.

    Obviously I'm not saying no shoots should be done with crew. For example, I'll insist on a sound guy when one is actually needed. I just feel many shoots have unnecessary crew and there are better ways to get profit from clients than by paying other people, particularly if the client doesn't have an unlimited budget.


    I recall a couple or few years ago this producer wanted to hire me to DP for a really low budget feature shoot - said he could maybe do $300 per day with gear (I had a C300 Mark II at the time and other good gear). So we were discussing rates and trying to figure out how to make it work, since he had limited funds and any extra money he gave me would mean some other part of the budget would need to be cut. Eventually we concluded I didn't need an AC, so I was able to negotiate to $500 per day for myself. And it worked out fine. At the time I hadn't really worked with an AC before, so I was like, "What is the point? I can pull my own focus. I do it all the time." Since then I've had AC's pulling focus wirelessly on crewed shoots and it does make things easier, and of course for Steadicam work makes various shots possible. But I still feel like when an AC is not pulling focus (such as the shoot not having a wireless follow focus setup, or some reality TV shoot where there's no follow focus, etc.), then the AC does what? Helps change lenses? I can do that with L-series lenses so easily, in like 5-10 seconds. At this point I feel like they're glorified PAs, but getting paid AC rates. I typically have specific ways I rig my camera, so don't want to trust an AC to get it right.

    A few months ago a potential client said they had $1500 in the budget for me and an audio guy. I said my rates started at $1500 at the time, so I could do audio and take the full budget. They considered it, but ended up not hiring me. But sometimes these cases do work out, and it's cases like these, where the clients have limited budget, but still enough budget for you to make good profit, if the crew is cut down. Again, only crew that isn't actually needed. Most shoots I can handle my own audio, and when I can't, I make sure we have an audio guy.



    Yeah, I'm quite happy with how things are now. I really like driving and traveling, and sleeping in a car is kind of like camping, and I enjoy that aspect as well. The last two or three years I only drove 20,000 miles per year, compared to the 30,000 the previous year, and I didn't feel like I was driving as much as I would have liked, so I was hoping to get back to driving more, and now this year I'm on track to drive about 50,000-60,000 miles. I may have actually reached a point where it's a bit more than I'd like, maybe 40,000 would be ideal, but it's been good overall. I moved to Atlanta a few months ago, haven't established much in terms of local clients, so most of my jobs are out of town, within a 0-7 hour drive in all different directions (Memphis, Raleigh, Atlanta, Charlotte, Greesnsboro, Nashville, Birmingham, Cincinatti, New Orleans, Tampa, Jacksonville, Orlando, etc.). Atlanta being centrally located compared to where I used to live in Tampa has been great for me. I would like to get more local clients, but haven't gotten around to working on locally marketing myself more yet.

    Call me weird, but I like sleeping in my car, find it comfortable, convenient, free, and time saving. I sleep better in my car than in hotels, and get nice 7-8 hour sleeps. I'm able to lay down all the way in my car, legs fully stretched, on a few layers of comforters, so about as comfortable as a bed. Photo....



    My jobs pay enough that I could afford a hotel, I just feel that hotels to me are a waste of both time and money. Consider time - you spend 30 minutes finding and booking the hotel, then get there at 10pm...30 minutes checking in and unloading any equipment you don't want to leave in the car, then spend a good amount of time getting settled into the room, get your laptop out, browse DVXuser, reply to topics, turn the TV on, catch some movie on HBO that you get hooked on, two hours later the movie is done, get ready for sleep, and now it's 2am, four hours after you got to the hotel. Call time is 8am tomorrow, and you want to wake up at 7am to catch continental breakfast, plus you have to spend 15 or so minutes bringing gear back to the car. So, all told you get 5 hours of sleep and wasted five hours awake at the hotel.

    Now on the other hand, sleeping in the car, you pull over at a rest stop or travel station where there are always lots of people also sleeping in their cars, you're probably not going to waste time watching a movie or browsing DVXuser, so what do you do? You go right to sleep, at, say 11pm (you left home a bit later since you knew you wouldn't be wasting so much time at a hotel). Wake up at 7:30am, grab some fast food (5 minutes), eat on way to shoot, and then you arrive with a good sleep and not having wasted so much time at a hotel.

    Now, the mentality of travel. Client asks me to do a job for say $2,300, it's six hours away, and I'm working as a local. 12 hour round trip. My mentality is, no wasting time at a hotel, no loosing money by going to a hotel, 12 hours of driving is fun, so not exactly work, the gas and vehicle wear and tear is around $150, so I'm making $2150 in profit. If the shoot ends at 5pm, I can be back home at 11pm, and ready to go for another shoot the next day, so even though there are 12 hours of driving plus an 8-10 hour shoot, I'm still only giving up one day of my time, and making $2150. Good money. I'm happy. Now, since I have the ability to travel cheaply and efficiently I can market myself in several major cities, and perhaps succeed at what a lot of freelancers struggle with, which is staying regularly busy with full rate jobs. Which is what I've been doing with this, regularly getting booked at around $2k and upward per day, driving a ton, and making $100k in the first 5.5 months of this year, and $26.5k in May, just from shooting (no editing). Not bad money for a single 31 year old.

    Now say someone has a different mentality toward travel. They get offered a $2300 job, but with 12 hours of travel, they think of it as a two day job, so $1150 per day. Then they spend $100 for hotel, and decide to get two hotel nights, so $200. They calculate their gas and wear and tear at the government rate instead of their actual losses, so imagine they loose $300 on that. Then instead of either packing food or eating cheap fast food, they go to nice/decent restaurants and spend $100 on food that would have been cheaper had they stayed home. Now, this $2300 per day job suddenly becomes a $850 per day job, which, if they own a lot of gear and are used to making $1k-2k per day, suddenly don't feel like they're making enough money. So what do they do? They pass on the job, sit at home, and make nothing. Because travel is too much for them and they're not able to enjoy it, do it efficiently, and cheaply. Nothing wrong with that; to each their own. I'm just saying it's been working well for me.



    Now a bit back to the original topic, as you can see from the photo above, there's not a lot of room for a full-size cart in there. The Remin Kartmaster HD-500 does look decently small, though 44 lbs seems a bit heavy. That could possibly work.

    I think my current cart could work too, and I just need to slim down my lighting kit. It's in a big, long Manfrotto bag now, so I'd like to get some smaller lights and put it in a bag half the size. Then with proper arrangement I could fit everything on one cartload, either with my current cart or a new cart.
    I left a senior position in the corporate world, as I didn't want a life as described above. Some revel in it. Our priorities in life are different. If all I have to think was money, money and more money, then why filming?


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    Senior Member Eric Coughlin's Avatar
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    Not sure of your point. I enjoy my job. It's not just about money. But you need money to make a living, and may as well try to capitalize to continually find ways to make more money while continuing to enjoy your job. It's not like you always have to choose between one or the other. At the end of the day no matter how much you enjoy your job it's still a business that you need to profit off of, unless you just do it as a side to a day job. I'd hardly compare how my job works to a typical corporate job.


    Quote Originally Posted by Josh Bass View Post
    When I think of making multiple trips, I am thinking of, since it's often the case, working in a fancy schmancy building where you have to move the gear quite a ways from where you parked, get through one or more layers of security, and one or more elevators to get to your eventual destination. If you have to do THAT multiple times, AND do it twice (beginning of shoot and end of shoot), it's quite a hassle and can add quite a bit of time to the day.
    Yeah, perhaps just 5%-10% of my jobs involve really long hauls through parking garages, elevators, security, etc., and often in those cases there's either a PA or producer to help with equipment. More often it's some corporateion in the suburbs, a residential home, etc., where the round trip may take just five minutes or less.
    Last edited by Eric Coughlin; 06-10-2018 at 11:32 AM.


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    Senior Member John Foundas's Avatar
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    This changed my life! No more yard sales in office lobbies or crosswalks.

    https://www.gripngaff.com/collections/bags

    I have two that hang off my RR Cart. They hold everything from light stands, tripods, sliders, gel rolls to C stands.

    Greatest invention in the history of earth.
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Foundas View Post
    This changed my life! No more yard sales in office lobbies or crosswalks.

    https://www.gripngaff.com/collections/bags

    I have two that hang off my RR Cart. They hold everything from light stands, tripods, sliders, gel rolls to C stands.

