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    How to recreate a window with condensation?
    #1
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    Hello! I am going to shoot a short film, and in a scene a person paints on a condensated window with her finger (in order to look out). The scene will be shot in a hot/tempered climate but we want to imitate the effect as if the day outside were cold.
    How can we believably recreate condensation inside of a normal window - and without the camera being condensated?
    The solutions that came to my mind were:

    a) Somehow cooling down the glass
    b) Cook water in the room and let the steam fill the air (but the glass of the lens would also be condensated)
    c) Use some kind of spray

    Does anybody have a solution to this?


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    #2
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    If it's already a humid location try cooling the glass with a co2 fire extiguisher


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    #3
    Senior Member JPNola's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by orange View Post
    Hello! I am going to shoot a short film, and in a scene a person paints on a condensated window with her finger (in order to look out). The scene will be shot in a hot/tempered climate but we want to imitate the effect as if the day outside were cold.
    How can we believably recreate condensation inside of a normal window - and without the camera being condensated?
    The solutions that came to my mind were:

    a) Somehow cooling down the glass
    b) Cook water in the room and let the steam fill the air (but the glass of the lens would also be condensated)
    c) Use some kind of spray

    Does anybody have a solution to this?

    I would think a basic home humidifier unit would work.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/1422204...&ul_noapp=true

    $_58.JPG
    Big sources matter.


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    #4
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    If the glass is not cold the humidity in the air from the humidifier or boiling water will not condense on the glass.

    You HAVE to get the glass cold if you are going to use real condensation. In a hot, arid climate that can be difficult.


    You can buy "haze" in a spray can. Film Riot covered it in a couple of their videos. Perhaps you can spray that right onto the window and whatever it is that makes the haze will build up on the window in such a way as to look like condensation? You would not have to worry about temperature then, and that would be easier.

    You could also try a number of aerosol products. Maybe even air freshener.


    Steve


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    #5
    Senior Member Capt Quirk's Avatar
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    It could be done in post, not quick and easy, but maybe easier than trying to shoot a practical effect over and over, until you get it right or give up.


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    #6
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    Use an Evian mister...it will allow take after take...of course you'd have to test first...cosmetic stores will usually carry some...link below:

    https://www.amazon.com/evian-Evian-Spray/dp/B000F99JUS


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    #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by orange View Post
    Hello! I am going to shoot a short film, and in a scene a person paints on a condensated window with her finger (in order to look out). The scene will be shot in a hot/tempered climate but we want to imitate the effect as if the day outside were cold.
    How can we believably recreate condensation inside of a normal window - and without the camera being condensated?
    Water vapor condenses out onto a surface when the surface temperature is below the ambient dew point. So... your window has to be colder than the dew point for the air in the room. In a hot dry climate that may be hard to accomplish. In a hot humid climate, it should be fairly easy.

    Easiest thing to do probably is to cut a piece of acrylic (or glass if you really want it) picture frame glazing to the size of your window, put it in the 'fridge over night. Assuming that your dew point is higher than your 'fridge temp, which is typically around 3C. A dew point higher than 10C will do I suspect. When you need it, take it out and place it in the frame almost touching the real window. Watch condensation occur, shot when you've got what you need. Several pieces in the 'fridge would let you make several takes.

    Also, handle the new "glass" by the edges (and be quick about it) as your finger tips will warm the glass and may prevent condensation leaving finger marks.


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