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    #21
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    Thanks Jack...

    Too bad I don't have a Mac. Those G-film effects are awesome. Wish they made plugs for Vegas.

    I'm shooting another short this weekend, but my next film after will definitely incorporate the techniques you layed out for me. I'll try to get Barry's book and I'll look into those overlays as well.

    I would like to attempt the "money shot" on a scene this weekend, freezing on reaction shots of actors. You said it took an a minute sped to 7 seconds.... but i saw no real camera shake... were you just that steady or do you have a jib?

    Derek
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    #22
    Senior Member idvfilms's Avatar
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    Great story! this was well designed from start to finish.
    ____
    Mick


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    #23
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    Jack, sorry to bother, but I will anyway

    I couldn't find the lcd laminates on the evs website. do you know the brand name?

    thnx


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    #24
    Senior Member taubkin's Avatar
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    I know why this is so good. Sound is very cool. The music is the best I've heard and the use of sound effects throughout is very clever, like the bug that punctuates the end of the first sequence.

    (There is one bad sound, when he is taking the bandages off, that is clearly too much)

    I really loved to listen to this!


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    #25
    Senior Member Steve Strickland's Avatar
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    What an excellent film you've made here! I especially loved the "Evil Dead 2" style wire shot. Actors, cinematography, music/sound effects, and gore were spot on. I cringed when his flesh fell off and revealed the bone. Wow! Now go out and make some more films. You've got a lot of talent to put to good use.


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    #26
    Look ma no hands HorseFilms's Avatar
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    I was really impressed by this film, Jack. It was shot brilliantly and everything else just seems... well, "right," for the lack of a better term. I like that you added an extra emotional layer to this and it wasn't gore for gore's sake. Well done!


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    #27
    Still Alive Mod Jack Daniel Stanley's Avatar
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    Thanks Barry G. Your book gave me the guts to go ahead and try the Anamorphic Adaptor for the first time with this one. I laminated a 5X7 card with the auto to anamorphic conersion, tape measure settings, and exposure settings from your book and kept it in my back pocket.!!!
    Quote Originally Posted by John_Hudson
    ...wonderful attention to detail... the roach on the snadwhich...
    Thanks John. My GF wanted me to cut the roach, LOL, didn't get what it added. It was actually dead and we blew it with a can of compressed air off camera. If the dissolve were a second longer you would see it blow over on its back, but as it is, hopefully it looks like it's flying away.

    I really appreciate your detailed comments and generousity.


    Thanks Envision, Wesley, and Duffdaddy, I appreciate your comments. I worked hard on it and pats on the back are welcomed.

    Yes, Wesley the grab at 3:47 is pretty cool. No one has commented on the eye-glow of the zombie there or how I did that, maybe its obvious, but its pretty dark everywhere except for the eyes...
    Quote Originally Posted by Coffee
    Dude, I'm taking you up on your offer, we're shooting a film together! Ever been to NJ or NYC? Get ready brother, if your serious then tell wifey that it's time to pack some bags!
    Lol, we don't even know when we're going back -- til then I got a 12 hour day job. But hopefully we'll gp back soon, and if work is slow coming in Nola, WTF not? And yes I've been to NYC, lived there 95-98 before grad school and directed there last fall:
    http://live-theater.org/lbpress.html
    Anyway, I have some peeps there still and would be good to work / play there for a bit if lack of work permits.
    Quote Originally Posted by Envision
    Oh completely forgot, until seeing Wesley's comments. LOVED the 360 pan, and would really like to hear how you did it!
    the 360 degree pan technique pioneered by PK is much simpler than you would think. Basically you lock down the tripod as much as possible, try to pan at a consistent rate, make sure your actor passes in the center of the frame, and do two or three takes so you have a choice of ends and beginnings to match up. You may also move one or the other frame around and within your letterboxing / TV safe area to match them up, then a 2 to 4 frame dissolve can smooth things out when all else fails. MattinSTL actully did a really good experiment with this where he cuts it much closer than I or even PK did I think. MattinSTL PMed me a link tp his version. Maybe he'll respond to this thread again and tell us how he did his. I think he had to have masked part of the frame ... MattinSTL? At anyrate, here's th link to PK's original work, "Full Circle"
    http://www.laundryday.com/videos/full-circle/
    and thanks again PK!

    Thanks Rigby, Bischofftep, Hectorxd, and MotionCaptureMan, and thanks for commenting on the acting and storytelling, that's where my experience is (theatre) as this is only my second "real" film.

    Bischofftep, on the acting - again thanks for the comments- I'd rather ere on the side of holding a little back than going to far, especially with faicial expression. Notice I cut when the actor has his breakdown. If you do to much of this work for the audience, they wont feel anything themselves IMHO. But appreciate the comment, at least I know we didn't go to far. And I'm really glad you liked the audio. I hadn't scored film in a while and felt a bit rusty at first, but the nice thing about deadlines - makes you get past that pretty quick.

    Thanks again
    Hectorxd, as for not seeing the faces, obviously a choice and not just bad framing LOL. As the story is largely told from the perspective of Zombie Dad, I made the choice to not show the faces of the Mother and Daughter as they were lost to him, inaccessable, figments, blah blah blah. Like the adults in Charlie Brown, they were not part of his world. Sorry this didn't work for you though. Ultimately, it was good I planned it this way as I had to use two different Moms due to availability of the actor(s), LOL!
    Quote Originally Posted by panther0271
    Thanks Jack...Too bad I don't have a Mac. Those G-film effects are awesome. Wish they made plugs for Vegas.
    Somebody else makes a cool plugin set that is an alternative to MB that works for Vegas -- can somebody hook Derek up with that info? Can't remember the name of the plugins.
    Quote Originally Posted by panther0271
    I'm shooting another short this weekend, but my next film after will definitely incorporate the techniques you layed out for me. I'll try to get Barry's book and I'll look into those overlays as well.
    Barry's Book is indesipensable. And you simply can't shoot using the Anamorphic adaptor without it. -- The Broken DVD (linked in my sig) is also helpful, but they are Mac G film effects people also. As for the LCD covers ... Call EVS, I can't remember the name but I ordered them by saying ... "you know those little plastic covers vor the DVX lcd so you can frame 16X9 that they talk about on DVXuser?" they're cool like that. Also as a general rule, shop on the B&H website, put everything in you shopping basked then call EVS and order from your list. EVS website is not the greatest but the service and the people that work there are and they are familliar with much of the minutia discussed on this website.
    Quote Originally Posted by panther0271
    I would like to attempt the "money shot" on a scene this weekend, freezing on reaction shots of actors. You said it took an a minute sped to 7 seconds.... but i saw no real camera shake... were you just that steady or do you have a jib?
    Actually it was more like 30 seconds sped up to 7 seconds at variable speeds, and I use a figrig ... love it. Here's a clip of the original non CC'ed footage at original speed. Beware, watching this clip may Kill the magic as its pretty unimpressive. Thanks again Derek. I hope this is helpful.
    http://live-theater.org/realtimemoneyshot.mov
    Quote Originally Posted by Taubkin
    ...Sound is very cool. The music is the best I've heard and the use of sound effects throughout is very clever, like the bug that punctuates the end of the first sequence. (There is one bad sound, when he is taking the bandages off, that is clearly too much) I really loved to listen to this!
    Haha. Thanks for dropping by again. Yeah, the goop sounds are a little hot there, as is the finger crunch when he hits it with the hammer. I think I mixed them that hot because I wanted them to play well on even lame laptop speakers, I think I'll keep all of them but bring the mix down abit for the DVD. Q: There are three arm sounds when he unwraps: 1) the goop slithering as he unwraps, 2) the meat hitting the ground (x's 2) and 3) the soaked bandage hitting the floor -- which particularly of the three do you object to so I can consider it again? Also I think the score sort of dies folr a beat after the arm when it cuts to Mom and Daughter crying, Im thinking of adding a pedal tone (low piano note) there to button that sequence -- thoughts?
    Quote Originally Posted by Richie White
    What an excellent film you've made here! I especially loved the "Evil Dead 2" style wire shot. Actors, cinematography, music/sound effects, and gore were spot on. I cringed when his flesh fell off and revealed the bone. Wow! Now go out and make some more films. You've got a lot of talent to put to good use.
    Thanks man. I certainly hope to. I really appreciate your comments.
    Quote Originally Posted by HorseFilms
    I was really impressed by this film, Jack. It was shot brilliantly and everything else just seems... well, "right," for the lack of a better term. I like that you added an extra emotional layer to this and it wasn't gore for gore's sake. Well done!
    Thanks a lot man. I think that emotion element can make the most farfetched genres sizzle and come alive and be accessible to audiences outside of the genre -- Spiderman, the new Batman (all props to the great Tim Burton, not withstanding). The thing that's nice about more fantastical genres is that you can take a metaphor and make it real and play it out -- the last 30 years of your life happening in a day for example (could be applied to this I suppose) how much would you value the life you had and wish you had appreciated it more while it was happening -- one of the things I was looking at here.

