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    #11
    Senior Member
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    Feb 2009
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    Long Island
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP View Post
    I've seen this come up in different forums. My answer is always the same, and honestly what I think is the best form of preventative medicine.

    Join a gym. Learn to do squats and deadlifts. Get strong at them, and these problems will largely go away.
    Great real world advice.

    But just a note that squats and deadlifts are the two worst exercises that anyone can do with bad knees or a bad back...and the reason for that is because they are the two best exercises in the world to build strength. And the bench press. They call them the "Big 3" and they work dozens of muscles in your body that you didn't even know you had. Go for a run too.

    Getting stronger and faster is amazing for the brain.


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    #12
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    Jul 2013
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    There's strength, and there's flexibility, and of course stamina. These have all been covered by others in this thread, but the last and in my opinion the most important piece is use. How you use your body. In the dance, music, and theatre world this is addressed often times through something like Alexander technique. There are other techniques and ways to deal with it too (Gokhale Method, Feldenkrais, etc), but the types of unhealthy subtle patterns of tension that we all develop to varying degrees need to be reprogrammed if you are going to do anything even mildly repetitive and/or prolonged without injuring yourself.

    Ergonomics/placement is important too of course, but even with ideal placement you can injure yourself if you hold tension in unhealthy ways. Doing squats can or anything else that demanding will also lead to an injury if done incorrectly, but those activities are so obviously demanding, that we tend to be more careful how we execute them. However, we don't notice the unconscious ways that we hold tension when doing mundane daily activities. These too need to be trained.

    Anyway, my two cents. I got into this stuff mostly in my other work which is orchestra conductor and classical guitarist.


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