Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. Collapse Details
    vincent laforet says his best lens is 24mm like kubrick but he uses ff
    #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    532
    Default
    Hi,
    http://blog.vincentlaforet.com/mygear/recommended-kit/

    On this blog, vincent laforet says his favorite focal lenght is the 24mm just like stanley kubrick.

    But stanley kubrick uses a sensor similar to 1.6x crop sensor and laforet uses full frame, so it doesnt give the same field of view at all.

    If i am on my crop sensor 1.6x, does Laforet means his favorite lens is the 15mm or the 24mm ?

    Thanks in advance for any comments,
    have a good day,
    Deleuze3


    Reply With Quote
     

  2. Collapse Details
    #2
    Senior Member David W. Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    La Petite Roche
    Posts
    6,721
    Default
    The best advice I can give without coming off as a condescending ass would be..... Forget about what somebody else's favorite focal length lens is. If you feel the need to have a favorite, then choose one based on your needs. Not somebody else's.

    All the best!

    Dave


    5 out of 6 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  3. Collapse Details
    #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    5,751
    Default
    I believe Lubezki shot the "Revenant" mostly on 24mm (or its equivalents, since there were two primary cameras there - Alexa and Alexa65).


    0 out of 1 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  4. Collapse Details
    #4
    Senior Member JackCarter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    401
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by deleuze3 View Post
    On this blog, vincent laforet says his favorite focal lenght is the 24mm just like stanley kubrick.
    From my research Kubricks's favourite focal length was 18mm. Most of Eyes Wide Shut was with an 18mm Zeiss Super Speed. From what I've read Terrance Malik shot most of the Tree of Life with an 18mm Ultra Prime also.
    SONY F3 / F5 / FS700 / Odyssey 7Q+ / a6300 / Zeiss CP.2 & Sigma lenses


    Reply With Quote
     

  5. Collapse Details
    #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bristol, UK
    Posts
    9,438
    Default
    His favourite is a the fov of a 15 with the dof character of a 24.

    aka a really fast 15

    to get the look of a 24/2 fulframe your best affordable option is probably a voigtlander 17 0.95 - if they cover s35 - I can't remember.


    Reply With Quote
     

  6. Collapse Details
    #6
    Mod v2.0 Noel Evans's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    10,864
    Default
    1st point - Stanley Kubrick would not give a rats ass what crop factor is. Crop factor is only relevant as compared to what something else is. If he likes 24mm, again, he's not comparing to FF. He likes 24mm.

    On S35 a 50mm is a 50mm and that's how we work. I never think oh, what would be the equivalent in ff because I don't care. Im used to S35 and 50mm is 50mm.

    2nd Point - I agree with David, what do you like? Thats part of your visual style.

    My favourite lens is 35mm. I love using it for medium wide shots, which means you have to have some room to back up, but I love the way it looks.
    w: Noel Evans TV

    e: noel@noelevans.tv
    p: +61 (0) 408 455 374


    1 out of 3 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  7. Collapse Details
    #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,542
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by Noel Evans View Post
    1st point - Stanley Kubrick would not give a rats ass what crop factor is. Crop factor is only relevant as compared to what something else is. If he likes 24mm, again, he's not comparing to FF. He likes 24mm.

    On S35 a 50mm is a 50mm and that's how we work. I never think oh, what would be the equivalent in ff because I don't care. Im used to S35 and 50mm is 50mm.
    I've been saying this forever! Anyone ever worked as an AC? I have.
    And trust me, the DP doesn't ask you to "Put the lens on the camera that would
    be the equivalent of a 50mm in full frame." He says "put the 35mm on the camera"
    if that's what he wants. There is NONE of this 'crop conversion' nonsense on any job
    I have ever worked in.


    1 out of 3 members found this post helpful.
    Reply With Quote
     

  8. Collapse Details
    #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    323
    Default
    When you start a project you can do tests on the main cast to see what focal length looks best on them. That's what I did with my new web series. One girl looked best at 29mm, the other at 40mm. Cinematographers do this on every project and take test shots of the actors.


    Reply With Quote
     

  9. Collapse Details
    #9
    Senior Member abreu-canedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    679
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by deleuze3 View Post
    Hi,
    http://blog.vincentlaforet.com/mygear/recommended-kit/

    On this blog, vincent laforet says his favorite focal lenght is the 24mm just like stanley kubrick.

    But stanley kubrick uses a sensor similar to 1.6x crop sensor and laforet uses full frame, so it doesnt give the same field of view at all.

    If i am on my crop sensor 1.6x, does Laforet means his favorite lens is the 15mm or the 24mm ?

    Thanks in advance for any comments,
    have a good day,
    Deleuze3
    He is asking a genuine question. Lots of folks coming from DSLR will want to know this.

    Other posts are correct in that the language of cinema is Super 35mm and so on pro sets you will not hear this "crop factor" lingo. And calling something "full frame" is also never talked about. That is Canon marketing speech to suggest that anything smaller is "lesser than"...or not as good. So pro tip, call your full frame sized sensor "Vista Vision". ;)

    A 24mm will always be a 24mm, not matter what the sensor size. That number relates to the distance between the "nodal point" of the lens and the focal plane/sensor. So the distance of 24mm will not be changed, nor will the perspective and depth characteristics of the focal length. What will change is the "Field of View". So a 24mm on S35 will show you a similar amount of the world in front of it as a 35mm lens on a "Vista Vision" sized sensor...this is what we call a stills photography sized sensor in the cinema world. Kubrick was undoubtedly referring to S35mm sized film. So if you want the same depth and perspective qualities of the 24mm lens, just use a 24mm lens...no matter what. If you want to see as much of the world on your DSLR as Kubrick saw with a 24mm on his S35mm film camera, then use a 35mm lens. However, if you want to see as much of the world on a S35mm sensor as you do with a 24mm lens on your DSLR, then use a 15mm lens on the S35mm camera.

    Just multiply or divide by the ratio of 1.6 or 1.7...this varies marginally.

    I too love a good 24mm lens. But I've also been starting to discover the wonderful world of the 21mm lens. As it stands for me, I want to build a new lens set of 21mm, 40mm, 85/90mm, 135mm. That sounds ridiculous, I know. But the way I've been wanting to shoot lately lends itself to those focal lengths. I'm starting to prefer the 40mm to the 50mm. I'm also trying to learn more about 60mm focal length. I hear the Cooke Speed Panchros have a 60mm lens, but I hardly ever see it for rent.


    Reply With Quote
     

  10. Collapse Details
    #10
    Senior Member dp90068's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Phoenix, Az
    Posts
    203
    Default
    Quote Originally Posted by mail4joeg View Post
    When you start a project you can do tests on the main cast to see what focal length looks best on them. That's what I did with my new web series. One girl looked best at 29mm, the other at 40mm. Cinematographers do this on every project and take test shots of the actors.
    This is the best response I've read on DVXUser in quite some time and it makes absolute sense. Didn't Shane Hulbut do a comparison of focal lengths using a model to demonstrate this. Back in the studio days didn't contracts specify things like focal lengths and lighting?

    This is subtle - similar focal lengths would see long thin faces and short wide faces differently.

    Haven't thought about this in a while, Thanks joeg!
    Don Platon
    Producer | Cinematographer | Editor
    Phoenix, AZ
    DonPlaton.com
    @donplaton


    Reply With Quote
     

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •