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    #11
    Senior Member KurtF's Avatar
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    That is a sweet rig. Very useful. I have an old Olympus OM-1 I might have to convert.
    Buy a Tripod, Use the Tripod.


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    #12
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    Decided I need a few screw on ND filters for this rig, our ENG cameras are too sensitive to let this work in the best way. Had to throw in 1/16 ND in the camera body to get the iris open and I'd really rather set back focus with the clear glass in the path because you are more likely to need the critical focus indoors in poor light. I was thinking of making a dimming EL inverter, but that is more work than it's worth for this tool when I can buy some cheap ND filters to screw on the few times I need them.

    Wish our ENG cameras had a 15mm or 9mm rod mount on them, would be a lot easier to set this up. The two tripod method isn't much fun.


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    #13
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    You should make a jig for this. A tripod quick release plate for the camera that's hard mounted to a board of wood. hard mount the collimator rig to the board on a worm gear to raise/lower it. You could also add a rail to move it near/far from the camera lens. A trip to a good hardware store should get you all you need for not much money. Very basic tooling.
    Mitch Gross
    Cinema Product Manager
    Panasonic System Solutions Company


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    #14
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    Hmm, that is a good idea. I do have some old VCT plates that I could screw down to "something" and I have some extra cheap rails that I could attach at that correct height to the "something" too. Would save a ton of time each time I go through the cameras. We don't need to go through them too often, I've put tape on the adjustment ring so the students can't make the mistake of turning the FFD adjustment when they are trying to get the Macro setting. Yes that really was a huge problem. We will soon be requiring both a math and a science, hoping that elevates our average because things were a lot better back in 2003 when I started this job.

    But every now and then it needs to be checked, already found one lens that has an off center or tipped element that I really should send back to Fuji for repair. Not uncommon for the lenses to hit things like door frames (who can be bothered with putting the camera back in the case just to move it?).


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    #15
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    A trip to the basement offered up the plate to attach everything on, looks like all I need is something to bolt on that will clamp a set of rods and maybe allow them to have the height changed a little for fine tuning. This is the mount for our oldest teleprompters back from the 1980's and huge CRT's. One of those never throw away something that might be useful.

    Last edited by Greg_E; 04-13-2016 at 11:11 AM.


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    #16
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    I think the final final version, so much easier than a chart on the wall. Used an ND4 filter and that seems to be just about right for our cameras in 1280x720/59.94p mode. Had an extra plate for an old tripod, decided I might as well mount it on one once in a while. Plastic feet for bench top operation. Now the target can stay at the (close to) 15mm LWS standard height to fit on my rig and the work rig.



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    #17
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    Very cool idea.


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    #18
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    @Greg_E The email I have for you isn't working. I have an update on the 35-105 conversion. I've made some good progress.

    35-105.jpg

    fdtoef.com


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    #19
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    Nice. I'll shoot you a message. Glad the lens wasn't too damaged to make this work.

    For the rest of you, the 35-105 f3.5 is a parfocal zoom with a constant aperture, you can understand why I was interested in getting this converted. Need to pick up a 20-35 f3.5 which is also parfocal. Both lenses have a backfocus adjustment under the zoom rubber ring, google should help show the process.


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    #20
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    Kicking this back up because I just got done putting some repaired lenses back on cameras. This collimator has been one of the best "cheap" builds I've done in a while. Really makes life easy when you have a bunch of cameras to check. Also nice when setting up a speed booster. This tool let me confidently send one of the repairs back because it wasn't focusing at the right point, infinity aligned with the 10 meter mark on the barrel, and the flange focus was pretty far off to match. Fuji turned that one around in like 2 days since it was warranty and upon return it was perfect again.

    The only thing I would do differently is to try and find a light source that was less powerful. I may drop an ND gel between target and backlight one of these days. Not a big issue on cameras that have electronic ISO adjustment, but on our ENG cameras even 0db gain is too high.


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