Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. Collapse Details
    Vertical and horizontal movement. What's out there?
    #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    997
    Default
    If you are using DSLRs or even when I had my FS7, moving the camera is as easy as pie. But since I sold my FS7 and moved to a full size rig things changed quite a bit. Good news is when using the full sized level of cameras there is normally budget to rent gear. But I still like to have my own gear for some things. Like special interesting low budget projects. My remote head jib is a no go now. Ditto slider. I have a track dolly but it's not always possible to lay track or take it to a shoot etc. So I need new gear.

    Sliders are probably out for horizontal moves. Unless something heavy duty like a Matthews Slider. But to be honest I find sliders limiting with a full sized rig. Them beefy sliders are very expensive too. I would rather have something like the Matthews Dutti Dolly. Can do the job of a slider and dolly at the same time, as well as a table top dolly, doorway dolly and even use it underslung etc. Sliders can be underslung. But can't do all the above. So something like the Dutti Dolly seems the best option. But maybe I'm overlooking other options? I know there are several types of small pipe dollies and ladder dollies similar to the Dutti Dolly. But I really like the concept of the Dutti the best. But what other concepts and ways of moving a full sized camera horizontally are out there right now?

    For vertical I guess a small jib with a fluid head at the end is the easiest and most versatile. A long remote head jib for large cameras is way too expensive, hard to transport and set up. Or are there any other ideas?

    Of course a Technocrane, Chapman dolly etc would be great. But I'm talking something humanly affordable and usable with a very small team. For fully crewed stuff like I said they rent it anyway and I don't have to worry.


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    8,819
    Default
    I have a bmc micro that I can do "any" move with - crane and/or gimbal,

    My fs7-vlock-Miller head combo basically I only move it horizontally on a Dana style dolly or floor track.

    The only height changes I do are mounting the Dana track at a slight incline.

    Moving a larger camera/head in the vertical axis is the realm of heavy kit.


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    2,606
    Default
    Dana Dolly can easily handle a full size camera. The main thing is just gonna be the (tripod) head that you put on it. I have a MYT Works Large Slider for more down & dirty use and it can handle the weight of a full size ENG camera(30lbs+), too, but the way that the "hi-hat" sits in the carriage, it can tip/move in the carriage slightly it you tilt too far down with a large, heavy payload. MYT Works told me there are "caps" or something like that that can screw into the bottom of the hi-hat to prevent that, but that prevents you from quickly releasing it or attaching it(not a realistic option). So if you're not doing complex/compound movements, it will be more stable.

    I've never used the Dutti Dolly, but it seems like Matthews version of a Dana Dolly, but I don't think it works with curved track, like the DD.


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    997
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by morgan_moore View Post
    I have a bmc micro that I can do "any" move with - crane and/or gimbal,

    My fs7-vlock-Miller head combo basically I only move it horizontally on a Dana style dolly or floor track.

    The only height changes I do are mounting the Dana track at a slight incline.

    Moving a larger camera/head in the vertical axis is the realm of heavy kit.
    Yeah, small cameras such as the FS7 are a breezy to move.

    But moving a larger camera/head in the vertical axis doesn't have to be in the realm of heavy kit. There are several portable short jib arms which take fluid heads and are affordable and will take a full sized camera. Like I said I think this is pretty much the only option before getting into large cranes with remote heads. I just wanted to make sure I'm not overlooking any other type of gear. ;-)


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    997
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Run&Gun View Post
    Dana Dolly can easily handle a full size camera. The main thing is just gonna be the (tripod) head that you put on it. I have a MYT Works Large Slider for more down & dirty use and it can handle the weight of a full size ENG camera(30lbs+), too, but the way that the "hi-hat" sits in the carriage, it can tip/move in the carriage slightly it you tilt too far down with a large, heavy payload. MYT Works told me there are "caps" or something like that that can screw into the bottom of the hi-hat to prevent that, but that prevents you from quickly releasing it or attaching it(not a realistic option). So if you're not doing complex/compound movements, it will be more stable.

    I've never used the Dutti Dolly, but it seems like Matthews version of a Dana Dolly, but I don't think it works with curved track, like the DD.
    I'm pretty sure a variation of the Matthews Dutti dolly has been around since the 70s or 80s. Matthews is a much older company.

    On the surface the Dutti Dolly may look like the Dana and all the other pipe dollies out there. But it can actually do more. Such as be used without tracks. I also like the simplicity of it. It doesn't try to look like a cool robotic spider or something complicated. It's simple, effective and robust. I believe it's also the lowest to the floor option. If you want to do curved tracks, which will then be floor tracks just put the Dutti Dolly on skate wheel trucks. Done. I have looked at several other pipe dollies. Dana, Kessler, EZ-slider, MYT Constellation Skater, Doug Dolly and all the several others which seem to be just all copying each other. The Dutti stood out as the most original and versatile so far. I might be overlooking something else. This is why I started the thread.


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    8,819
    Default
    Yep a small jib is the next step after a "Dana" dolly.

    As for not heavy - well you need some definitions.
    20kg camera Package quickly needs 80kg of counter mass.

    http://www.hse.gov.uk/airtransport/i...ifting-all.jpg


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    349
    Default
    One of my favorite ways to shoot a lot of different angles in a short time is to throw a fluid head on my Seven Jib and then put the tripod or jib stand onto a heavy duty tripod dolly with lockable wheels. It is a beefy build, though. I've done this with set ups as heavy as an Alexa classic (sans EVF) & a Vinten Vision 20 head (similar to an O'Connor 1030 in size and payload). That's about as heavy a combo you can put on the Seven before things get nerve wracking. A draw bac is that the set up only works in spaces with enough room to maneuver around with the counter weighted tail end of the jib etc. But once you get the thing all built and balanced it's easy cheese to swing around for a variety of different shots or moves, unlock the dolly wheels to reposition into a new spot on the floor, etc.. For locked shots just frame and don't touch it (if it's properly balanced it will stay put), or grab the head/camera and handle it around for something that's neither handheld nor locked, but alive yet still heavy and steady. Kina fun to work with, but not a one-for-all solution (which really doesn't exist anyhow).


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    997
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by morgan_moore View Post
    Yep a small jib is the next step after a "Dana" dolly.

    As for not heavy - well you need some definitions.
    20kg camera Package quickly needs 80kg of counter mass.

    http://www.hse.gov.uk/airtransport/i...ifting-all.jpg
    Ok you are talking heavy as in counter weights. But counter weights are portable and easy to transport. I though you meant a large and heavy jib which is not easy to transport.

    The camera is a full sized Alexa.
    Last edited by Sttratos; 05-17-2018 at 01:40 AM.


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    997
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by keithlango View Post
    One of my favorite ways to shoot a lot of different angles in a short time is to throw a fluid head on my Seven Jib and then put the tripod or jib stand onto a heavy duty tripod dolly with lockable wheels. It is a beefy build, though. I've done this with set ups as heavy as an Alexa classic (sans EVF) & a Vinten Vision 20 head (similar to an O'Connor 1030 in size and payload). That's about as heavy a combo you can put on the Seven before things get nerve wracking. A draw bac is that the set up only works in spaces with enough room to maneuver around with the counter weighted tail end of the jib etc. But once you get the thing all built and balanced it's easy cheese to swing around for a variety of different shots or moves, unlock the dolly wheels to reposition into a new spot on the floor, etc.. For locked shots just frame and don't touch it (if it's properly balanced it will stay put), or grab the head/camera and handle it around for something that's neither handheld nor locked, but alive yet still heavy and steady. Kina fun to work with, but not a one-for-all solution (which really doesn't exist anyhow).
    The Seven Jib is exactly the type of small Jib I was thinking about. There are even shorter ones.

    I have done the jib on dolly thing. For locked shots it's also easy to just sit the jib head on a tripod. As you say limited basically by the space.

    So far it's looking like a small jib with fluid head on the end and a Dutti Dolly. But maybe somebody will point to a different piece of gear which hasn't been considered.
    Last edited by Sttratos; 05-17-2018 at 02:40 AM.


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    8,819
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Sttratos View Post
    Ok you are talking heavy as in counter weights. But counter weights are portable and easy to transport. I though you meant a large and heavy jib which is not easy to transport.

    The camera is a full sized Alexa.
    Ease of transport is entirely your evaluation

    Yep I think an Alexa is best managed on 'traditional' kit.. dana dolly, floor dolly, small jib.
    Its simple physics really.

    the other device..
    The only thing that I have no experience of but might be worth considering is a tripod with a hydaulic centre column. I think they are called sachler 'pod's or suchlike.

    If I were getting another tripod tasked with larger cameras Id certainly consider this.

    To me fine adjustment of height is critical to good composition.

    Stepping up Chapman have a 'small' dolly.. the Cobra http://www.chapmanleonard.com/dollies/cobra.html


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •