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    #11
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    If money is of concern, don't buy cheap LED's, because they more than likely SUCK. If you're shooting PEOPLE, then the most important thing is SKIN TONES. Look at used tungsten or if you want new, Lowel. I'd say MANY of us started out buying a Lowel light kit. 20 years in and I still have some Lowels just to shoot through Chimeras.

    LED's have lots of advantages and are "sexy and cool", but they still don't render skin tones as good as tungsten. I still light a LOT with tungsten.

    Regarding fluorescents, don't bother unless you're getting a SCREAMING deal on some used stuff and all you're worried about is providing "illumination" and not really "lighting". I've been trying to get away from Kino's for a while and finally did at the end of '16. Pulled them out of the truck and don't plan on ever putting them back in. Like one of my guys says, "The only reason to use fluorescents is if you don't care about skin tones".


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    #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by puredrifting View Post
    ...Those things we were talking about like falloff, microshadows, color accuracy really cannot be divined from a spec sheet, you need to get your hands on them and try it, with your cameras, in your situations...
    Yeah, it's kind of like trying to evaluate a lens or a camera based solely on video on the internet. You do not necessarily know the situation/circumstance of the shoot or how much post may have been done that affects the final image that may have improved or degraded it.


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    #13
    Senior Member jagraphics's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Run&Gun View Post
    LED's have lots of advantages and are "sexy and cool", but they still don't render skin tones as good as tungsten. I still light a LOT with tungsten.
    .
    Tungston isn't an option. Having just got back from the castle the interior is 15th Century full of tapestries and paintings. I can use tungsten on other shoots but this one will have to be cool lighting.
    It will be a preference for other shoots too.

    LEDS have the advantage in that they tend to be a LOT lighter, smaller and easier to move around with. The cool running is also a plus as is the low power requirement.

    So what non-tungsten do you suggest for interviews?


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    #14
    Senior Member jagraphics's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by puredrifting View Post
    I've been in several of those castles and yes, I agree, I would not have hot lights anywhere near those ancient tapestries, linens or paintings. At this point, I think you should rent a proper kit, there is little incentive to buy unless you know exactly what you want/need. Why not rent for a couple of shoots and try LED, then fluorescents? Look at your video you light with the rental units and see of they are hitting the mark for what you need and most importantly, for what your clients expect. Lighting is definitely one of those things you should try before you buy, if possible. Those things we were talking about like falloff, microshadows, color accuracy really cannot be divined from a spec sheet, you need to get your hands on them and try it, with your cameras, in your situations. I would rent.

    Fortunately tomorrow I am at http://https://www.photographyshow.com and hope to find some answers. (now very DLSR user is a cinematographer continuous lights, as opposed to flash, are back in vogue) Though of course *every* salesman with a lighting kit will tell me why his are the best and only option for my needs :-)

    So in 24 hours time I will probably be back on here asking opinions on the options I have been given.


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    #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jagraphics View Post
    Tungston isn't an option. Having just got back from the castle the interior is 15th Century full of tapestries and paintings. I can use tungsten on other shoots but this one will have to be cool lighting.
    It will be a preference for other shoots too.

    LEDS have the advantage in that they tend to be a LOT lighter, smaller and easier to move around with. The cool running is also a plus as is the low power requirement.

    So what non-tungsten do you suggest for interviews?
    I understand about not wanting to get a hot instrument close to something flammable, priceless and irreplaceable. I also imagine power may be of concern in an environment like a 600-700 year old castle, so being able to battery power your lights can really come in handy.

    If you're comparing like output/type/photometrics, LED fixtures may actually be heavier and bigger compared to their conventional counterparts(especially if you venture into HMI territory).

    The LED's that I use aren't inexpensive, but the light quality, which is the important part to me, is there. I own four Astra full power, bi-color units all with Chimeras and a "flight kit" of three Sola ENG daylight fresnels. You can actually do a lot with two Astra's and three Sola's. I have lit feature sit-downs with that with good results.


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    #16
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    Get an aputure light storm then diffuse however you like.


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    #17
    Senior Member jagraphics's Avatar
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    Having done the photography show and asked around this set https://www.rotolight.com/product/neo-3-light-kit/
    seems to be a good option. There are positive reviews from ENG and people who do interviews. I am not looking for cinema graphic lighting.

    Build quality is good and the company is about 100 miles from me in the UK... (actually based in Pinewood)

    Does anyone have any experience with these lights in use ?


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    #18
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jagraphics View Post
    Having done the photography show and asked around this set https://www.rotolight.com/product/neo-3-light-kit/
    seems to be a good option. There are positive reviews from ENG and people who do interviews. I am not looking for cinema graphic lighting.

    Build quality is good and the company is about 100 miles from me in the UK... (actually based in Pinewood)

    Does anyone have any experience with these lights in use ?
    I reviewed the Anova Pro lights for a recent article. Good stuff but the light they sent me was $2,200.00 for a single light, probably more pricey than a lot of people can spend these days. From what I experienced, the quality was very good, I would buy one if they were in my price range.
    Always spending money on more gear! It's a sickness.


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    #19
    Senior Member jagraphics's Avatar
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    They do seem reasonable quality. The lights I am looking at are the smaller versions. Good for fill lights on interviews and small sets.
    Also I spoke to the people who design and make them and can get to the factory if there is a problem.

    More to the point most of their kit seems to be aimed at the serious professional market. Not surprising as the are based in Pinewood at the studios.

    I think I will take a chance on them.


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    #20
    Senior Member puredrifting's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jagraphics View Post
    They do seem reasonable quality. The lights I am looking at are the smaller versions. Good for fill lights on interviews and small sets.
    Also I spoke to the people who design and make them and can get to the factory if there is a problem.

    More to the point most of their kit seems to be aimed at the serious professional market. Not surprising as the are based in Pinewood at the studios.

    I think I will take a chance on them.
    Generally, I think they make decent gear. Please report back with an update once you have used them on a few shoots, it would be nice to hear how they work for you. They are leagues better than the kit you posted to you in your original post.
    Always spending money on more gear! It's a sickness.


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