Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19
  1. Collapse Details
    #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    793
    Default
    Great job Doug!
    Just purchased the rental!
    I have those exact eyeglass frames!

    Tom


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,152
    Default
    Thanks, Tom. I appreciate the support and I hope it really helps you get a boost selling stock footage. I sold $315 just at Shutterstock alone today. $1869 for the month so far and we still have 12 days to go. I just uploaded a 124 new clips this afternoon to keep priming the pump!

    BTW, if you pay close attention during the training video I think I actually wear 3 different pairs of glasses. :-)


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    793
    Default
    I'm sure it will give me a boost, it's very helpful. I got a kick out of the table of contents that scrolled precisely as the altitude of the tiny Space-X rocket to its right. That was a nice touch!


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #14
    Senior Member Jim Arthurs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    835
    Default
    So 21 years ago I saw the need for sky time-lapse for my own projects and spent a summer & fall shooting 35mm with my old Wall camera... I shot every sunrise, thunder storm and sunset I could manage. I soon realized it was fairly unique and perhaps useful to others, so I burned .jpg sequences (film to D1 transfers) and had a CD mastered, duplicated, and art made and self-sold a stock footage album called "Colorado Altitudes". Side note... at the time After Effects could not actually USE .jpg image sequences native without a plugin! I took out ads in the popular videography mags at the time, sold a couple hundred copies in total and had a blast. "Customers, not Clients" was my motto for a while. Spring comes and I get a cold call from Adobe... they'd like to buy the footage. Holy Cr#p! Got a good deal arranged, lots of cash, re-encoded to QT PhotoJPG and they sold them under their Image Club Graphics label. That cloud footage of mine was EVERYWHERE: TNT promos, NBC promos, concerts and tons of awards shows and event broadcasts. Eyewire was the re-brand of Adobe Image Club Graphics and handled a new title I produced. Later did the same approach with more clouds, time-lapse traffic and a storm title for a UK company called Digital Vision. Ultimately that footage wound up at Getty and I got royalties for years until SD footage was no longer viable. I was too busy with animation at the time to pursue this any further, though I did shoot a big NYC time-lapse title just before 9-11.

    JimA_stock_collections_02.jpg JimA_stock_collections_01.jpg

    I'm sure it's a vastly different experience now. At the time, royalty-free footage was rather novel and rare with very limited markets who were EXTREMELY selective and picky. I used to joke to people that it was a very easy process as long as you had a fully loaded 35mm camera in the car and was at the right place at the right time. Now that IMAX rez time-lapse with a 600 dollar Canon DSLR is super easy, I no longer care that much about shooting it. I would often shoot for two or three weeks before getting a 200' can processed and transferred to tape and then again to digital files. You had to be spot on with your exposures. Sometimes the time-lapse motor on the camera would misfire and take two pictures, or stall out and over-expose a frame. Then in post you'd have to dust-bust every single frame of every shot, because every darn frame would have some dust hit or other issue.

    There are two types of stock producers; those people who have a history of footage from jobs going back years or decades, and those who produce just for a title or theme. I have a younger friend who keeps expressing the desire to sell stock time-lapse. Yet even with every moco slider on the market in his possession he hasn't actually shot more than a small handful of shots ever, even though his base tool-set is light years more comprehensive than what I had at the time. So part of it is just having a burning desire to shoot, and the wash/rise/repeat tenacity of doing it over and over. The other part is finding a theme or concept and deep diving into that one subject more than anyone else has.

    Regards,
    Jim Arthurs


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    793
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Arthurs View Post
    There are two types of stock producers; those people who have a history of footage from jobs going back years or decades, and those who produce just for a title or theme.
    Very cool Jim. Doug prefaces every chapter with a quote such as yours. Must be something to it!


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,152
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Arthurs View Post
    I So part of it is just having a burning desire to shoot, and the wash/rise/repeat tenacity of doing it over and over. The other part is finding a theme or concept and deep diving into that one subject more than anyone else has.
    Regards,
    You are absolutely right on both points. I am like a farmer planting seeds. Does anyone pay me to plant my seeds? No. Is it work? Yes. And that is enough to keep a lot of people on the couch or working for a safe reliable paycheck. I've learned that some people simply aren't self-starters and can't do stock footage -- and that's okay. Different types of personalities. That's why there are freelancers and staff shooters, and some people will only succeed at one or the other. Stock footage is like that. You have to think of yourself as a freelancer shooting for clients that you will never meet.

    In my training video I talk about "finding your niche". Yes, it will help your success to dive into subject matter that interests you or that you have special access to or knowledge of that others don't. Everyone has those things around them if they stop and think about it.

    Great story on the Adobe Image Library. That is amazing packaging, can you imagine anyone producing something like that today? Times have sure changed. I remember buying CDs loaded with background graphics and clip art from Art Beats.


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,152
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Roper View Post
    I'm sure it will give me a boost, it's very helpful. I got a kick out of the table of contents that scrolled precisely as the altitude of the tiny Space-X rocket to its right. That was a nice touch!
    I'm glad you liked that. A perfect example of making lemonade from lemons. I was shooting a rocket launch with three cameras and that one was just locked down on a wide shot. I'd never shot from that location before and somehow I miscalculated where the rocket was going to rise over the trees. But you know what, if the rocket had risen through the middle of the frame, what would anyone do with it? But framed to the side like that I think it will make a cool background image for text or graphics in a science or technology video. Hasn't sold yet, but it's only been online for a few weeks. So I decided to use it myself.


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #18
    Senior Member Jim Arthurs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    835
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Jensen View Post
    That is amazing packaging, can you imagine anyone producing something like that today? Times have sure changed. I remember buying CDs loaded with background graphics and clip art from Art Beats.
    Funny story about the packaging... just after I had finished the Adobe re-encoding and it was for sale from them, one of the "trendy & hip" local production houses I had a relationship with was interested in some time-lapse cloud footage. I offered to GIVE them the EXACT SAME CLIPS that I had just prepared for Adobe, just hand burned onto blank ugly CD's when one of their producers called me to say rather smugly they had just bought a collection that they "Liked a whole lot better" than mine. Of course they had just spend $499.00 on the very same clouds, but in a pretty box from Adobe.

    At the time there was only Art Beats by Phil Bates and that Prairie Stock company offering "moving" stock and companies like Getty and Adobe wanted in on that. There was also a small VFX library of smoke and pyro you could buy on CD. Not long after I started self-publishing (I had a credit card reader before I actually had a personal credit card!) I got contacted by Art Beats about adding my footage to their growing library. Who knows what would have happened if I had, but I would have missed the approaching cash rocket that was Adobe and the relationships that developed from that.

    Today my young friend sees the current stock footage market as "easy money" without any research into the work required. He actually thinks that a valid approach would be to shoot stock while on vacation trips with his wife, catching odd moments to grab footage. Of course I tried to explain that shooting in mid-day sun at chest level pointing at something everyone had shot a million times before would not distinguish him in the market, and that he'd actually have to think of the process as a job that required planning and some sort of serious time commitment with early mornings and late evenings, all in addition to polishing his framing and story-telling skills. The next time he brings this up, I'll send him the link to buy your course.
    Jim Arthurs


    1 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    2,152
    Default
    Thanks. At least you can rest assured he will basically get the same lecture from me that you have already given him.

    BTW, I still get the occassional royalty payment from Art Beats for stuff I provided to them maybe 10 years ago.


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •