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    #11
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    Jim, I pretty much reached the same conclusion as you.....I'm not likely to use this mic very much so I'm going to give the extension a miss.

    Fitting a low profile XLR connector may be an option I'll consider down the track.

    I also have the ME66+K6 (the ME67 has the K6P) and a AT-875R so I'm not sure that I'll get the ME64.

    Something like the Rode NTG-3 might be a better purchase (if the need arises)


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    #12
    Senior Member GaryNattrass's Avatar
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    If I remember these extension tubes tend not to work very well. AKG did one of the 451 range and it was pretty dreadful as I recall this one was too.

    A long shotgun still has it's uses but a second hand sennheiser 816 etc or a rode is designed to do the job perfectly.
    Over 15 minutes in broadcast film and tv production: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1044352
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    #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noiz2 View Post
    I hadn't heard the term low profile XLR, so didn't realize we were talking about essentially the same thing!

    So now two votes for right angle connectors. They shave off more than you would think because they are shorter and you don't have the cable adding to the length.
    A low profile XLR connector is more than just a right angle XLR, they're not necessarily the same thing. As a low profile is even thinner.
    Am a Sound Recordist in New Zealand: http://ironfilm.co.nz/sound/
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    #14
    Senior Member paulears's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by paulears
    As long as it doesn't hit the screen when you move it quickly, it's fine. Mine is also a tight fit, and if I shake mine vigorously fore and aft, I can just make contact!


    That isn't quite right Paul. Alex is correct, though equidistance isn't critical: it can be further back, though, obviously, this increases booming distance.
    I don't quite understand your reasoning here?

    When you put brand X into brand Z, lack of space is common. In the past, I've resorted to removing the cable gland from a Neutrik female, and using epoxy to allow the thin cable I use to the outside to emerge from the side, and shorten the XLR by enough to get the end cap on! Keeping in mind the capsule is always near the centre, the critical thing that messes up performance is mechanical noise from the mic hitting the front or rear of the housing. My placement is entirely down to fitting a too long mic into a too short housing, and when placed properly, they work fine.

    Of course, the right housing for the right mic is always best - but Rycotes are always found containing 'the wrong mics' - If you need to put an alternate mic inside, then simple steps work.
    Last edited by paulears; 02-14-2018 at 01:39 AM.


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    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulears View Post
    I don't quite understand your reasoning here?
    I think this is addressing my point: as I said, the OP may well be fine using a shotgun mic that is right up near the front of the Rode blimp, assuming that it doesn't knock it. But a mic won't give the same attenuation of wind noise as if it was set back to the rear of the front cap, for the reasons set out in my first post (and for more on this, as I said, read more from an expert such as Chris Woolf).

    This may seem slightly odd with a shotgun, with its long interference tube meaning that the capsule is well away from the front of the blimp. If you test a shotgun, though, it is obvious that the inverse-square law doesn't apply as you might think it does: the signal falls away very quickly in the first few centimetres from the tip of the shotgun, not as much as a cardioid or hypercardioid placed similarly close to a sound source, but much more so than a cardioid or hypercardioid with its capsule placed back where that of the shotgun mic is located. I have just checked this using lower frequencies (40, 50 and 60hz) and this is much more evident than with higher frequencies: given that wind energy is so heavily skewed to the low frequencies this is particularly interesting. So the signal from a sound source very close to the tip of a shotgun mic (say 5-10mm) will be much louder than, say, 40mm distance: this is very relevant to the attenuation of the low frequency wind noise where it hits the surface of the windshield/blimp. The other possible source of wind noise for a mic in a windshield is residual wind that permeates the windshield: I am not sure how significant this is - if at all - as it is hard to test (though the better performance of omni mics in blimps in higher wind may suggest it is a factor). If it is a factor, it is worth noting that the front of a shotgun mic is just as sensitive to wind noise as the front of a mic (say a hypercardioid) with the capsule located at the front of the mic.

    Other mic set ups that can mean wind noise attenuation of a windshield is reduced include squeezing LDCs and stereo pairs (e.g. ORTF) into standard shotgun blimps, where mics again can end up a few millimeters from the tube of the blimp/windshield.

    The low-profile XLR connector (which is right angled), whether DIY as you describe or a commercial version (more easily available now, and very useful for sound bags), is, as I keep saying, a very cheap and easy solution for the OP to be able to get the full wind noise attenuation of the Rode blimp with the particular (slightly too long) shotgun.

    Cheers,

    Roland
    Last edited by Throwback; 02-14-2018 at 05:50 AM. Reason: carried out a few tests on shotguns


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    #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by IronFilm View Post
    A low profile XLR connector is more than just a right angle XLR, they're not necessarily the same thing. As a low profile is even thinner.
    Exactly, David: the additional space saving is why I suggested them over a regular right-angled XLRs. They are also lighter, which is never to be sniffed at when dealing with weight at the end of a boom pole. For those who haven't come across them, here are a few examples of what we are talking about:

    http://www.studiocare.com/cable-tech...connector.html
    http://ambient.de/en/product/low-pro...lr-connectors/
    http://locationsoundcables.com/?page_id=11

    Cheers,

    Roland


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    #17
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    Yup, I just ordered earlier this week a couple more cables with low profile XLR connectors
    Am a Sound Recordist in New Zealand: http://ironfilm.co.nz/sound/
    Follow my vlog and adventures in sound: https://www.youtube.com/c/SoundSpeeding


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