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    HD Videos with old footages treatment.
    #1
    Junior Member
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    I have an AVP project that would require me to merry newly acquired HD videos and old, 1970's, videos. Obviously, I can't just put the old footages on HD timeline. At the least, i would need a treatment that would still look good in modern age. I was thinking of video on video, or 3D animation. I wanted it to be organic as possible. Not too digital or sci-fi.

    File footages would be about 60% of the whole timeline. So it would be the majority of my final edit.

    I hope anyone could give me a lead on pegs.

    Suggestions would be really appreciated.


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    #2
    Sound Ninja Noiz2's Avatar
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    Red Giant had a suite of plugins that were designed to upres SD to HD. That is where I would look first.
    Cheers
    SK


    Scott Koue
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    ďIt ainít ignorance that causes all the troubles in this world, itís the things that people know that ainít soĒ

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    #3
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    Yeah I use Red Giant's / Magic Bullet Instant HD plugin (and Instant 4K) a lot. Perhaps the hardest part of working with old footage is that it is 4X3 vs 16x9 of the new footage. So Instant HD either lets you up-res to fill the 16X9 frame ( you lose some of the top/bottom) or lets you up res to the vertical edge, leaving the sides empty.
    Depending on how good the old material is, often up resing to fill the entire frame makes it so large that it really shows the poor quality of the footage. So another trick is to use the footage with motion graphics to help take up the extra space so you don't have to up res the footage as much.


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    #4
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    As far as the 4x3 footage in the wider ratio, what networks started to do back in 2008/2009 when everyone was transitioning is they duplicated the left and right edges of the video (it varied by taste) and blurred them a bit.

    I do not remember what this is called but that's the main description of the effect, and it's still an industry-standard practice done today.

    Because the extended edges are identical to the 4x3 edges, it tricks the brain a little bit when filling the screen.


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    #5
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    P.S. Here's an example. It's a clip from WWE as I personally remember seeing them do it first because they also started to shoot HD very early and needed to mix an astronomical amount of 4x3 footage with their new 16x9 content every week.

    Example.jpg


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