    Thanks again everyone!
    JACKDANIELSTANLEY.COM
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    DVXUSER, TRIBECA, SLAMDANCE, SXSW, TORONTO AFTER DARK, AND MORE...


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    #28
    Sound Modulator MattinSTL's Avatar
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    Jack... since you mentioned my name in this thread I guess it's okay for me to post this, but I feel funny posting something like this on the tails of your excellent movie and this thread... but anyway, I didn't realize that somebody else had done the pan first... so I guess it's okay if I follow you're lead (after you were already influenced). They say imitation is the highest form of flattery and you're gonna' be flattered when you see a couple throwbacks to your flick in my next flick.

    When I saw the 360 pan I thought it was amazing also... just for the creative use of it combined with the knowledge to pull that out of the bag for this project. Since I've been doing video for a few years I also had a pretty good idea how it was done so I sat right down on the computer to try my hand at it. Essentially it requires a smooth pan speed and well timed, well placed blind wipes. In my little clip here there are two blind wipes which move at varying rates. Each wipe changes speed 3 times. In your NLE you can configure the speed of your wipe with a graph and line on it (at least you can in Canopus)... so it makes it much easier to get the frames in perfect sync. Sounds pretty simple, no? Now if you want to get a couple of your same actor in the same shot you'll need to use a matte... just enough to allow any overlap... the only thing that was kind of an issue for me was the shadow... but I still spaced it just at the razor's edge of needing a matte... this is the clip right HERE

    What can you say about Shed? It's good and it's inspiring... simple as that. If this isn't in the top 2 I'll have a hard time accepting whoever is.


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    #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdanstan
    Actually it was more like 30 seconds sped up to 7 seconds at variable speeds, and I use a figrig ... love it. Here's a clip of the original non CC'ed footage at original speed. Beware, watching this clip may Kill the magic as its pretty unimpressive. Thanks again Derek. I hope this is helpful.
    You've helped a bunch. Your breakdowns in your responses are helping me (and possibly many others) become a better filmmaker... for that I am truly grateful for you taking the time out to do so.

    I wasn't going to attempt "moneyshot" for the short I'm shooting this weekend (sorry... it's easier to refer to it as this). Figured I'd experiment first. But after seeing footage, I have the confidence to try a take or two prepped for freeze frame and whip edits.

    I'll be getting Barry's book, getting the EVS overlays, and will begin to look seriously at the fig rig... how that for helping me.

    BTW: Wow.. someone who actually owns a fig rig! You can't FIND an independent review for those things! Seems too good to be true!

    1)Ever try one of those West Wing walking backwards to catch dialog moves?

    2)How long before your arms fatigue?

    3)Better than a glidecam

    I PROMISE these will be my last questions... til you make your next awesome movie that is!

    Derek
    2 x GH5's, 2 x GH4's
    Tokina 11-16 DX, Panny 12-35, Sigma 18-35, Sigma 50-150 HSM
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    #30
    Lucky Duck disjecta's Avatar
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    Disclaimer: I have not read the other comments in this thread mainly due to lack of time so forgive me if I'm being repetitive and/or redundant.

    First, let me say that the opening sequence is very well edited. Lots of quick cuts suggest preparation for something ominous. The strained look on the lead’s face as the film title bounces around erratically adds to the overall flavor of tension and sets the tone of the movie within seconds.

