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    #11
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    "Siempre Natural". Featuring "aqua frescas" and "sopa de fideo". And I suppose you classify that as "Southern cuisine"?

    Props to your use of a large bounce as well as the use of the scrim on the windows. And it is also nice to see someone still using tungsten. Many today would have shot this using LED's and for not much reason beyond convenience. And it likely would have suffered as a result. Nothing wrong with a good old tungsten package.
    Big sources matter.


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    #12
    Senior Member JRJphoto's Avatar
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    That ain't southern. That there is Mexican. Northern Mexican. Northern hippy Mexican! And it's tasty, too. But, I'm a steak and lobster kinda guy.

    I agree about the "convenience" of LED. There's nothing convenient about a little source of light you can't shape, renders skintones terribly, has a weak punch and a short throw. MCU interviews. That's all LED's are really good for right now. I missed my old tungstens. This was a tungsten shoot. If I could have had two 18k HMI's punching daylight into the set all day, that would'a been nice, too. lol
    Jason R. Johnston
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    #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRJphoto View Post
    That ain't southern. That there is Mexican. Northern Mexican. Northern hippy Mexican! And it's tasty, too. But, I'm a steak and lobster kinda guy.

    I agree about the "convenience" of LED. There's nothing convenient about a little source of light you can't shape, renders skintones terribly, has a weak punch and a short throw. MCU interviews. That's all LED's are really good for right now. I missed my old tungstens. This was a tungsten shoot. If I could have had two 18k HMI's punching daylight into the set all day, that would'a been nice, too. lol
    They keep improving LEDs - wonder when they will make a kit that does everything tungsten could do. I am testing LEDs and trying to work with them. I like the low heat and low wattage use. I think LEDs in some form will be the future. Two 18k HMI's? That is some power and a hefty budget. HMI's are expensive but nice! I imagine if you use them you would rent them.

    I could appreciate a lobster right now. It would be a thousand times better than my homemade chili.


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    #14
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    "That's all LED's are really good for right now."

    I am ready to declare that no longer the case. On a recent shoot I used some LED's that were custom made by the Gaffer on a feature film and they were a world apart from the cheap 1x1 led's. For one thing, they were roughly 3 ft x 1 ft in size. And the color output was wonderful. I used one of them as a key light, putting it through a 4 x 4 artificial silk.

    One cannot buy these exact units since they are custom made, but they were roughly the same as the Kino select LED's. They had a honeycomb grid over a diffuser, a diffuser that rendered the source as one continuous, smooth source. No indication whatsoever that it was comprised of multiple emitters. The output was similar to the of the LiteMat brand soft LED's. I mixed the units with tungsten fresnels and the two source types were bang on identical to my eye and to the camera sensor.

    I'm sold. My next lighting purchase will be either the Kino select 30 or a LiteMat 4 S2.
    Big sources matter.


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    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPNola View Post
    "That's all LED's are really good for right now."

    I am ready to declare that no longer the case. On a recent shoot I used some LED's that were custom made by the Gaffer on a feature film and they were a world apart from the cheap 1x1 led's. For one thing, they were roughly 3 ft x 1 ft in size. And the color output was wonderful. I used one of them as a key light, putting it through a 4 x 4 artificial silk.

    One cannot buy these exact units since they are custom made, but they were roughly the same as the Kino select LED's. They had a honeycomb grid over a diffuser, a diffuser that rendered the source as one continuous, smooth source. No indication whatsoever that it was comprised of multiple emitters. The output was similar to the of the LiteMat brand soft LED's. I mixed the units with tungsten fresnels and the two source types were bang on identical to my eye and to the camera sensor.

    I'm sold. My next lighting purchase will be either the Kino select 30 or a LiteMat 4 S2.
    It also depends on what type of shooting you are doing. The LEDs work best for flat illumination. But with effort, I am sure they can be adapted to any type of lighting situation. I know Jason also does cinema work and I do not think LEDs are being used much for that type of work.

    I am in the process of testing and using them and it does take some time to adapt. I am also trying to customize them. The flat panels do not allow you to easily direct a light.

    Because they are new, it seems you do not have the options you have with traditional lighting. For example, does anyone make a source 4 light in LED?

    The bottom line is that LEDs or some other technical breakthrough will be the future. Just like digital took over analog and even film.


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    #16
    Senior Member JRJphoto's Avatar
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    Kinos and LEDs work about the same, photometrically. They simply do not have the throw of the big hot units. However, I love LEDs because you can get them inches from talent and they'll never break a sweat or be in any sort of heat-related danger. Hand-holding a 650/1k light source punching through artificial silk a foot away from talent with that gorgeous wrap around...with the proper units you getwhatever color temp you want accurately. It's very nice. And you don't need a genny. So sound loves you, too. It's exciting, but until they can get LEDs to throw with the same punch as the big 18k hotheads, I'll keep only mildly impressed lol Cost is also a factor. But LEDs sure have come a helluva long way. And they don't break like kinos.
    Jason R. Johnston
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    #17
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    Some other nice features of LED lights is the heat factor in hot weather. In South FL during the summer it gets hot. When shooting indoors, I turn the AC off to avoid noise. That alone causes an escalation in heat, but when you start cranking up the wattage with multiple lights, it get hot in the room really fast. Your subjects sweating and feeling uncomfortable is not good. Also I have never burned my hand on an LED.

    I like to shoot with at least 3 to 6 lights, and sometimes more. Many of my lights are older and mismatched, meaning they require different bulbs. It is a real pain keeping them fed with fresh bulbs. LEDs do not burn out (they can last a long time). (also the color temperature change as bulbs heat up - does not happen with LEDs).

    Another advantage to LEDs is that smaller units can be battery operated and do not require being plugged in. Even some of the larger off camera setup can be battery operated. That is nice if you are shooting a moving subject. With a battery operated light, you can actually put it on a boom pole and have someone follow the subject. Nice. So I am experimenting and slowly transitioning to LED as much as possible. (Note, everything I do seems to be slow.)


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    #18
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    Not sure how evolved into LED lighting. Did the commercial air yet?


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    #19
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    We are still in post production. Client loves them so far, but we're having to make changes. 4 spots done so far: 2x 30s and 2x 15s in English and Spanish. We will cut together a second set soon with the agency. Once everything is approved I will put the spots through a noise reduction process and then spit out the masters for the stations. Then I'll post the finished spots. Maybe next week or so?

    Saturday I am DP-ing a 24 hour film race with the guy who directed Ingress which i shot 2014/2015. I plan to use my DVX200.
    Jason R. Johnston
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    #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRJphoto View Post
    We are still in post production. Client loves them so far, but we're having to make changes. 4 spots done so far: 2x 30s and 2x 15s in English and Spanish. We will cut together a second set soon with the agency. Once everything is approved I will put the spots through a noise reduction process and then spit out the masters for the stations. Then I'll post the finished spots. Maybe next week or so?

    Saturday I am DP-ing a 24 hour film race with the guy who directed Ingress which i shot 2014/2015. I plan to use my DVX200.
    Sounds like the production went well and the scope of the commercials coverage is deeper than I thought.

    The race sounds great - people need to see what DVX can do. Too many people claiming green spots and ghosts - it is always good to see what the camera can do in the hands of a pro.


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