    Greatest invention in the history of earth.
    Wow, have not seen these. I think one for my Rock & Roller carts would make life a lot easier. Thanks!
    It's a business first and a creative outlet second.
    G.A.S. destroys lives. Stop buying gear that doesn't make you money.


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    #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Coughlin View Post

    Yeah, perhaps just 5%-10% of my jobs involve really long hauls through parking garages, elevators, security, etc., and often in those cases there's either a PA or producer to help with equipment. More often it's some corporateion in the suburbs, a residential home, etc., where the round trip may take just five minutes or less.
    Gotcha. For me, especially when Im the shooter (vs being the grip or prompter op) those would be the norm for me but like the guy said above, different lives.


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    #39
    Senior Member Spartacus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Coughlin View Post
    Let me give an example beyond a PA of how one-man-banding can be a lot more profitable. Say a client comes to me with a $3600 budget for an interview shoot. Now, say I don't know their budget, but I can quote them two ways. The first one which may be your preferred (or typical) way...me (DP), C300 Mark II, L-series lenses, lighting, tripod ($1900), sound operator w/gear ($850), gaffer/grip ($600), PA ($250), for a total of $3600. Perhaps I'm up-charging the crew rates for a total of $250, so I'm getting $2150 from the job in profit.

    (...)

    A few months ago a potential client said they had $1500 in the budget for me and an audio guy. I said my rates started at $1500 at the time, so I could do audio and take the full budget. They considered it, but ended up not hiring me. But sometimes these cases do work out, and it's cases like these, where the clients have limited budget, but still enough budget for you to make good profit, if the crew is cut down. Again, only crew that isn't actually needed. Most shoots I can handle my own audio, and when I can't, I make sure we have an audio guy.
    You seem to be in a good spot there. Our market has been corrupted by people showing up with A7s, a G3 and a 1x1 LED doing interview shoots for close to nothing. And to be fair: You will survive most situations with this setup and can even deliver excellent work with it (cause as we know, it's the person behind the camera bla bla bla).
    Still I manage to get similar day rates like you quote BUT I could never score a full crew budget for showing up alone. I mean, most of my clients do video regularly. So at some point they know the rates.
    How in hell do you pull this off?
    They simply don't care..?
    (as in Google the rental value of a C300II, a light kit and a microphone and deduct from 3600 and see your day rate would be 2600$ish?)

    I actually like the sleeping in the car idea, but what about going to the toilet and taking a shower?
    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
    I LIKE FOOD. FOOD IS GOOD.
    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::


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    #40
    U-matic Member groveChuck's Avatar
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    Obviously, whatever "fits" one's style and preference, works for them.

    My RnR cart fits, wheels up, and I put a bag or case inside it, then another layer on top. And another, if needed.

    Setup for the RnR (push cable, pull up handle, push cable, pull up handle, extend cart, lock) I can't see taking more than 5 seconds- not exactly onerous preps.

    I've had clients (engineers, CNC machinists, artists, developers, execs- all types) say "what a brilliant design".
    Mine's 10-12 yrs old, and I replaced the pneumatic rear tires with airless ones. I bike a lot so flats weren't really a problem since I have a pump close by at home, but these airless tires are a great improvement, 30% lighter and low rolling resistance:

    wheel.jpg
    https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produ..._3_r_trac.html

    Multiple trips- doesn't "fit" for me. Mostly hi-rise offices with parking garages, office parks with surface parking a 5 minute walk just from vehicle to front door, and some luxury hi-rise condos. Can't say I shoot in houses or park in driveways much...

    I added my own top shelf and a bottom platform to the RnR, but thanks to John for reminding me about the gaff bags (I meant to get one a year ago)!

    Sleeping in the SUV, at 6' 5", is not a good "fit" or goal of mine. I've done it overnight once intentionally, and a couple of times where I just couldn't stay awake on a long drive back after 1 or 2am. Long distance vacation driving, I'll overnight a night here and there in the SUV (Ford Escape Hybrid, 35+ mpg), or between camping locations.
    Work driving is at best tolerable for me with good music or some Radiolab, but I wouldn't define it as "fun", especially with gridlock that adds an unknowable 2x or 3x to the actual "drive time".

    So, yeah, whatever "fits" your flow, go with it...


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