Page 1 of 9 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 88
  1. Collapse Details
    Logarist Color Correction for DaVinci Resolve, Vegas Pro, Final Cut Pro X
    #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    177
    Default
    Logarist now supports Adobe Premiere Pro and Premiere Elements with a free plugin.

    Logarist brings color science to the art of color correction, enabling fast and accurate adjustment right inside your video editing application, without the need to shoot raw. Logarist reduces color correction to its fundamentals, with controls that work much like the controls built into a camera or a raw image processor like Lightroom. Logarist uses look-up tables (LUTs) to transform your camera's video into a color space optimized for exposure compensation, white balance correction, and contrast adjustment, and then renders it for viewing on a standard display. Logarist makes basic color correction easy and accurate, and enables advanced corrections that are otherwise difficult or impossible. Logarist is free, and you can download it from logarist.com.

    Supported camera color spaces:
    • BT.709 (standard HD video)
    • Arri Alexa Log C
    • Canon EOS Neutral
    • Canon Log 13
    • Fujifilm F-Log
    • GoPro Protune
    • JVC J-Log1
    • Panasonic GH2 Standard
    • Panasonic GH4 Cinelike D
    • Panasonic GH4 V-Log L
    • Panasonic GH5 Cinelike D
    • Panasonic VariCam V-Log
    • Sony Cine12
    • Sony HyperGamma 2, 4, 7, and 8
    • Sony S-Log13



    Last edited by balazer; 08-05-2017 at 03:30 PM.


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    418
    Default
    Thank you.


    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    787
    Default
    I have to admit that I don't quite understand how a 3D LUT can change the working color space of an application? For example, I think FCPX processes everything internally as YUV with 16 bit precision, right?


    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    5,873
    Default
    Lots of interesting info on the Logarist system in the Personal View.com Logarist thread.


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    177
    Default
    Hi, joe12south. RGB and YUV are pixel formats, not color spaces exactly. I couldn't find any definitive info from Apple about the pixel format used by FCPX, but from my testing (at least with the Color Correction effect) it's using a high precision RGB pixel format, probably 32-bit floating point RGB.

    Logarist isn't changing the pixel format. The pixel format is determined by the video app, and sometimes by the plugins you're using. The Logarist LUTs do color space transformation and display rendering. A LUT is just a way of encoding an arbitrary three-dimensional transformation, so it can be used to change colors or the color space. To the video app, it's all just numbers. The numbers only become colors when you assign a color space, which establishes the relationship between the colors and the numbers.


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Panama
    Posts
    512
    Default
    Thanks for sharing.
    What about the Panasonic DVX200 with Scene 4 (i.e. natural)? What color space should be used?


    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    177
    Default
    Hi, diegocervo. I don't have a transform specifically for the Panasonic DVX200. I'd suggest using a custom scene with Gamma set to HD, Matrix set to Norm1, and Knee turned Off. That *should* correspond to BT.709, though it's anyone's guess what Panasonic has really done there. Then use the BT.709 to Logarist input transform. If you shoot in BT.709 with a normal exposure you may find that highlights are clipped too low, so you may want to underexpose by half a stop to a stop to extend your highlight range, and then compensate in Logarist. I would guess that Cinelike D on this camera does not match Cinelike D on the GH4. And I recommend against using V-Log L in 8-bit recordings.

    Try it and let us know how it works.


    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    598
    Default
    Please forgive a layman question, but how is it different from grading with regular LUT's and tools available within each of the color grading programs?


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    787
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by balazer View Post
    Hi, joe12south. RGB and YUV are pixel formats, not color spaces exactly. I couldn't find any definitive info from Apple about the pixel format used by FCPX, but from my testing (at least with the Color Correction effect) it's using a high precision RGB pixel format, probably 32-bit floating point RGB.

    Logarist isn't changing the pixel format. The pixel format is determined by the video app, and sometimes by the plugins you're using. The Logarist LUTs do color space transformation and display rendering. A LUT is just a way of encoding an arbitrary three-dimensional transformation, so it can be used to change colors or the color space. To the video app, it's all just numbers. The numbers only become colors when you assign a color space, which establishes the relationship between the colors and the numbers.
    Sorry, I should have said "color model."
    So, I understand the benefit of being able to do transforms with more precision, or inside of a bigger gamut. I also understand how certain models allow for certain types of transformations that would be difficult or impossible in a different model. What I don't understand is what benefit is gained from going in and out of your LUT transformations?

    I've got a bunch of questions:

    - The NLE is working at high precision (at least 16bit) and a "wide" internal gamut. How do these LUT's make doing transforms "better"?
    - If what you're doing is transforming to a different color space, then isn't knowing the input camera's color space important? For example, the GH4 can use either sRGB or aRGB. Picture profile settings like saturation don't change the color space...why does the latter matter but not the former?
    - How is this easier? It's a minimum of 2 extra steps in FCPX for every single clip. For what gain?
    - I don't understand how this would help rescue white balance any better than you can without it? Certainly not like Lightroom (or Premiere for that matter) does with a RAW file. The color error is baked into the non-raw file, and is going to be destructive no matter what.
    - How is this different than the standardized LOG LUT's you released earlier?

    Sorry if I sound skeptical, but the language around this "LUT system" is very opaque, and we've all been bitten by LUT's that promise to be miracle cures. I'm sincerely trying to understand why it's worth the extra work. If there are real, meaningful benefits, it would be great to know how to capitalize on them.


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    5,873
    Cool
    Quote Originally Posted by joe12south View Post
    Sorry if I sound skeptical, but the language around this "LUT system" is very opaque, and we've all been bitten by LUT's that promise to be miracle cures.
    "The proof is in the pudding"

    It's free, so I would try it out and see what you think of it after using it.

    I was not expecting much from this, but then I tried it with a few different 8-bit cameras ( and one 10-bit camera ) and was quite surprised at how good the default color was and how much more I could modify my footage before it fell apart.

    Since I mainly edit with MAGIX Vegas Pro 14, I can apply the Logarist controls to any clip in two mouse clicks, or apply it to an entire track in two mouse clicks.

    It took me about 5 minutes to install and set up Logarist default settings in Vegas Pro.


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 1 of 9 12345 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •