Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 23 of 23
  1. Collapse Details
    #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,832
    Default
    Yes at a whopping 8Mbps. Basically a proxy mode. This is a pretty small camera like the old XF100. Definitely not an XF300 replacement.


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #22
    Senior Member iggy097's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    151
    Default
    I am concerned about the battery life. My C100 goes forever on the extended batteries. If the XF400 doesn't perform well, I'll keep my C100 and get a C100 ii for my 2nd cam.


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    159
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by NorBro View Post
    According to Cinema5D, you at least have 8-bit 4:2:2 up to 25p externally in UHD. Not sure if true as new specs are initially sometimes messy on the internet, but it would make sense as everyone else offers at least 8-bit 4:2:2 over HDMI.
    The HDMI output is likely 4:2:2 for 2160p30 and below as support for 4:2:0 subsampling was only introduced in HDMI 2.0 along with 2160p60 support. This has generally meant that for HDMI output up to 2160p30, most cameras output at least 8-bit 4:2:2 which maximizes compatibility with displays that only support HDMI 1.4.

    When outputting 2160p60 over HDMI, then 8-bit 4:2:0 is much more common (even though HDMI 2.0 supports up to 12-bit 4:2:2). It's possible this is also to maximize compatibility. 2160p60 at 8-bit 4:2:0 actually fits within the 10.2-Gbps/300MHz bandwidth supported by HDMI 1.4 (any higher bit-depth or subsampling requires 18Gbps/600MHz bandwidth). Which meant that in some cases manufacturers could take existing 10.2Gbps HDMI chips only designed HDMI 1.4, make a few firmware tweaks to add support for 2160p60 at 8-bit 4:2:0 and re-certify them for HDMI 2.0. This is in part because it's not actually required to support all the different possible signal formats to be considered HDMI 2.0 compatible. More on HDMI 2.0 at:
    http://www.hdmi.org/manufacturer/hdm...i_2_0_faq.aspx

    Signals that use the full 18Gbps/600MHz bandwidth (2160p60 at 10-bit or higher or 4:2:2 or higher) also put greater demands on cable performance and there is a new "Premium High Speed HDMI" cable testing and certification program for such cables. But for signals like 2160p60 @ 8-bit 4:2:0 that fit within the 10.2Gbps/300MHz bandwidth, older "High Speed HDMI" (Category 2) cables designed for HDMI 1.4 should work fine. More on the "Premium High Speed" HDMI cable designation at:
    https://www.hdmi.org/press/press_release.aspx?prid=141


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •