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    Real Estate photography technique?
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    I wanted to see what you guys had to say. Is the current trend to make the the photos really bright?
    h1.JPGh2.JPGh3.JPGh4.JPGh5.JPGh6.JPG
    Would you photo them at this exposure or raise them in post to get this look?


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    Bumping up the exposure in post will raise the noise floor, it's best to expose it how you want it in camera and just do minor tweaks in post.


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    Thank you Imamacuser.
    Those examples look unrealistically bright to me, as in there's no way that house looks like that really, but I am not a real estate photog. Is this the norm these days?
    Any other techniques to achieve that look?


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    I had an apprentice called James.. he has got annoyingly good at photographing property.. it might be worth checking him out. You will see that while 'bright' there is 'motivation to the light and the surfaces that are countra jour (opposite the windows) are still a little darker than the other surfaces..

    http://chetwoderam.com/architectural...r-photography/


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    Mod v2.0 Noel Evans's Avatar
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    I shot a friends apartment. Had to research the how. But short answer is wide angle and to use bracketed exposure plus external flash. Found correct exposure then took a shot -2 stops -1 stop, ev, +1, +2 using a remote shutter release. Then process.
    w: Noel Evans TV

    e: noel@noelevans.tv
    p: +61 (0) 408 455 374


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    Here's a tutorial that explains a similar process.


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    Thank you very much, everyone.
    It's funny I actually had found the youtube tutorial posted and watched about half of it previously. I was hoping for a way to do it in camera with little or no post work.

    The RAM website link above also has the bright photos. I guess this is the way it's done now and what people want.

    I used to light rooms so the windows didn't blow out and you could see the pretty scenery outdoors as well as indoors but when you compare that way to these bright photos in this thread, they look dark. I'm behind the times

    Looks like the multiple exposure photos and blending them in post is the way....
    Last edited by firehawk; 05-21-2017 at 07:57 PM.


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    send1.jpg
    Here's a single shot jpeg photo I modified in post with aggressive brightness and contrast adjustments, trying to get a similar bright look.


    What's the easiest way to post bracketed exposures? Shoot raw and take them into Lightroom?
    I really don't want to bring several exposures of each shot into Photoshop and blend them all.


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    I don't have Lightroom, I use Camera raw in Photoshop but I am confident they are the same. In ACR there is a menu dropdown for "merge to HDR". So select the bracket, invoke merge to HDR and it will create a new DNG raw file using the bracket. You can then adjust in the usual manner. I have used this technique on a few jobs so far including an entire hotel with very satisfactory results. You don't end up with that horrific false looking HDR either. It looks incredibly natural and as I said is adjustable. There is a caveat though in my experience so far: the jobs I did were done without using flash. I found in brief experimenting that this technique generated weird problems with a bracket that had some flash element in it. If there was a white bed sheet it would clip it quite badly and show some severe artefacts.
    All the hotels I have done up to this one I used flash and comped in windows etc later but with the technique above that is not necessary BUT the end look is different to had flash been used. It is less crisp is the only way I can describe it. My client loved it so the next one I'm doing will be done the same way.
    I only had to retouch a very few things like some frosted stripes on a lounge window that reacted very badly with the HDR process.
    It is a very fast way of working if that's what the time and budget insists on. I have processed files in this manner for an editorial interiors photographer who always brackets and then blends using layers in Photoshop and the HDR technique ended up in the same place with fantastic results in minutes compared to hours over about 20 files. It even got the perfect amount of flare in the windows right.
    I use this technique when shooting 360's as well. Bracket every frame, create the HDR dng and then send those frames to the VR software, in my case PT gui. Works amazingly well.


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    I might be out of date with the tech but Ive always done manual merging in photoshop. How can a computer 'know' which bit you want from which frame?

    --

    Your shot does not adhere to what I said about subtle light levels.. your light has no motivation.. aka the front of the bed is brighter than the sides of the bed.. but the sides of the bed are lit by the windows (as the viewer understands it) and the front of the bed is lit by 'nothing' (yes I know a flash - but no motivating source that the viewer understands)

    I think this 'bright' look (done well) is all about narrow lighting ratios.. ie a lot of fill, but not so much fill that the fill overides the key (which is the windows)

    S


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