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    Anyone looking at the Canon GX10 4k to buy?
    #1
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    Hello
    I posted a question on the SOny part, but no response, I am looking at these 2 cameras The Sony FDR-AX700 and GX10 4k.
    I have the Vixia G30, and really like the low light and 1080 resolution, and I would like to move to 4k.
    I do a lot of run and gun and auto modes. The sony is 600$ cheaper

    Anyone out there looking at one of these cameras, and would love to hear your thoughts on which one you might choose. Can't wait until some reviews come out.

    Thank you


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    #2
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    For run and gun type work I would pick the Canon simply for the DP autofocus. I've been shooting with the Sony X70 for the past 2 years and it's AF is terrible, so I would be sure to confirm that the Sony AX700 AF is solid before considering it for this type of work.


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    #3
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    I have had 2 Canon Vixias, and you are right, the autofucus was most of the time spot on. Do you think they will make a G50, or is this it?


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    #4
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    They should...there's more than enough room for a $1200-$1300 4K G50 (with limited features).


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    #5
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    The Sony FDR-AX700 has phase detection autofocus so the autofocus performance should be much improved over the contrast-only autofocus used in the Sony X70. Whether this autofocus system is as good as Canon's dual pixel autofocus implementation in the GX10 remains to be seen, but some of the other Sony cameras that use their phase detection system (like the a6500) have pretty good autofocus performance. The GX10 autofocus may be slightly better, but I wouldn't expect the difference to be that dramatic.

    The main differences between these compact Sony and Canon camcorders from my perspective are:

    Picture Profiles: One advantage of the the Sony AX700 over the Canon GX10 are the extensive picture profiles. The AX700 seems to have inherited a lot of the firmware (including picture profiles) from Sony's professional camcorders and includes support for various Cine profiles in addition to S-Log2, S-Log3, and HLG gammas which allow for more extensive color grading or shooting for HDR delivery. In contrast the Canon GX10 seems to mostly just support a standard and some kind of wide DR picture profile, but lacks a true log profile.

    High Frame Rates: The Sony cameras have the high frame rate options from the RX10 and other cameras including 240fps, 480fps, and 960fps recording. While the 480fps and 960fps options drop the resolution quite considerably, the 240fps mode is very close to full HD and the quality is pretty decent. In contrast the Canon cameras can only do 120fps in full HD (an option also supported by the Sony AX700).

    Lens Range: The Canon GX10 has a 15x optical zoom lens, while the Sony AX700 is only 12x. While this isn't a huge difference, it could have an impact in some situations depending on what you are shooting. Both lenses are f/2.8 to f/4.5 aperture. Both cameras also have a clean digital zoom option that takes advantage of the oversampling of the high resolution sensors (Sony calls theirs Clear Image Zoom, for Canon it's Advanced Zoom). In Sony's case since they are using a 20-megapixel sensor to start with, this works up to an 18x zoom in 4K or 24x in HD. For Canon, the sensor has fewer extra pixels to begin with, so the Advanced Zoom only works in HD (doubling the optical zoom up to 30x total range).

    4K 60fps: This is the big thing the Sony is missing, the maximum frame rate for recording 4K (or actually UHD) is only 30fps. On the Canon you can record UHD at a full 60 fps. Canon also supports a slightly higher 150Mbps bitrate when recording UHD, even at 24 or 30 fps (the Sony can only do 100 Mbps maximum).


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