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    GH5 V LOG Proper Exposure
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    Hey all,

    I've been searching around for an answer to this, but I was wondering if anyone could shed light on the proper exposure for V Log on the GH5. I used V Log on the GH4 and remember that stopping up 1-2 generally provided better results than 0. Is this true for the GH5, too? I have not been able to get my hands on another copy of V Log yet, so I am unable to do any tests.

    Thanks!


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    Well from my experience, shooting in log with Canon log 2,usually the skin tones should be within 45-60 IRE. Black around 12 and highlights clip at 88~92. Since its log your waveform should be within those confines but as long as you expose the subject properly, the highlights will take care of themselves. Slightly overexposed and bringing it down is alot better than underexposed footage.


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    Senior Member Bern Caughey's Avatar
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    Here's Barry's take on exposing V-Log L on the DVX200.

    http://pro-av.panasonic.net/en/dvx4k...ef_vol6_en.pdf


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    Senior Member Thomas Smet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by conraddmb118 View Post
    Hey all,

    I've been searching around for an answer to this, but I was wondering if anyone could shed light on the proper exposure for V Log on the GH5. I used V Log on the GH4 and remember that stopping up 1-2 generally provided better results than 0. Is this true for the GH5, too? I have not been able to get my hands on another copy of V Log yet, so I am unable to do any tests.

    Thanks!
    Looked better in terms of what? 1-2 stops over is not a rule. It was a suggestion by some people that wanted less noise. There are those who are appalled by noise and grain. There are other seasoned professionals like Shane Hurlbut and Barry Green who advise against shooting over. Barry feels shooting V-log at 0 is the most balanced and he is right. Shane thinks a stop under is the sweet spot and he is also right. So are those that think a stop over is better.

    When it comes to exposure like this there isn't a hard rule. You shoot what looks best to you just like there is no hard rule how a movie should be graded. All methods of exposure have pros and cons. Shooting over means a very thin range for the highs and potentially blowing out highlights which is typically a signature look of lower dynamic range cameras. Shooting at 0 or -1 may have more noise but the colors can be more accurate and you get a more balanced dynamic range between the highs and lows.

    There is an endless debate over ETTR and really it comes down to the personal choice of each shooter and how they prefer their image to look. ETTR is not a perfect end all magical solution however. It only really helps with noise but while doing that it sacrifices other aspects of the image.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Smet View Post
    Looked better in terms of what? 1-2 stops over is not a rule. It was a suggestion by some people that wanted less noise. There are those who are appalled by noise and grain. There are other seasoned professionals like Shane Hurlbut and Barry Green who advise against shooting over. Barry feels shooting V-log at 0 is the most balanced and he is right. Shane thinks a stop under is the sweet spot and he is also right. So are those that think a stop over is better.

    When it comes to exposure like this there isn't a hard rule. You shoot what looks best to you just like there is no hard rule how a movie should be graded. All methods of exposure have pros and cons. Shooting over means a very thin range for the highs and potentially blowing out highlights which is typically a signature look of lower dynamic range cameras. Shooting at 0 or -1 may have more noise but the colors can be more accurate and you get a more balanced dynamic range between the highs and lows.

    There is an endless debate over ETTR and really it comes down to the personal choice of each shooter and how they prefer their image to look. ETTR is not a perfect end all magical solution however. It only really helps with noise but while doing that it sacrifices other aspects of the image.
    Thanks to you all. I have found this to be true depending on what I'm shooting, but I wanted to be sure I wasn't going to be breaking any cardinal rules of v log on the GH cams. I'll report back with my humble opinion once I get it installed. Cheers!


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    Senior Member Bern Caughey's Avatar
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    Pushed Panasonic to add False Color to the GH5, even if it meant getting rid of Waveform, &/or Vectorscope. Would have made determining the proper exposure for V-Log, or Rec. 709, so much quicker, & more intuitive.

    When I work with Log C, or SLog, I'll look at the waveform if there's time, but live by False Color.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Hughes View Post
    Well from my experience, shooting in log with Canon log 2,usually the skin tones should be within 45-60 IRE
    Just as a point of reference, VLOG-L is not like Canon's or Sony's log curves, and should not be exposed as such. What may work for other curves such as Canon Log 2, won't work properly with VLOG-L, because the split between over & under is radically different on VLOG-L as vs. other gammas. Using the basis of 42 IRE for middle gray (which is "proper" exposure as per what VLOG-L was designed for) that would put the darkest skin tones down around 42 IRE, and the fairest/brightest peak skin tones at no higher than 55 IRE, for example. You wouldn't expose skin at 60 IRE in VLOG-L, because white is rendered at 61 IRE! That's why I say VLOG-L is very different from other LOG curves, and rules that work with other LOG systems are not properly applicable to VLOG-L.
    Last edited by Barry_Green; 04-14-2017 at 09:54 PM.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Bern Caughey View Post
    Pushed Panasonic to add False Color to the GH5, even if it meant getting rid of Waveform, &/or Vectorscope. Would have made determining the proper exposure for V-Log, or Rec. 709, so much quicker, & more intuitive.

    When I work with Log C, or SLog, I'll look at the waveform if there's time, but live by False Color.
    Amen to that!


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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry_Green View Post
    Just as a point of reference, VLOG-L is not like Canon's or Sony's log curves, and should not be exposed as such. What may work for other curves such as Canon Log 2, won't work properly with VLOG-L, because the split between over & under is radically different on VLOG-L as vs. other gammas. Using the basis of 42 IRE for middle gray (which is "proper" exposure as per what VLOG-L was designed for) that would put the darkest skin tones down around 42 IRE, and the fairest/brightest peak skin tones at no higher than 55 IRE, for example. You wouldn't expose skin at 60 IRE in VLOG-L, because white is rendered at 61 IRE! That's why I say VLOG-L is very different from other LOG curves, and rules that work with other LOG systems are not properly applicable to VLOG-L.
    This is a quick DVX200 VLOG-L test using Barry’s exposure suggestions and the Varicam LUT. https://vimeo.com/208667381


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    I don't have V-LOG L for the GH5, but I did extensive testing on the GH4. The overexpose advice makes no sense unless your thing is the milky-shadow hipstermatic "film" look. The curve is already biased towards the shadows, and guess what, we don't watch shadows.

    Exposing properly – or -1 stop for situations requiring extra highlight protection – is the way to go for overall best possible PQ. If your number one concern is shadow noise, this is the wrong profile on the wrong camera.


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