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    #11
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    At this point commercial (pretty much DJI) battery tech is such that this is an exceedingly rare thing to have happen.

    There's probably an equal chance your camera battery (or one of those massive V-Locks or AB Golds) catches fire and causes the same problem.


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    #12
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    Dec 2010
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    The point of the post is not whether or not the story has its facts straight, but rather, the idea of the liabilities of operating a drone. It made me think about what things could happen if I operated a drone that I would not have foreseen.

    Life throws you curve balls. For example, someone in my neighborhood (we have large lots of 2 more acres) was mowing his field during the dry season. The story in the paper was that he hit a rock and the spark started a fire which ended up burning down 3 houses. I didn't believe the story. I couldn't believe a spark had enough heat to start a fire. I thought there had to be gasoline or something else involved. I talked to the fire department and they confirmed the ignition was from the blade hitting a rock. They also said it happens on a regular basis. It made me much more thoughtful about mowing my field in the dry season.


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    #13
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    But when you buy a cow to keep the grass short, also be carefull with open fire, their methane farts can throw large flames.


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    #14
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    I think you are taking the wrong message away from this story. A 24ft camera crane in the wrong hands can be 10 times more dangerous than a camera drone. The lesson to me is always hire the specialist and professional because the hidden gems of wisdom that only come from experience are truly worth their weight in gold. Good drone operators know how to keep batteries healthy so they don't suddenly burst into fire, just like a good camera operator knows to lock a tripod head when they walk away from the camera so it doesn't fall on it's face. Almost any job on a set you put someone in who doesn't have the experience and they are capable of damaging equipment or worse.

    also the link is dead, was the article pulled?


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    #15
    Senior Member thekreative's Avatar
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    Jul 2007
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    SaltSpring Island, B.C.
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    #16
    Senior Member egproductions's Avatar
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    Drone's seem a lot more intimidating then they really are. That being said, saftey should always be your number concern when flying. Taking the part107 helps understand aspects of saftey but you also have to use your head when flying. You begin to learn where and how to fly and where is too risky.
    Cameras: 2x - Sony FS7, 2x - Sony A6500, Canon 5D IV, DJI Mavic Pro, Canon 5D II, Canon 60D, Canon G16, Canon Rebel XT, GoPro Hero 7, Gopro Hero 6 (RIP), 6x - GoPro Hero 3+ Black Edition, Canon XL2, iPhone 4, iPhone 6, Ricoh KR-10, Fed-2, Fujica Half Frame, Canon ZR-100, Sony DCR-TRV 310.


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    #17
    Senior Member Run&Gun's Avatar
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    Jan 2014
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