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    LEAVE NOW Feature film shot on Panasonic GH3
    #1
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    Hi everyone,

    Here's a trailer for a feature film I shot on the GH3.

    https://vimeo.com/151169958

    If you've been kind enough to take the time to watch it, many thanks!


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    #2
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    Looks great. Trailer is from 2 years ago?

    I love that everyone is obsessing over the GH5, GH5s, GH5s.348g, etc. Meanwhile, you have what looks to be a really promising film, beautifully captured using perhaps the least lauded GH camera. Much respect to you!

    O


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    #3
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    Thanks O,

    The date of the trailer goes back to an earlier version made before the film was finished. This one is from about 9 months ago. I'm now submitting to festivals.

    The GH3 worked a treat for me. Perhaps things would have been easier with the GH4 but it wasn't out when we were ready to shoot. If you wait for the next camera, you wait forever! I'd attribute 25% of the look of the film to the GH3, 25% to a film emulation plug-in and 50% to the Voigtlander lens we used. I've seen it on the big screen at a festival where it was up against films shot on much higher spec cameras and it stood up really well.

    Best wishes and thanks for watching!

    Stephen


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    #4
    Senior Member bill totolo's Avatar
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    Not a bad looking frame. Very well done!
    Bill Totolo
    L.A.

    www.billtotolo.com


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    #5
    Senior Member El Director's Avatar
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    Well lit and sounds pretty good too. Nice work!


    Independent Filmmaker
    BMD URSA Mini 4K/Avid Media Composer/NukeX/Blender/Mixcraft/ProTools/Resolve Studio

    Feature Films
    Wulf - 2008 | Leap - 2010 | Leap: Rise of the Beast - 2011 | Surviving The Wild - 2020


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    #6
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    looks very good.

    gh3 really did you well.

    if i may ask, what film emulation plug-in did you employ?

    lastly, did you use the entire voightlander set?

    if not, fav lenses?

    again, thumbs up.

    be well.

    rob
    smalltalk productions/nyc
    the story is never black & white
    it takes Smalltalk to reveal the color

    smalltalk.productions


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    #7
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    Hi Rob,

    I used FilmConvert Pro as an emulation plugin. I applied it to each indivudual cut, and whilst I tended to gravitate towards one particular preset for most shots (I can't remember which preset but could find out if you're interested) it would vary a bit from shot to shot.

    I used the Voigtlander 17.5, 25 and 42.5 (is that the complete set?) also a Canon FD 100, which matched the voigtlanders pretty well. Finally I used a 14mm panasonic pancake which I didn't much like but needed it to put the camera inside a very confined space for one particular and important shot.

    I'm not particularly experienced in these matters to be honest, but I did a huge amount of research, not least here on dvxuser which played a big part in my decision to go with the GH3 and the Voigtlanders. I was looking for something that was a) within my budget and b) created an image that told my story in the past tense, if that makes any sense.

    I'm very glad you liked what you saw! Thanks and best wishes.


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    Senior Member Jaime Valles's Avatar
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    Looks great! Let us know when it's playing somewhere or available to stream or download. Very interested in seeing this!
    Jaime VallÚs
    AJV Media
    Video, Photography & Graphic Design: www.ajvmedia.com


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    #9
    Senior Member abreu-canedo's Avatar
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    Nice! I love those sea side shots of the boat with the sun low in the sky. Wow!


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    #10
    Rockin the Boat
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    First off - CONGRATULATIONS, finishing a feature - or indeed a short is an accomplishment. Seriously.

    Some idle thoughts... closeup, medium, long - traditionally, in films that are meant to be seen on the large screen in a theater, these have pretty standard parameters. You sort of see the same distance from a subject (within a fairly tight range) for each as appropriate. One thing I've noticed, is that small indies shot on DSLRs, frequently violate these standards. Somehow they often settle in an uncomfortable region between closeup and medium. Now, the discomfort might come entirely from being habituated to the traditional standards, rather than some kind of artistic or technical flaw. But I actually don't know. Could it be, that the human eye/brain is naturally more comfortable with certain distance conventions? I mean, when the closeup was first invented, it also felt pretty odd to the audience, but they eventually got used to it. But there is the old argument that somehow these conventions evolved for a reason, and that reason being that human psychology makes those conventions work, and violating them (unless there is a good reason!), feels like a "mistake", or simply "wrong". In other words, the psychology dictated the standards, rather than the standards habituated us to feel psychological comfort with these conventions.

    In any case, judging just by this trailer, you too do the "in-between" distance - not quite a closeup and much closer than a medium. Of course, there are a number of conventional closeups and mediums, but I'm talking about the overall impression. I freely admit to being made uncomfortable - I instictively feel like I'm pushed way too close to the faces, a kind of violation of personal space, as happens should someone stand too close to you at a party or whatnot. Meanwhile, real intimacy is OK, because you're *really* close (as when kissing someone) - so that feels fine, but it's that in-between distance that's irksome. Interesting side note - in real life, personal space is not inherent, but cultural, so for example, in South American countries, people stand much closer to each other when interacting than in the U.S. and most of Northern Europe.

    I wonder how you selected these distances, or was that your DP or cam op's choice? Was it driven in any way by your lens choices or camera? Thank you, and again, CONGRATULATIONS!


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