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    #11
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    DMC Thanks for the reply - but your dead wrong!

    Your comments of “should not be a problem” tells me your only guessing. Not sure how many low light events you have taped, but I’v shot thousands of these low light gigs where the subjects is always moving.

    On any closed in sporting event, which as confined like this one, one thing you don’t want is; to have the camera operator and his helper interfering with the event. In this situation your is better off moving to the perimeter of the room at different locations shoot the material. By shooting in 4K, you will have plenty of opportunities to push in for the close ups and you’ll also have a wide shot to give a A/B camera look.

    You need to understand these kids are not actors, so in the same respect, they are not going to keep an exact distances from the camera so there is no way he is going to be in focus for more than a few seconds, especially if he is up close to the subject.

    In these same shooting situations the last thing you’ll want is too have light fixtures sitting on light stands with plugs and wires draped over the floor. Its a sure bet where someone going to injure themselves and take your lights out. Also, fixed lighting in this shoot environment is surely going to be blocked by other players and will never provide the correct lighting as a camera light will. Keep in mind, anytime your pointing at the talent the camera light is perfectly aimed for the shot, you’ll never get that with fixed permitter lighting.


    Regarding your cheap light comments, you need to get up to speed on LED light fixtures, this small lamp puts out the light of a 500 watt fixture and runs for hours on these small batteries. They are high quality with aluminum housing. They have two controls to adjust the separate temperature lamp sets to a match any lighting situation.

    These normally sell for $300, B&H had them on sale and they are throwing in the batteries and charger. I’ve been using these camera lights for years, you can’t even begin to compare the shots to the same camera without a light. Not sure how knowledgable you are with the DVX200 but she's not a low light camera by any standards.

    Regards - Mike


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    #12
    Senior Member Design Media Consultants's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Mas View Post
    DMC Thanks for the reply - but your dead wrong!

    Your comments of “should not be a problem” tells me your only guessing. Not sure how many low light events you have taped, but I’v shot thousands of these low light gigs where the subjects is always moving.

    On any closed in sporting event, which as confined like this one, one thing you don’t want is; to have the camera operator and his helper interfering with the event. In this situation your is better off moving to the perimeter of the room at different locations shoot the material. By shooting in 4K, you will have plenty of opportunities to push in for the close ups and you’ll also have a wide shot to give a A/B camera look.

    You need to understand these kids are not actors, so in the same respect, they are not going to keep an exact distances from the camera so there is no way he is going to be in focus for more than a few seconds, especially if he is up close to the subject.

    In these same shooting situations the last thing you’ll want is too have light fixtures sitting on light stands with plugs and wires draped over the floor. Its a sure bet where someone going to injure themselves and take your lights out. Also, fixed lighting in this shoot environment is surely going to be blocked by other players and will never provide the correct lighting as a camera light will. Keep in mind, anytime your pointing at the talent the camera light is perfectly aimed for the shot, you’ll never get that with fixed permitter lighting.


    Regarding your cheap light comments, you need to get up to speed on LED light fixtures, this small lamp puts out the light of a 500 watt fixture and runs for hours on these small batteries. They are high quality with aluminum housing. They have two controls to adjust the separate temperature lamp sets to a match any lighting situation.

    These normally sell for $300, B&H had them on sale and they are throwing in the batteries and charger. I’ve been using these camera lights for years, you can’t even begin to compare the shots to the same camera without a light. Not sure how knowledgable you are with the DVX200 but she's not a low light camera by any standards.

    Regards - Mike
    First off, everything you said is a guess. So don't point out that I am guessing. Duh. Obviously we are not there to have all the facts. But you outlaid a detailed shooting sequence without knowing facts. So you are the one totally guessing. In my opinion that is stupid. Period.

    The lighting depends of what the client expects. But to get high quality shots of a martial arts scenario requires some choreography and proper lighting. As I stated, duh, if it is only to record the sequence of events as they happen, without interrupting the event, then you would be more limited on lighting. But proper pre planning would also allow you to improve the lighting.

    Thousands of low light gigs? Right. Paid gigs I suppose. Sounds like horse manure.

    I stated that the DVX is not a low light camera. We have been using the DVX for over a year. Regarding LED lights, all I use are LEDs. And the light you showed, was a cheap on camera $100 light. Now you are changing your tune and talking about other more expensive lights. I am sure in today's age everyone is familiar with LED lights. I have owned martial arts schools and have shot a fair amount of these events. This is not hockey or a professional football games. It appears to be a small MA event or maybe even an MA class. If you plan and know what you are doing you can work around it.
    Last edited by Design Media Consultants; 10-13-2017 at 06:50 PM.


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    #13
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    First of all, I would really like to thank all of you for for the detailed replies/hints/tips & tricks!

    On a day 2 filming, I've used a monopod and filmed it all as 24p - 1/48 - iso 1200 - iris 3,8-4,2

    The results are way much better than the ones I shot as 50p 1/180 iso 3200! There is some blur here and there, but you don't really notice it unless video is paused during the action scene.

    And now some comments:


    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Knoop View Post
    You can't put the light behind a person who watches the event? Or at least put one on your camera! Without good light you can't have a good looking video not even with a million dollar low light camera. Light makes or breaks the image!

    You're absolutely right, light IS essential in every shoot, but I'm in a situation where I'm not paid in advance, I'm on a really tight budget, so I have to rely on what I have



    Quote Originally Posted by Design Media Consultants View Post

    and there are more camera functions that work at HD.

    It is hard to judge by one frame but the shot looked cluttered and not well composed.

    The DVX has some great exposure tools, start using them and do not rely on the LCD. It will fool you every time.

    Yes, I'm going to film day 3 in HD mode for Hybrid IOS, since I'd need to chase & film some fighters, and it's really tough to carry 7 kilos (13lbs) in one hand for more than 20 seconds. (camera + external mic + glidecam XR with weights).
    As for the exposition, I'm actively using zebra, and it seems to help



    >>>these kids are not actors, so in the same respect, they are not going to keep an exact distances from the camera so there is no way he is going to be in focus for more than a few seconds, especially if he is up close to the subject.


    Exactly! Filming kids is already hard, since they move fast, have difference in height and keep looking in the camera, ruining the shot. Also, they're supposed to do what their MA instructor says and I cannot interfere in any way, so zooming helps a lot in this case.


    >>>In these same shooting situations the last thing you’ll want is too have light fixtures sitting on light stands with plugs and wires draped over the floor. Its a sure bet where someone going to injure themselves and take your lights out.


    That's what I'm trying to avoid. But! If it was a commercial shoot, with lets say just 2 fighters in a ring, then of course I'd have to use 2 light stands and film with 2 cameras, since it would be a planned shot.
    But my assignment is to film real life training and compose a small motivating video for kids.


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