    Your choice for the lead in this film is perfect. He could be a used car sales man or an executive…ultimately, he is a family man and I instantly cared about him. The only nit picky thing I would say about the shot with the film title is I would not have overlapped it on his shoulder, it takes away from the space it could occupy happily on the wooden door.

    It would not have been my choice to portray the wife and daughter anonymously. It contrasts too heavily with the already established intimacy we have towards the man. Why could we not see the strain of it all in the daughter’s eyes and maybe the pained but comforting eyes of the mother? I could only relate to them through the man’s eyes…not a huge thing but it left me unhinged a little.

    I loved the blurring as mother and daughter returned to the house and the jump cuts and music gave it a vintage movie feel…almost theatrical angst. Was the flying bug a happy accident? It really added to the flavor of where this story takes place….I notice these small things.

    Some old tried and true techniques to show the passing of time are effective. I like your combination of hard cuts and cross dissolves. The latter, when combined with the former serve to make time feel stretched to its limit. By confining what is in your frame and fitting the lead inside this box, the feeling of claustrophobia was heightened. The implied flies buzzing around enhanced the feeling of loneliness and something that was bordering on pathetic. Again, I felt, through images and sound alone, I was penetrating into the psyche of this individual, I could feel his pain long before we get a glimpse of the massive wound on his arm.

    I’m a big fan of long dissolves and again we are getting a sense of time passing that made me fidget, I wanted to get out of this space myself…tension slowly builds…what’s going to happen to this man?

    As the wound infects, so does the sound….the buzzing, diseased audio gives us bad news. You avoided making the sound of the bandage being unraveled too hokey…it’s just enough to be disgusting but not call attention to itself. The message is conveyed subtly. The visible bone is suitably gross…thanks Jack. Nice use of selective focus for this sequence.

    The 360 degree technique worked well for the hammering sequence. It would have been more realistic to me if he had recovered his arm. With the bone hanging out and he, looking like he’s just bustling about his business in a determined fashion, brought me back into reality and unpaused my disbelief. Not a huge problem, but it distracted me nonetheless.

    Nice touch on the finger breaking off….that really conveyed the slow decay and stark realization that this was not getting any better.

    I loved the little girl’s laughter as he looked at the imprint of her feet and I also liked the suggestion of looking at photos rather than succumbing to the temptation to show photos of happier times…bonus points for avoiding that cliché.

    The timelapse and transitions from the shed to the model shed to the radio to the wife is a nice sequence…very well paced. The practical is a little blown out there but not a big deal.

    Cutting to the abstract visual of the man at this point is very effective. He looks almost monstrous and the music sells this idea even more. I sense the metamorphosis, the time is near. Something is going to happen soon. The reveal is very well done…nice decay. The camera work is spot on in this sequence, enhancing his struggle to support his own body. It’s almost comedic but in a sinister way.

    I found myself wondering how this nail and wire/string setup would work in real life and I was convinced it couldn’t…not without some kind of smooth pullies instead of nails….maybe it’s just me but, again, it distracted me because it didn’t seem like a believable setup. Having said that, it was very easy to see what you were conveying. The rifle barrel was well placed in the frame. The time it took to actually pull the trigger was appropriate.

    The ending was disappointing to me because it was totally predictable. Maybe it’s just because I saw 10 other movies that had a similar ending. I liked the camera move and the music into the wound on the daughter’s leg but I still felt a little cheated, given how much I had bought into the originality of the rest of the film.

    The cinematography suited the story very well. I liked the overall look you got and the color palette you chose. Nice contrast in the colors between the interior of the shed and the exterior/interior of the house. I never felt anything for the mother and daughter because they were literally faceless. Again, I think it would have benefited the film if you had portrayed them a little less abstractly.

    Overall, I felt like this was a very good film. Aside from the things I mentioned above, I didn’t feel like anything was out of place and it flowed quite well. When it was all over, I felt like I knew the man and I felt sorry for him.

    Jack, you did a fine job and I hope you take this talent of yours seriously and continue to make films.


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